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Nick E

Winter's coming...

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Any tips for underbody treatment for an E39 to prevent winter having a field day underneath?

I don't want to Waxoyl (or equivalent) it.

 

Cheers,

 

Nick 

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22 minutes ago, Nick E said:

Any tips for underbody treatment for an E39 to prevent winter having a field day underneath?

I don't want to Waxoyl (or equivalent) it.

 

Cheers,

 

Nick 

 

Look at my project pal; last few pages where I've used Lanoguard etc :) 

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23 hours ago, d_a_n1979 said:

 

Look at my project pal; last few pages where I've used Lanoguard etc :) 

 

Cheers Dan. Sorry to read you're selling her.

 

Would you recommend this be done with the car up on a lift, or is it something that could be done on jacks and stands?

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8 minutes ago, Nick E said:

 

Cheers Dan. Sorry to read you're selling her.

 

Would you recommend this be done with the car up on a lift, or is it something that could be done on jacks and stands?

 

I did it on the drive with wheels off and car on axle stands pal; plenty of room to work and it allows you to give all those areas a decent clean and dry off before you apply the Lanoguard too :) 

 

Prep is key with this

 

I removed the wheels; removed the wheel arch liners. Gave all the areas a douse with ACP; scrubbed them, rinsed them (hose pipe not power washer) and then I dried the arches off as best as I could with a small electric fan heater that I kept changing the angles of, so it got into all the nooks & crannies etc

 

Laid down a large tarp to catch any over spray and drips and then applied the Lanoguard by spray. I covered everything inc the arch lips, that's essential.

 

I then removed all 4 jacking pads (bought new ones to replace them) and used the long lance that's provided in the kit to absolutely douse the inside of the sills. I did this with the rear end jacked up slightly and then vice-versa with the front end; so the Lanoguard had chance to coat the entire inner sill and run out. I taped up the jacking pad holes and then after a few days; removed the tape, wiped the excess off and fitted the jack pads

 

It's an easy job; took a day to do; but not a full day rolling around under the car; there are a lot of clips (IMO buy new ones off eBay as some will snap etc) and the arch liners can be brittle with age, so be careful when removing those :) 

 

Oh; your hands will smell like old sheep too; but you'll be waterproof for a good few days :lol::mrgreen:

 

Thanks re my car; it's not a desperate sell. I've a few parties interested in it, some coming to view it next week and if it sells then it sells, if it doesn't then I keep it and keep using it. But sometimes, the times right to sell, which I feel it is now ;) 

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Did some long overdue finishing off of the tailgate, boot lid, and rear arch yesterday, reprimed over some other parts of the sills and arch that been under Bilt Hamber 80 for months..

 

Underneath though, the sills look like they may need some work. Will take it to my local to see if it's just superficial, or needs proper going over.

Edited by Nick E

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9 hours ago, Nick E said:

Did some long overdue finishing off of the tailgate, boot lid, and rear arch yesterday, reprimed over some other parts of the sills and arch that been under Bilt Hamber 80 for months..

 

Underneath though, the sills look like they may need some work. Will take it to my local to see if it's just superficial, or needs proper going over.

Remember that primer isn't a paint, and most of them don't protect metal from moisture and rusting. You need some paint on top of primer, to protect metal.

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On 9/9/2021 at 7:40 PM, Ray112 said:

Remember that primer isn't a paint, and most of them don't protect metal from moisture and rusting. You need some paint on top of primer, to protect metal.

