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E39 M5 Values - Polarising subject

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This is a subject that divides people.  I am in the process of buying anew car for my wife and thought about selling mine, which I am not now and thankfully just going to store her.  I was looking at Pistonheads and the variation in price is quite surprising, I know that cars which have been looked after well fetch a premium but are these prices being achieved by the sellers?  Do you know anyone who has actually sold their car for this sort of money?

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Its an interesting topic - I purchased my e39 M5 earlier this year, as I feared that if I were to hold off then I would miss the boat.

 

I think prices depend on three main factors; milage, condition and modifications.

Non-original / modified cars appear to sell for less.

 

I think people are beginning to pay a small premium for the lower mileage original examples, I have seen a few go up for sale recently <70k miles with an asking price of around £40-50k, weather or not they achieve this I'm not sure.

 

The example I bought was from the cheaper end of the market <£10k - it needed a little TLC and had a few modifications (BC coilovers, back-boxes), which were to my style anyway. I have since purchased a standard suspension & backboxes to store should I ever sell up in the future (I have no plans to for the foreseeable future).

 

I think prices are definitely on the rise, as people like me have realised that this may be the only chance of owning one. Similarly though - people may purchase to tick the box then pass on after 6/12 months - I have seen a few up for sale recently that I recognise when I was in the market for mine.

 

I purchased mine as I knew I was capable of carrying out the TLC, I reckon I would easily in for around £6k upwards in parts & labour had I taken the car to an independent for the work since March.

 

Just like the Wheeler Dealer episode though, I think my car will have been sold for a song at some-point 9 / 10 years ago.

 

Edited by AlexGSi2000

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Personally, I don't think it's a buyers or a sellers market. They are in limbo. Rough cars are sub 10k, good ones are priced up to 20k and then there's the low mileage examples that fetch more (if they are actually selling)

 

One thing is for sure though, they will only go up. Seen it with countless cars from the past. One day they're all over at handy money and before you know it they're changing hands for silly money and people start conversations with '' Remember when you could buy them for 5k''

 

 

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For sure the e39 M5's have finished depreciating a while ago, and have started to climb in value, slowly, they will never but never reach e28 M5 values, simply because alot more than the187 rhd examples of the e28 M5 rolled off the production line.

 

Buy a good one, and if you can look after it yourself you won't lose out.

Edited by Steve van hool
Adf

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I already have mine and just spent a small fortune on bodywork etc.  @David Wood it’s very true good examples will go up in value.  

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Hi,

 

I'm one of the 'few' who think in the next 5,10,15-20 years, E39 M5's and plenty of other fast versions of mass produced ranges of cars from the likes of Audi, Merc as well, will have lower 'actual selling prices' than what many enthusiasts today believe will happen. There's too many forthcoming 'barriers' approaching on the horizon for E39 M5's to be 'actually' sold in the future for £30/40/50K. The coercing away from fossil fuels has begun with Diesel currently being demonised and in a couple years, it'll be the turn of petrol. In 15 years time, it's a fair forecast to see petrol at £2.50/2.75 per litre, if not touching the £3/litre level. VED will most likely get increased at a more disruptive level, so perhaps £1000 as a minimum for a small engined petrol car and maybe £2K for a large engined one. More cities and larger towns will introduce fossil fuel bans with high per day charges if venturing into a city or city centre with a fossil fueled car, perhaps £50 per day ?  Fossil fueled car parts will have an extra level of taxation/import duty applied and then of course there'll be an extra levy for insuring a fossil fueled/petrol vehicle. 

 

Only those with deep enough pockets, or those who choose to spend a bigger proportion of their disposable income will continue with a petrol, fast variant of such a car. I think Porsche and higher brands will have more owners capable and willing to run a petrol fueled car in the future as it's more likely they'll have the finances to do so. 

