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Restart E39 530d Sport Touring

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On 29/11/2018 at 09:53, ttrw2 said:

Fantastic thread! Keep it coming pls

Reading it makes me miss all the fun I had with my 530d.


Cheers Rob. Your thread was the inspiration for a lot of this.

 

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Happy new year!

It was a bit manic in the run up to Christmas so there are very few pictures, but a lot got done. Brakes and suspension are done front and rear (excuse the couple weeks of surface rust).

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The front got Bilstein B6 dampers with the Eibach Pro-kit coils, with new top mounts and control arms. I’ve tried to use Lemforder throughout, but had to get a few bits from Febi and TRW.

 

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I had a square 8J set of 66s restored for winter wheels: BMW silver with Goodyear UltraGrip Gen-1. Even managed to fit them all in an E63 to get them down to the car.

 

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Ride height is much the same, but it’s a lot more controlled and predictable. There is no more knocking from the rear subframe, which is nice. M5 brakes work a treat, they don’t feel ridiculous, just modern. The DS2500 pads are insanely dusty and quite noisy, but they do work really well.
As expected, the Quaife has made a huge difference too. These things are awesome. All in all, very happy with how the car is handling now, even on little winter wheels.

With all that done, it was time to start the transferring parts over for the engine. I fitted an E60 exhaust manifold, these let the GT2260V sit slightly higher which lets them clear the engine mount. I previously fitted a stainless OE E60 manifold, but it cracked, in multiple places, so went with a cast iron eBay special. That went in with OE gaskets, studs and nuts.

 

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The turbo is now a hybrid GT2260V from TDI Turbos in Dorset. Very happy with this.

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I didn’t want to go front-mount as I like AC at low speeds, so the intercooler and its housing are from an E65. The picture is from the original install on my old SE, but it shows how it fits. I’ve since gotten a new Behr unit as the old one was pretty grotty. I cut out the support out for the original intercooler, and bonded in the lower section of the radiator housing from an E65. The quick-connects are from an E60, best use OE for these as all after-market ones I tried leaked, a lot.
 

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Lastly, a set of recondtioned (by bosch) injectors with a set of brass bleed off connectors. The injectors cured the lumpiness at idle, and stopped the thrust bearing catching. Nice and smooth now, especially after a remap from Enda - thank you!

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Lots of progress, but as with all project cars – fix one problem and a new warning light will appear… This time was ABS, which turned out to be the rear left sensor. However, the traction control light is persisting, coming on after about 30 min of driving. I guess this the ABS unit, so will be looking into getting that reconditioned. One of the drive shafts was also very beaten up by whoever changed a bearing last, luckily I still have a couple from my old car. The vacuum pump is still leaking despite a new seal, this needs investigating as I think it is internal to the pump. The knocking engine mounts will be done when I do the ARBs. And, of course, the 3.5 k RPM cut out still exists. I had hoped this was due to a leaking injector, but is more likely the regulator, it will be dealt with very soon.

Until next time

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Edited by sinner

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Cracking project... 

 

When you say the DS2500s are noisy, do you mean squealing or just general braking noise?

 

If squealing, try copper grease on the back of them (just a touch) and on the tabs too, always worked for me with these pads :)

 

What power are you expecting with the hybrid turbo?

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Thank you Dan. I've been enjoying your 730d thread.

Yes, just a bit of squealing. It's only really noticeable with the window down, which isn't a lot this time of year. It does have a dab of copper slip. The stuff I had was not great quality, more greasy than coppery, so I didn't want to use too much. I'll try finding something thicker.

Power wise, I don't really have a goal. It would be nice to get close to 300; the turbo is certainly not limiting this, but the intercooler and head might. The HP pump and rail need doing before it goes much north of 250, I will get it dynoed after that. The main reason for the hybrid was to make the GT2260V a bit more responsive low down.

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A short aside on brakes. I forgot to mention this, but figured you guys might be interested.

