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Barboots

Wet Floor - Looking For Online Helpers

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Hi Beamsters,

 

I've found our 5'ers floors is very wet and am getting stuck into the job straight away. It's 8pm here, so you can see I'm motivated.

 

Backstory... the car was parked nose up in a decent downpour. I initially thought the sunroof drains, but I've checked them and they're good. I'm now suspecting that firewall issue I've previously glanced over reading here. Anyway, that comes after drying it.

 

I've wet-vacuumed out about 4L, but I can't sleep leaving that wet foam underlay. I've started lifting the carpet, and have just unbolted the front seat. I'm guessing I should disconnect the battery before unplugging the seat harnesses... so I'm wondering if there's a recommended position to park the front seat for easiest removal? Guidance on that would be great at this point.

 

Please and thank you ;-)

 

Cheers,

Steve

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You'll have to move the seats fully rear to remove the two front bolts, then fully forward for the two rear bolts.

By doing it this way around you end up with the seat mounts largely under the seat, rather than sticking out the front if you had done rear before front.

As long as the ignition is off when you unplug the seats, and stays off until they're reconnected you should avoid any SRS warnings.

Probably easier to lift the sill protectors to get under the carpet than try to go under the centre console without stripping it out. I found most of the front carpet can be lifted like this when I was reinstating the ducting and speakers removed as a police vehicle.

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Have a read may help.
Yeah no one is really talking about the actual process of removing the carpet and under-foam. I've released everything except along the transmission tunnel...

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You'll have to move the seats fully rear to remove the two front bolts, then fully forward for the two rear bolts.
By doing it this way around you end up with the seat mounts largely under the seat, rather than sticking out the front if you had done rear before front.
As long as the ignition is off when you unplug the seats, and stays off until they're reconnected you should avoid any SRS warnings.
Probably easier to lift the sill protectors to get under the carpet than try to go under the centre console without stripping it out. I found most of the front carpet can be lifted like this when I was reinstating the ducting and speakers removed as a police vehicle.


Thanks Andy. That's my usual approach in the absence of other info... keep the mech under the seat. I also defaulted to folding the seat forward, although haven't removed it as yet.

I have removed all the sill edges and worked under the foam a bit, but I really want to remove the carpet and foam entirely. I'll retire hoping that maybe when I wake up in the morning some legend will have posted how to release the carpet from the centre console assembly.

In the absence of that, to slightly better weather for working on it.

Cheers,
Steve

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Sadly, if you take a look at realoem.com

https://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=5K12-EUR-09-2013-F11N-BMW-530d&diagId=51_8992

 

You'll see the carpet is one piece front, and one piece rear, so you have no choice but a load of stripping to remove the centre console to remove the carpet completely.

May require a change in plans...

 

Good luck however you choose to proceed.

 

 

 

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To remove the carpet fully you need to fully remove the full centre console, trim around the pedals, door entry trim pieces.
 

I’d get the grommet area behind the acoustic cover in the engine compartment cleaned out pronto as it is probably still leaking residual water into the car and each time it rains it will make the situation worse - don’t leave it.

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Thanks Andy and Matthew. That info ends the plan as such. I had read people drying carpet in ways that sounded like it was outside the vehicle, but maybe they were just talking about the mats

I am also already working on clearing the grommet. Last night I had a cover over the car to avoid going backwards in my drying efforts, which initially was my first priority. The weather is is very bad here right now, and I don't have a garage... so I'm juggling the two aspects of the overall job. Daylight will help the preventative part.

Cheers, Steve

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15 hours ago, Barboots said:

Wondering if anyone has any commentary on suitable dehumidifiers?

 

You've posted the same question in 2 threads in this forum, one is sufficient as you will get no more attention with 2.

 

I wouldn't leave a dehumidifier in the car for any length of time, (whatever the brand, they all do the same thing) as you will possibly do more long term damage than good - drying out the leather seats from their natural moisture content is not good.

 

For the water under the carpet and sound insulation you need to prop up the carpet and dry it with towels and/or wet/dry vac. Then ventilation and heat are a far better bet. 

Edited by Matthew Ashton

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You've posted the same question in 2 threads in this forum, one is sufficient as you will get no more attention with 2.

I thought that 8 hours would have produced a response in the main thread. Apologies... I wanted to progress what is obviously a time relevant job.

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You could leave a dehumidifier running set at 55-60% moisture, that way it should not damage or dry out the leather interior, just make sure all the doors and windows are fully shut, many years ago I had a Volkswagen passat that had water ingress issue and that's what I did to dry it out, it did take several days, but it was in the winter months.

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You could leave a dehumidifier running set at 55-60% moisture, that way it should not damage or dry out the leather interior, just make sure all the doors and windows are fully shut, many years ago I had a Volkswagen passat that had water ingress issue and that's what I did to dry it out, it did take several days, but it was in the winter months.
It's on 40%, which is about what it is in summer here.

The machine has been on for two days. I just checked it and repositioned some of the carpet/foam as it was against the floor... it's not possible to have everything elevated at once... I think another 24 hours will have it done.

I don't believe I could have satisfactorily dried the car in a reasonable period with just towels and airflow during our current cool/moist conditions. Whether a 20-30L/day domestic machine would have worked, I don't know. The dimensions of the equipment certainly would have posed more challenges than the "esky" sized box I hired.

Probably the most annoying overall aspect is the difficulty in removing the seat belt from the seat. I couldn't get a tool onto that Torx no matter how much I swore at it. So I had to leave the seat inside and just move it around. Not ideal.

Cheers, Steve

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Some images of the carpet and foam elevation, and the hired commercial "cube" dehumidifier. I first ran it in the boot... this was the second position. a0eec05239a57df4eaae19d39b61543f.jpgb678ea689ffeeb0aecf8528606723cdd.jpg7b4f813a8192be2777dae29d9e8c70e0.jpgdc47224fdeaccd191a321035b319ea79.jpg

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