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Munzy123

Brake bleed results?

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I took my F11 to a main BMW dealer to have the brakes bled as it was only £87 and I don’t currently have anywhere to do it myself. 
 

My question is- should the pedal feel different/firmer after the bleed as it feels exactly the same as before it was done, namely a bit spongy with more travel than I’d like?

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Ive had two brake fluid changes on my car (due a third now) and each time ive felt an improvement in the pedal. When i mentioned that on here, iirc there were a few people saying they felt no difference.

 

I guess it depends on how much air/moisture was in the old fluid. Or how sensitive your right foot is, hehe.

Edited by bmwmike

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I’ve never felt any pedal difference on any BMW I’ve owned regardless of who did the fluid change. BMW, Indy or me. All the same. 
 

Brakes are always spot on and can stop me when I really need them too. 

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I took my car to the local BMW dealer for a brake fluid change. I asked, given the lockdown and very low mileage, was it necessary? He said it is required every 2 years regardless of mileage. I think this is wrong since the correct answer is to do a hydroscopic test to see how much water is in the brake fluid - reducing performance. Not impressed this is just money for old rope. No difference at all after the change.

Edited by ajl530d
typo

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Same as the others had the brake fluid changed by local independent as I don't have the tools, felt just the same. I believe also that the fluid is much better these days and moisture contamination is very small if at all.

 

Sent from my SM-G996B using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

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I've had a pig of a time with bleeding my brakes.

 

Flushed the fluid after changing discs and pads and then bled using 2 man method + DSC activation in ISTA. The pedal feels softer than before.

 

Just bought a power bleeder and will try using that instead.

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12 hours ago, bmwmike said:

 

 

I guess it depends on how much air/moisture was in the old fluid. Or how sensitive your right foot is, hehe.


This will be the key! If you drive hard on the brakes (over heavy right foot) then your fluid will deteriorate faster from more hot/cold cycles. 
 

I change mine also when doing an axle set of brakes so sometimes the fluid is only a year old when being changed, less chance of it deteriorating in that time frame. 

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12 hours ago, ajl530d said:

I took my car to the local BMW dealer for a brake fluid change. I asked, given the lockdown and very low mileage, was it necessary? He said it is required every 2 years regardless of mileage. I think this is wrong since the correct answer is to do a hydroscopic test to see how much water is in the brake fluid - reducing performance. Not impressed this is just money for old rope. No difference at all after the change.

 

I agree they should check the fluid but would only check the fluid from the bleed nipple. In theory the fluid should all mix but we've all seen fluid come out of calipers that is worse than the reservoir. 

 

I bought a very cheap brake fluid tester off e-bay and got some fresh fluid in a container and and started adding water in very small quantities. The cheapo tester is extremely sensitive and immediately detected any water,  so if it shows green then i'm happy!

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Thanks guys, reassuring to hear others have felt no real difference at the pedal after a bleed, disappointed it still feels soft but will do. 

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I feel a difference too, as ive already said. In fact mine are overdue a bleed and whilst they stop fine and very assuredly right now thats not really the question - i almost guarantee the quality of the pedal feel will improve with new fluid, when I get round to doing it.  Its very subtle, but it is there. 

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I have never noticed any difference after changing the brake fluid every 2 years as service required, after using a pressure brake bleeder, I also never noticed any difference when I change the brake fluid for the first time when the vehicle was 3 years old.

You will notice a difference in the brake pedal feel if you change the pads at the same time as a brake fluid change until the pads bed in, at least that's my own experience.

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4 hours ago, Oilburner said:

I have never noticed any difference after changing the brake fluid every 2 years as service required


Nor me, and outside the warranty period I very seldom do it. My opinion is that for normal or even fairly nippy road driving it’s a complete waste of time and money. Comments that one sees such as losing the brakes due to absorbed moisture boiling make me laugh.

 

(Not advice of any sort, just my own view)l

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I'll be changing mine after the two year period is up even though it will be lucky to have been used for 2,000 miles.

 

Cracking open each bleed screw once every two years ensures that when you really need too, you can still open the bleeder.  For example if you have a leak in the system (as any E60 owner will tell you due to corrosion of the lines) it will need bleeding.  If the nipples are seized its a problem.  Heating a seized caliper nipple will make the fluid boil meaning it will need replacing anyway.

 

Preventative maintenance every two years gets my vote especially as brake fluid is cheap as chips and it gives you an excuse to carry out a check of the now exposed suspension. 

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Its not fluid that make the difference, its air. In any case its a 2yr service, not sure why you wouldnt do it. Keeps everything tip top.

 

Last time i did it the old fluid was darker than the new. Says it all really.

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23 minutes ago, 535i Andrew said:

As its only you that notices a difference Mike, it must be the way you drive it.:lol:

 

 

:D

 

:ph34r: :lol:

 

Dont think it was only me was it. In any case whatever, regardless of whether someone can feel the benefit of refreshing litterally the thing that connects your foot and the piston behind the brake pad, which literally sucks in moist air and degrades over time, and many manufacturers place a 2 year service life on,  I can't imagine why anyone wouldnt replace it on schedule as its a cheap service item. Its what, only £80 odd quid at a bmw franchliars.

 

:D

 

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The only thing I did noticed doing a brake fluid change when it was the first change at 3 years and all the following 2 year changes, the old brake fluid is exactly the same colour as the new brake fluid, which does make you calculated approximate how much to bleed out of each brake nipple, would be good if the new brake fluid was a different colour.

Whilst I do have one of those pen type brake fluid testers, which I purchased out of curiosity to check some new opened can of brake fluid, whilst it did indicate some moisture in the new fluid, the can had been opened and about a 1/4 used and had been standing in the workshop for two years, I personally would still not rely on this type of tester, new brake fluid is certainly cheaper than maybe possibly causing corrosion issues with the caliper pistons, and master cylinder.

I'm old enough to remember many years ago not many people bothered changing the brake fluid, consequently the wheel cylinders would leak due to corrosion and the clutch and master cylinder could go the same way, all due to moisture in the brake fluid as it's hygroscopic, ie absorbs water once opened.

Since adopting two year brake fluid changes as recommended, in the last 20+ years I have never ever had any issues with caliper pistons or master cylinders leaking.



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I swapped to ATE super blue on my e28 so you could see when it was through. The rest i just pull a few reservoirs full through.

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On 03/08/2021 at 11:54, bmwmike said:

literally sucks in moist air and degrades over time, and many manufacturers place a 2 year service life on,  I can't imagine why anyone wouldnt replace it on schedule as its a cheap service item. Its what, only £80 odd quid at a bmw franchliars.


totally agree!

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On 8/3/2021 at 7:46 PM, duncan-uk said:

I swapped to ATE super blue on my e28 so you could see when it was through. The rest i just pull a few reservoirs full through.

I loved the blue stuff but I heard they stopped adding the dye due to some regulation.  

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5 hours ago, bmwPower said:

I heard they stopped adding the dye due to some regulation.  

 

Aww what?  I saw a great video on youtube that showed just as @duncan-uk describes, the new stuff coming thru as it such a contrasting colour.  You definitely knew you had pulled thru new fluid that way.

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From what i read (albeit briefly) it was made illegal to sell in the states so ATE just dropped the dye but sell the same fluid as before.

 

Seems daft to me as you could swap between the colours and know you've done the change.

 

Invariably i'll just pull through a couple of litres to be sure.

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