While I was reconditioning the brakes a few years ago (forgive the low quality pictures), I thought it might be fun to make a set of titanium pistons. No more corrosion, nice and light, and low thermal conductivity.
 

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I realise this is completely over the top for a 530d, but I had the resources available and a little time to spare. Also, Ti is real pretty.
 

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Last month, I took them out of the old brakes, polished them up and put them into the M5 calipers, where they will spend the rest of their days.
 

Edited by sinner

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16 hours ago, adam- said:

UPDATES, WHERE ARE THEY?!

I know, sorry, work has been non-stop. However, I have been preparing a few things, and I have a week off at the end of March to fit it all.
 

The list, in no particular order, is:
 

Replace damaged drive shaft (recondition replacement)

Eibach ARBs, thanks to @duncan-uk
Engine mounts

CP3 conversion and remap

Arches rolled (when the airbag gave out it snagged the tyre…)

Back on summer wheels

Probably going to take a bit more than a week, but we’ll see.

 

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Sort of an update. Finally finished pulling everything out of the old car, so yesterday it went to the scrappy.

 
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Which was a little bit sad, had a lot of fun with that car. 70k in 3 years and only the airbags failed.  It got me totally hooked on E39s.

 

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Not exactly as planned this time, never is, too much real work stopping play. I only had a couple of days so decided to fix the interior and rebuild the drive shaft (the black stuff is just tannic acid). Managed to get the shaft swapped without dropping the diff or the exhaust, just by jacking up the hub and swearing a bit.

 

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I know wood is not to everyone’s taste, but I much prefer it to the silver plastic. Unfortunately, the CD cover is not quite the same shade as the rest of the trim and there are a few cracks, so on the lookout for another. I guess there’ll be a few sets before I am really happy.

 

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Also fitted a BMW profession CD player and MID to replace the old tape deck, so much nicer. Wiring in the MID loom was pretty easy (there are a couple of good write-ups on here), and I replaced the CD changer with a Bluetooth receiver. Bavsound speakers are next on the list.

Will be tidying up the gearbox mount for the MOT next week. CP3 after that!

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It’s been a reasonably productive weekend. Stopped by Gareth’s to fit some Eibach ARBs I brought from Duncan a few months back. The handling is superb now, even on winter tyres.

 

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Also fitted the adapters I’d made to engage the last two bolts of the gearbox mount with the chassis. They’re two 7075 spacers that bolt into the holes for the auto box mount, and are helicoiled to take the last bolt of the manual mount.

 

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I made some 6 mm washers to give more engagement where I had to cut out material for the offset bolts. It’s very solid now.

 

 

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To top it all off, it sailed through the MOT. Going for the airbag recall tomorrow – I’ll let BMW clean it.

Until next time, cheers

Edited by sinner
betterer engerish

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Awesome work... The ARBs are something I’ve looked into before but never got round to, but think I’ll go for it on my touring :)

 

It may have been asked before, but is that the dude from Car Throttle?

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2 hours ago, d_a_n1979 said:

Awesome work... The ARBs are something I’ve looked into before but never got round to, but think I’ll go for it on my touring :)

 

It may have been asked before, but is that the dude from Car Throttle?

Thanks Dan. Your touring is looking very tidy. Did you get a set of 32s?

The ARBs make a big difference, do it! It's no harsher, just much less rolly, unsurprisingly.


Yes,  Gareth is from CT. An old friend with a shared love of BMW; his M4 is beautiful.

Edited by sinner

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Amazed how much thicker they are in that picture. Glad you got them fitted. Better than hanging up in my garage though now of course I'm thinking I want some


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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9 hours ago, sinner said:

Thanks Dan. Your touring is looking very tidy. Did you get a set of 32s?

The ARBs make a big difference, do it! It's no harsher, just much less rolly, unsurprisingly.


Yes,  Gareth is from CT. An old friend with a shared love of BMW; his M4 is beautiful.