 

The 'very best' examples of an E39 M5, in totally 100% OEM spec, in the sought after colours and options, in absolutely fantastic condition with stacks of invoices and bills proving a very high level of maintainence, sub 50K genuine and provable mileage will have a higher chance of selling at 'big money' over the next 10/20+ years. Once you add in the cost of maintaining, storing or driving such a car over this timeframe, it's also unlikely such owners will turn a genuine profit. There's a 'few' such examples, but not many at all. In the meantime, 'asking prices' will continue to be all over the place and cars will hang around unsold for months and in some cases over the last couple, over a year before either actually selling for substantially less after numerous asking price drops or the owner deciding to just keep the car and spend some cash restoring/bringing back up to scratch condition wise. 

 

I may well be wrong on it all, but given the above changes on the horizon, the 'interesting' car market will soon not be like how it was in the past !

 

Cheers, Dennis!

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13 hours ago, DennisCooper said:

Hi,

 

I'm one of the 'few' who think in the next 5,10,15-20 years, E39 M5's and plenty of other fast versions of mass produced ranges of cars from the likes of Audi, Merc as well, will have lower 'actual selling prices' than what many enthusiasts today believe will happen. There's too many forthcoming 'barriers' approaching on the horizon for E39 M5's to be 'actually' sold in the future for £30/40/50K. The coercing away from fossil fuels has begun with Diesel currently being demonised and in a couple years, it'll be the turn of petrol. In 15 years time, it's a fair forecast to see petrol at £2.50/2.75 per litre, if not touching the £3/litre level. VED will most likely get increased at a more disruptive level, so perhaps £1000 as a minimum for a small engined petrol car and maybe £2K for a large engined one. More cities and larger towns will introduce fossil fuel bans with high per day charges if venturing into a city or city centre with a fossil fueled car, perhaps £50 per day ?  Fossil fueled car parts will have an extra level of taxation/import duty applied and then of course there'll be an extra levy for insuring a fossil fueled/petrol vehicle. 

 

Only those with deep enough pockets, or those who choose to spend a bigger proportion of their disposable income will continue with a petrol, fast variant of such a car. I think Porsche and higher brands will have more owners capable and willing to run a petrol fueled car in the future as it's more likely they'll have the finances to do so. 

 

The 'very best' examples of an E39 M5, in totally 100% OEM spec, in the sought after colours and options, in absolutely fantastic condition with stacks of invoices and bills proving a very high level of maintainence, sub 50K genuine and provable mileage will have a higher chance of selling at 'big money' over the next 10/20+ years. Once you add in the cost of maintaining, storing or driving such a car over this timeframe, it's also unlikely such owners will turn a genuine profit. There's a 'few' such examples, but not many at all. In the meantime, 'asking prices' will continue to be all over the place and cars will hang around unsold for months and in some cases over the last couple, over a year before either actually selling for substantially less after numerous asking price drops or the owner deciding to just keep the car and spend some cash restoring/bringing back up to scratch condition wise. 

 

I may well be wrong on it all, but given the above changes on the horizon, the 'interesting' car market will soon not be like how it was in the past !

 

Cheers, Dennis!

 

 

Agree

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Dennis does make some good points.  As with the E39 M5 and other modern classics I don't think that the mainstream introduction of electric cars will have much impact nor the rising price of fuel, these cars will always appeal to a select few who will not be using these as their daily drives.  The cars which have been well looked after and have not hit ridiculous miles will I believe always be desirable, although not achieving 50K plus as with the concours vehicles these I believe will be sitting in the 20k plus bracket in the next 3 years or so.   These aren't investments as such but for me certainly softens the blow of the upkeep :) :) :).  

@Davidwood can't agree more with you on the electric car front, for anything decent it's 80K and up!!!  Not to mention the environmental impact of mining all that lithium, the prices for lithium have doubled over the last three years plus is there enough to go around.  Put more money into the hydrogen fuel cell I say.

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Personally....

 

If you have one, drive it and enjoy it... don't worry about appreciation or depreciation costs...

 

Use it for what it is intended, no point in buying one to stare at, they are a piece of art but the real enjoyment is in using rather than looking...

 

 

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Hi,

 

POF - Part of me and pretty much every 'petrolhead' in the UK wants it to be that we can enjoy them for many decades to come ! ..   maybe it will turn out that we can and as 'affordably' as currently!

 

PT - Hmhm!

