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nealpina

What differentiates a bus from a coach, or a coach from a bus?

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On ‎16‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 04:46, DerekJr. said:

Coach probably comes from the word 'stagecoach' used for transporting paying passengers and their goods between cities during the horse-drawn era. These journeys would be long enough to have a need to change horses during the journey.

 

Thanks for that, interesting fact

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On ‎13‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 00:03, Steve van hool said:

In most European countries a coach is called a bus, except in France, where a coach is called a car!!

 

On ‎16‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 04:46, DerekJr. said:

I grew up in South Africa and they don't differentiate between bus and coach. They just call it a bus whether it's a commuter bus or long-distance coach. The well-known top tier coaches (Greyhound, Intercape, and Translux) down there tend to be mostly double-deckers towing a luggage trailer (although single deckers do exist), have reclining seats with seat belts, curtains, A/C vents above the seats, hot drinks served by the on-board cabin crew, multiple TVs for watching a movie, and onboard toilet facilities. 

 

13 hours ago, GStarrr said:

The difference between a coach and a bus in the uk anyway is that....

 

I think that's why I asked the question.  I was watching either a TV documentary or film.  They either used the word bus where we will use coach, or it was vice versa.  I questioned it because in the UK we would have called it the opposite.

 

Therefore it's a cultural thing if the word bus or coach is used to describe a large motor vehicle carrying passengers by road

 

P.S.  I like some of the photos which have been posted

Edited by nealpina

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Found a nice definition of coaches when looking at seatbelt regs:

'Vehicles constructed or adapted to carry more than 16 seated passengers, in addition to the driver, which have a gross weight of more than 7.5 tonnes and a maximum speed exceeding 60mph'

 

Also:

'Except for buses designed for urban use with standing passengers, seat belts must be fitted as follows in buses which are not minibuses or coaches...'

So in the interests of fairness, you don't get a seat belt on an urban bus - everybody falls over if the driver brakes sharply. Not just those standing up :)

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/seat-belts-in-minibuses-coaches-and-other-buses/seat-belts-in-minibuses-coaches-and-other-buses

 

BTW. Provided you buy a bus that is 30 years old, you don't carry more than 8 passengers and don't use it for hire and reward, you can drive it on your car licence. It wont be Euro 6. Or 5...

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On 13/11/2019 at 00:03, Steve van hool said:

In most European countries a coach is called a bus, except in France, where a coach is called a car!!

In Italy a bus is called an autobus and a coach a pullman.  Aligns with the idea  of a coach being a luxury bus.

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