 

I've not gone for 32s now; couldn't find a set that I was happy to pay for (all listed around c£600 in horrendous condition and would need a further £300-£400 to refurb them, then tyres on top, they're not £1k alloys, but others seem to think they are :roll: :lol: ) I'll update re alloys as soon as they land with me and I get them onto the car ;) 

 

Yeah; every thread I've read re the ARB upgrade, on here & Bimmerforums etc all say the same, they make a really noticeable change to the handling, so they're a future plan; after I've done a full brake overhaul :) 

 

Lucky you knowing Garath; everyone needs a friend like him (feed him tea and cake and get your car work done for free) :lol:  I do have a pal like that, a motorsport guru, with a superb garage and set-up, the git still charges me though :lol: :ph34r: bas###d :mrgreen:

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Fun stuff is happening; swapping Czech for German:

 

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Finally getting around to the CP3 conversion. The pump is actually fitted already,  I still have to get the new rail in. Once that's done, I'll write it up properly.

Happy Easter

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The pump is in and, after a whole lot of faff, working!

There is a lot of partial/misinformation out there, so I figured I’d write this up as a sort of How-To, in the hope it saves someone else from a whole lot of faff.

Before getting into the conversion, it’s worth having a read up of this: https://www.scribd.com/doc/282834243/M57-en-pdf . That will give you an idea of how it works, and what to test for with the regulator and sensor.
 

The only special tool needed is a high-pressure pump removal tool.


There are lots of different versions of the CP3, not everything you read applies to all of them. The pump I used is a CP3 R90 from and E65 730d, this was common to many other BMWs until ‘07. This particular pump has no low-pressure gear pump built in, so you must make sure that your in-line pump is producing enough pressure (4+ Bar). It is also a fail-open pump, meaning that when the fuel-control valve loses power, max fuel is sent to the high-pressure circuit instead of the return line. I had the pump tested at the local Bosch place, to ease fault finding later.

 

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Additionally, you need the new rail as it houses both the pressure sensor (at the front) and the pressure-regulating valve (at the rear). My rail came from an E60 535d. You will need new connectors for the regulator and sensor; I pulled these out of an E60 loom, but BMW do sell them. You also need the feed line between the pump and the rail, and a return line from the regulating valve (sans the 4-way connector, No. 9). It will make it easier if you get the lines to the injectors, but you can modify the originals to fit.

 

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You will also need a new gaskets for the pump and the oil-filter housing. That’s it for parts, everything else can be modified from the original.

You can get the CP1 out without removing the oil-filter housing, but you cannot get the CP3 in. So drain the oil and water before you start. The front most bolt on the oil-filter housing is a real bitch to get at with the CP3 in place, so remove the ducting for the fuel cooler too.

Cut the connector housing down on the fuel-control valve, as it will foul the hard water pipe that runs around the oil filter. I left the terminals in place, just bent flat, to test the valve (negative 5 V PWM), but you don’t need to operate this valve as the pressure will be regulated with the valve in the rail.


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The bracket supporting the power steering pump has to be modified as shown, and you need to do away with the top M6 bolt for the bracket.

 

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The pump can now go in, and the filter housing can go back in place. You have to put the front most bolt into the housing before you install it behind the pump, as there is no way to get the bolt past the pump otherwise. I ended up turning down a 3/4” socket to get enough clearance and purchase on the bolt.

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The rail can be fitted next. The tabs holding the rail to the head are 10 mm thinner on the new rail and only the front tab lines up. To get enough clearance for the pressure sensor I had to shift the rail back 15 mm, with respect to the front tab. The return-line banjo at the rear of the rail also has to clear a tab in the casting of the head. I made up two adaptor plates to mount the rail, using 10 mm sheet alloy, with one end drilled 8.5 mm for the bolt to the head, the other tapped M8 for the rail to be bolted to. The eye-to-eye of the adaptors was 15 mm at the front one, and 68 mm  at the middle. They were heavily ground to clear the castings of the rail and head. I couldn’t fit an adaptor for the rear most tab.