 

Duncan - Yes, it's only sometimes I make sense!, thanks for the vote of confidence, your Xmas card is in the post still ! ;)

 

Seesure - I'd say there's only a relative few number of E39 M5 owners, like yourself who will daily drive an M5, enjoy and use it for what it's for, use it for daily requirements, not worry about depreciation and running costs etc. The majority I'd say are evening/weekend use and then some of those for 'Fun/Spirited' evening/weekend use and the rest being more garage queens and in long(er) term storage for collection purposes/lack of use/investment & hopeful appreciation/high actual selling price in 20 years time reasons. There's quite alot of the latter catagory too !

 

Cheers, Dennis!

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On 13/12/2019 at 10:32, Seesure said:

Personally....

 

If you have one, drive it and enjoy it... don't worry about appreciation or depreciation costs...

 

Use it for what it is intended, no point in buying one to stare at, they are a piece of art but the real enjoyment is in using rather than looking...

 

 

Unfortunately, I stress out too much about putting miles on my E39 540 Sport. It turned 40k miles on 2nd October last year and today is on 40,600 miles - nothing at all in that time, but it isn't my daily and I tend to put around 150 miles a month on it.

 

Having bought it at 35k nearly two years ago and considering the low mileage and excellent condition, the problem really is that I want to wrap it in cotton wool and keep the miles down - daft really! :roll:

 

   

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6 minutes ago, Loadmaster said:

Unfortunately, I stress out too much about putting miles on my E39 540 Sport. It turned 40k miles on 2nd October last year and today is on 40,600 miles - nothing at all in that time, but it isn't my daily and I tend to put around 150 miles a month on it.

 

Having bought it at 35k nearly two years ago and considering the low mileage and excellent condition, the problem really is that I want to wrap it in cotton wool and keep the miles down - daft really! :roll:

 

That's why i would never have another really low miler.

 

When i was 18 I had a spitfire with 22k on @ 13yrs old - i did drive it but always worried slightly about putting the miles on it, i sold it 17yrs later with just 42k

 

Some of that it was laid up (whilst studying and then living in London) but wish i'd just driven it more.

 

I'd rather a used but nice car of average miles so that doesn't worry me!

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Even if I keep it for another five years (which will be the absolute maximum and governed by retirement) and did, say, an average of 300 miles per month, that would still only be 58,500 miles ish at 24 years old.

 

If it's kept well maintained (which it will be) and in the condition it is now, it certainly won't be worth any less than it is today, whatever that figure might be.

 

Right, I'm popping out for a drive! :lol:

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In 16 years I've managed to rack up over 280k miles in my E39 M5s....I'd rather drive them and enjoy them :mrgreen:

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Haven't been on here for a while.

 

What miles are you on now Seesure?

 

Regarding values, I think due to the miles most are on it only makes any sense to pay decent money for one that's had the timing chain and rod bearings done or is on miles low enough for these not to be a concern for a good while.

 

I did all right with mine, bought for £7400 at 122k miles and sold for £6850 at ~158k miles in 2016.

 

The private buyer who bought it from the trader I sold to got in touch through facebook at the time and ended up getting the chain, bearings etc. done at CPC. It's been SORN for over a year and he's since deleted his facebook account so I just wonder what's being done with it. Always keep half an eye out as that'd be one to jump on for £10k or under.

Edited by DirtyHarry88

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On 22/01/2020 at 21:40, DirtyHarry88 said:

Haven't been on here for a while.

 

What miles are you on now Seesure?

 

 

 

186k on the current car bought with 112k on it. Although to be fair my trips around the UK have dropped a fair bit so the mileage is racking up slower than before plus I bought a "temporary"  Merc C200 (2003) whilst the M5 was having issues last summer, - it took almost a month to get it back on the road after the AA cleared the codes and my gargage struggled to keep it running long enough to get any codes triggered... Turned out to be a combination of fuel filter and fuel pump issues...

 

I use the Merc 1 week in three just to keep the battery alive and to make sure the car is warmed up and all the components are given a work out. It get's at least two 60 mile trips in that week with each of them being about 40 miles of motorway.

 

.

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