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SMG Clutch and Flywheel replacement

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Hi all,

Even though my car is an E63 M6, I thought I'd share my recent experience of replacing the clutch and flywheel after the dreaded clutch judder that eventually effects the S85 engine and SMG box.

I know this causes a lot of concern to existing owners and potential owners, so I thought I'd post a relatively good news story.

My car is a 2006 E63 M6 and has done a shade over 61k miles. The clutch judder started recently and not having an extended warranty, I was aware that BMW stealers quote between £2.6 - £3k to replace the clutch and flywheel.

I should point out that I have a local Indy who is an ex BMW mastertech with nearly 25 years experience. In one form or another, he's been looking after my cars since my 1985 E30 318i in the early 90's.

Unfortunately, he was on 2 weeks summer holiday and I knew I had to bite the bullet and use the local stealer to keep me mobile. As predicted, after initial diagnosis, their quote came in at £2,639.15, which included replacing an O2 sensor at £125.70.

Although I'm fortunate that I could pay the bill, out of principal, I wouldn't. A quick bit of googling revealed that the flywheel BMW fit is manufactured by LUK and the clutch by Sachs. I'm sure a lot of you know this already, but I guess it's useful information for the thread.

A quick look at Euro Car Parts revealed that they stock the LUK flywheel and Valeo clutch kit. I then had a look at GSF car parts, who couldn't compete on price for the flywheel, but showed they stocked a 'premium' clutch kit, which a quick phone call revealed as Sachs.

With the additional discount for the recent bank holiday, the total cost for parts was as follows (including delivery and VAT):

Flywheel - £ 421.89

Clutch Kit - £ 516.51

Whilst this still seems a lot, in comparison against the stealers original quote for these parts at

£ 2,156.34 inc VAT, I'd already saved £1,217.94!

I realised that I'd still need a few sundry items, such as a new fork, guide bush and various ball pins, spring clips and fillister bolts etc, but the stealer quoted me a grand total of £30.67 for these, so I wasn't concerned.

The next step was the labour time and hourly rate. As my car is over 5 years old, the stealer has a 5+ labour rate, fixed at £65 per hour, so not too bad really. We started negotiations at 7.5 hours and ended up (after much research and negotiation) on 4.5 hours. Total labour cost including VAT was therefore £351.00.

Total cost for parts, labour and VAT was £ 1,320.07. Yes, this is a lot of money, but we all know that if you own an M car, you can't run them on a Vauxhall / Ford budget and compared to the original stealer quote, was around half the cost.

To put this in perspective, the Service Manager advised me that on the same day, they'd replaced a clutch on a 2011 320d and that came in at £1,600.

In summary, don't always be afraid of the stealer, but definitely be very wary of their parts costs!

I hope this thread helps another M owner and takes some of the scare away about the costs of owning and running these cars.

Thanks for reading

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Thanks Adam!

Hi bm530. In short, I used to be a self employed consultant in the Fleet Industry for 20 years (more on the innovation and new products to market side), but made a lot of friends in the industry. Particularly handy is my friend who heads up the maintenance control team for one of the largest leasing companies in the UK. He checked the ICME and Autodata labour times and advised that clutch only is authorised at 3.9 hours labour and the clutch, together with flywheel is 4.1 hours labour.

I should explain that the stealer was trying to charge me for the same job twice. I'd specifically asked them to split the box from the engine, so that I could inspect the parts and more importantly identify if it was the guide bush at fault. They tried to charge me 1.75 hours to do this and also a further 1.75 hours for 'diagnostic' work.

I obviously argued that plugging the car into the OBD II port to run a diagnostic was .5 hour at worst. I also argued that they couldn't charge me twice to remove the gearbox. Thankfully, backed with facts, I won the argument :-)

Hope this helps.

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Well done it's about time we put the stealers in there place, good result!

 

So which dealer are we talking about, being hampshire based is it scotthall's now partridge?

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Thanks Adam!

Hi bm530. In short, I used to be a self employed consultant in the Fleet Industry for 20 years (more on the innovation and new products to market side), but made a lot of friends in the industry. Particularly handy is my friend who heads up the maintenance control team for one of the largest leasing companies in the UK. He checked the ICME and Autodata labour times and advised that clutch only is authorised at 3.9 hours labour and the clutch, together with flywheel is 4.1 hours labour.

I should explain that the stealer was trying to charge me for the same job twice. I'd specifically asked them to split the box from the engine, so that I could inspect the parts and more importantly identify if it was the guide bush at fault. They tried to charge me 1.75 hours to do this and also a further 1.75 hours for 'diagnostic' work.

I obviously argued that plugging the car into the OBD II port to run a diagnostic was .5 hour at worst. I also argued that they couldn't charge me twice to remove the gearbox. Thankfully, backed with facts, I won the argument :-)

Hope this helps.

 

 

Thanks for that

 

suppose you shouldn't always believe what they say, good on you for doing all your research and the main bit having proof to back it up

 

Cheers

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