 

Oi' ain't finished yet.. :)

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I have recentlyremoved front seats and inspected the plugs/holes bellow the carpet. Every single one had a healthy onset of rust spreading from the hole. Filed, sanded, brushed the rust, liberally supplied phosphoric acid converter, brushed off the converted oxide, primed with epoxy primer, refitted the plugs and sealed the lot with a brush on seam sealer, liberally applied below and on top of the plug. To finish off I will now spray some paint over. Relatively easy job as you can do one side at the time. Just remove the front seat, pull off the B pillar and then lift the carpet halves and tie them to the other seat/gear stick with some rope so that it stays up. A point to note - from the underside all looked OK - just some light, barely visible surface rust on the plug. It was anything but as all the damage was inside, under the carpet. The picture attached was taken during the process - immediately after the rust converter was applied, still wet. The car has spent last 5 winters as a winter daily on some rather salty roads though. I have just had rocker panels replaced as the old ones were too rusty. The floor panel had a last minute save.20210910_015205.thumb.jpg.b0c4eb78d54dd6e822dc2443291564a8.jpg

 

Edited by dmarkovina1

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6 hours ago, STYKLEV_61@abv.bg said:

A box of wd40 you will be fine and a half hour at a garage to use their ramp. 

Are you suggesting to use WD-40 to stop metal from rusting further? If so, you are totally wrong, WD-40 will cause even more rusting issues. It's not oil it's penetrating fluid.

 

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I don't think it will cause more rust, but on its own it won't hold as it will wash away very quickly. If you want to protect cavities such as doors (particularly the bottom seams which tend to rust from the inside) you can soak it first with WD-40 to penetrate deep into seams and attack any rust there. But you must follow it up with cavity nwax to prevent moisture from getting back into the seam. Easy access via drain holes. The same would apply to rocker panels - easy access via jacking points and holes for the sill covers' plugs. Any spraying plain wd40 over underbody is a waste of time, it's gone after the first drive in rain.

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WD-40 is causing more rust, where rust has started to spread. Spraying WD-40 anywhere else apart from routed bolt threads is not good idea. And normally people use cavity vax to protect internal areas of various panels and parts. 

No one ever have suggested to use WD-40, because it's quite stupid and pointless idea. 

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1 minute ago, dmarkovina1 said:

I must have been lucky then as WD40s and other brands' alternatives I have been using for the past 40 odd years have been doing the exact opposite.

You are spraying WD-40 to stop rust spreading on car metal parts?

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You must have confused me with somebody else or haven't read my previous posts - if you had you would have seen how I tackle rust, even photos were provided.

 

Back to the argument: You seem to be claiming that WD-40 causes rust, whereas I am saying that it doesn't, not in my experience at least.

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7 minutes ago, dmarkovina1 said:

You must have confused me with somebody else or haven't read my previous posts - if you had you would have seen how I tackle rust, even photos were provided.

 

Back to the argument: You seem to be claiming that WD-40 causes rust, whereas I am saying that it doesn't, not in my experience at least.

Well years ago I saw neighbors E36 with rust on boot lid edge, through the winter he was spraying WD-40 monthly over rusty areas. In spring time that rust was twice more than before winter, so there's definitely no protection in it. 

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I am just trying to explain for sake of answering the questions what stops salt from destroying your car this winter is wd40 stupid or not.

 

People have been using it in buckets and all its done is stop their cars becoming rotten and falling apart. 

Edited by STYKLEV_61@abv.bg

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When I road bikes at the start of winter I would cover the engine and other relevant parts in WD40 to protect. Then in the spring use de greaser. This kept my bikes "looking good"

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10 hours ago, Ray112 said:

Well years ago I saw neighbors E36 with rust on boot lid edge, through the winter he was spraying WD-40 monthly over rusty areas. In spring time that rust was twice more than before winter, so there's definitely no protection in it. 

You saw a neighbour's rusted e36 and you thought that you should tell people not to use wd40 guess what we are still going to use it anyway.

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3 minutes ago, STYKLEV_61@abv.bg said:

You saw a neighbour's rusted e36 and you thought that you should tell people not to use wd40 guess what we are still going to use it anyway.

I saw rust spreading much more further, so WD-40 doesn't sound like much protection.

And I don't give a toss what you are using. No one else on here isn't spraying WD-40 to protect car from rusting. People with common sense knows, there's choices of cavity vax for this purpose. And you don't want to spray WD-40 before cavity vax, it's will reduce vax ability to stick on surfaces. You want surfaces as dry and clean as possible. 

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