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With the rail in place, you can clock the sensor and regulator to clear the vacuum line and inlet manifold and rail-return line, respectively. Then wiring.


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The regulator in the rail replaces the regulator in the CP1, so you need to extend and reposition the wiring to the rear of the rail. The pressure sensor is now at the front of the rail, so these wires need extending too. I opened the splitter box on the block, and swapped the exit point for the regulator and sensor wires. The new sensor and regulator use the same wire numbering as the originals, making the connector swap pretty simple.

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Next fit the high pressure lines. These will take some careful bending to make sure they line up correctly. Test fit the inlet manifold, to make sure the lines clear. This was the longest part of the install. Hopefully, a set of E60 injector lines would fit better, but I only had the originals to hand.


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Put the water pipes back in place, as you will need to run the low-pressure fuel lines around these.


Now onto fuel feed. The are two return lines in the E39: one from the fuel cooler (which was fed by the pump) and one from the overpressure of the inlet line. Delete this:
 

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On the filling line from the filter, blank and overpressure return line, and connect the line to the inlet at the CP3 (front most); it will need trimming slightly. This will maximise pressure to the pump, +0.25 Bar in my case. An alternative would be to replace the overpressure valve with an after market option, I might pursue this later,  but I didn't see the need given the bypass in the CP3.

 

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The return line from the rail connects directly to the fuel cooler.

The original return line from CP1 can be reused, but needs to be run directly to the hard return line by the ECU. I extended the last section of 8 mm hose on this line to make a smoother curve.

You might want to reuse some other sections of hose at the pump return connection, to get a smoother line around the oil filter.

 

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That is everything, time to test. Leave the inlet manifold off, and look for leaks. Bleeding the rail may take some time. INPA is very useful to keep track of the pressures.

It will run without a remap, but the new pressure sensor will need coding in, and the injection table needs extending to include higher rail pressures.

Next, I am replacing the fuel-control valve with a dummy valve. Since the valve is only needed in the fully open position, I figure it should be easier porting a dummy than dismantling the valve and porting the plunger.


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Cheers

Edited by sinner

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Regarding deleting the dual return line: Why did you also remove the heat valve which regulates return flow either via cooler or directly to supply side of inline fuel pump? If you want to make sure that supply pressure is maximal just compress that return line from fuel filter line. Or replace the return line pressure regulating valve like you already suggested. 

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Hi Clavurion, thanks for the input. I agree this is not an ideal solution; I am looking into a new pressure regulator.  Just to make sure we are talking about the same part by the "return line from fuel filter" do you mean the left most end of 11?:

 

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Initially, I  did try to retain the preheating valve, with pump rail and injector returns all connected as in the E60. But, the pressure was still low. by clamping the hose at the regulator I saw the pressure increase to of 0.25 Bar, so I blanked the regulator. Admittedly, I didn't get as far as testing clamping the filter return line, as I assumed direct from filter would be the maximum the pre-supply could push.

 

I could reinstate the preheating valve for rail return (currently direct to cooler the tank), but I think I will need a new regulator. I will test clamping that line next weekend, thanks for the tip.


I  was also warned against running too high a pressure at the pump return, which is why I ended up connecting the  pump + injector return directly to the tank line. Although, I don't know what a safe value is for the pressure here. Any ideas?

Cheers
 

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Pressure regulator (red arrow) replaced with higher value unit or the same return line compressed right after that regulator. If fully compressed the situation would be like with a straight line from filter to HP pump.

 

image.png

Edited by Clavurion

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37 minutes ago, sinner said:

 

I  was also warned against running too high a pressure at the pump return, which is why I ended up connecting the  pump + injector return directly to the tank line. Although, I don't know what a safe value is for the pressure here. Any ideas?

 

By this you mean the uncooled return line to supply side of inline fuel pump? I don't understand what harm could it do to have a higher pressure on the incoming line of inline fuel pump compared to low pressure that in-tank fuel pump can produce?

 

 

E39_fuel_supply.png

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