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Another little oddity that I'd seen mentioned somewhere, compare the width of the drivers side foot well

 

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to the passenger side

 

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The drivers side is 2 1/2 inches wider and the seat 2 1/2 inches nearer the middle of the car then the passenger side.  Another reason for not making the car in RHD!

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What an incredible machine. That's a fascinating read, and the detail you've gone to with the pictures is superb. Thanks for sharing, it's passed a slow Tuesday night behind the bar in peaceful harmony!

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Front bonnet opening

 

So, with the engine in the middle you have a luggage compartment at the front, right?

 

Err, no!  The front is mainly full of radiator!

 

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Radiator, cooling duct, battery, fuse box, washer fluid, brake fluid reservoir and rather a lot of pipes!  If you put anything in there it would actually end up on the road as there is no bottom.

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GRP panels

 

All of the bodywork is GRP which is very high quality compared to other GRP car body panels I've seen.  There is very little give in any of the panels, unlike, for example, parts of the Z1 which are also GRP. As you can see from some of the previous pictures, where there are panels that you can see both sides of (front and rear openings, doors etc.), two pieces of GRP have been bonded together so that both sides show the gel coat.  The join between the parts is pretty much invisible. The panels appear to be very thick, at least 5mm and formed with significant detail.  In many places, just looking at it you'd think it was made of metal.

 

Here are a few close up shots of a couple of areas.

 

Rear edge of the front compartment door showing the bonding between top and bottom panels.

 

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Surround of the front compartment bodywork

 

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Rear of the door

 

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Rear edge of door jamb

 

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Front wheel arch and front bumper

 

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Thought I might cover the wheels too.

 

The wheels are unique to the M1, they are reported to be made of Magnesium, although they are quite heavy!  Considering they are only 16 inch, they weigh nearly as much as the 20 inch wheels on my M6!  The finish is quite rough, almost just a raw sand cast finish.  They are made by Campagnolo who made wheels for Lamborghini and Maserati at the time and now make high quality bike parts and wheels.  The wheels are 16 inch diameter, 7J with 205/55 tyres at the front, 8J with 225/50 tyres at the rear.  There is also a space saver wheel in the boot, this is an 18 inch rim and has a 105 width tyre - which no one now makes!   

 

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The Campagnolo logo is painted on the rim and on many cars I've seen this has come off.  It looks to me as though the radius of the curve of the logo is slightly too small for the location on the rim, as if it were a standard logo from a 15 inch wheel or designed to be positioned closer to the hub.

 

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The black centre of the wheel is just painted black with a plastic centre cap with the old monochrome BMW logo, similar to the one on the steering wheel boss.  This is a colour picture!

 

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The wheels don't have spokes as such, just what appear to be 5 sets of 4 slots.  Actually there are 5 sets of 3 slots, the bottom slot is just a recess painted black!

 

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Thanks for this thread Richard. An enigma of a car. One day I hope to see yours for real...

Edited by Neilb

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Lights

 

As mentioned previously, the rear clusters are from an E24.  They are however mounted on more solid gaskets, odd that on a metal bodied E24 they have foam gaskets that hold any moisture causing rust and on the GRP E26 they are rubber even though it wouldn't matter so much if they were wet!

 

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Front lights all bespoke from what I can tell, with all lenses and light housings being specific to the M1.

 

There are indicator repeaters on the front wings

 

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Integrated into the front bumper, there are indicators and driving/side lights left and right.  

 

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The clear lights are not fog lights, although they are a similar size and shape to many fog lights.  They have each have two small 5W side light bulbs and a single H3 55W halogen bulb,  These lights come on with the main beam and are also used when you flash the headlights when the main head light is off, presumably to reduce wear on the headlight mechanism.

 

The Dipped/Main beam lights have 60/55W H4 bulbs and are normally closed

 

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They pop up when the headlights are turned on.

 

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The kids think this is the coolest part of the car!  Being LHD only the lights have to be masked. I did get a set of what were supposed to be RHD lights, unfortunately what I got was another set of LHD lights in boxes that were for RHD lights!  At some point someone must have fitted them and put the original LHD lights in the RHD boxes.  At least I have a spare set of lights, they are as you might guess, NLA from BMW.

 

 

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Fab pics and detail, thanks for taking the time.

I'd imagine most are owned by collectors / investors rather than enthusiasts like yourself and would never notice or care about the details that make this car what it is. So ahead of its time.

Edited by rado16v

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That's about all I can think of to take pictures of at the moment, if anyone can think of an area or aspect I've not covered let me know and I'll see what I can do.

 

Now it's time to start replacing all the bits that are not 100%, some bits will be easier than others due to the availability of, or lack of, parts.

 

So far, since collecting the car from ML on 1st July, I've done the following :

 

- Fitted the ///M1 rear decal as shown previously.  What I have not said is what a pain it was to find, and how it goes to show the problems associated with getting parts.  I first sourced one from a guy in Germany, the decal came but it was just a clear sticker with ///M1 printed on it, also if you looked closely the width of the 3 stripes was different.  I assumed that this was not how they should be so started looking again.  I then found that you could still order them from BMW is you knew who to ask, so I did.  When it arrived it was a transfer type decal which was good, but there was no gap between the last /// and the M and again the widths of the /// were different!  The correct decal should have a small gap between the /// and M, be a transfer type not just a sticker and have the three /// the same width.  Here are the two decals side by side, the 'genuine BMW' part is on top.

 

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So, I then started enquiring where else I might be able to source the correctly specified part.  I contacted the BMW M1 owners club in the USA, the guy that runs the club had some New/Old stock and supplied an original, genuine decal which is the one you can see applied earlier in the thread.

 

- Fitted the new clock as shown previously.

 

- Replaced the spare wheel cover, the tab on the main zip was broken which made opening it very hard and there were several cuts in the leatherette fabric.

 

- Replaced the windscreen wiper blade, the edge of the blade was starting to split away and it wasn't very good at wiping the windscreen!

 

- Replaced the central boss on the steering wheel wit the old style BMW logo.

 

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- Thoroughly cleaned, fed and re-dyed the leather on the steering wheel.  It was absolutely filthy, or the original dye coat had perished.

 

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- Replaced the left side gas strut that holds the engine/boot compartment cover open.  In situ the old strut felt as though it was doing next to nothing, however having take it off it's still almost impossible to compress.  That compartment lid must be bloody heavy!  

 

- Replaced two rubber gaskets around the engine compartment cover catches.  These are a more complex shape than they first appear.  I was lucky to find what I believe are the last 5 new genuine parts worldwide (and at a very reasonable price of £10.18 each!).  I fitted 2, sent a pair to to the guy in the USA as a thank you for the ///M1 decal and have 1 spare.

 

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The old gasket (left obviously!) is perished, it feels more like Bakelite than rubber,  the cracks don't show up well in the picture, but pieces are almost dropping off.  It's also been damaged because it's not been aligned properly to the 'pin' from the compartment lid that goes through the middle.

 

New gasket installed and fed with seal feed.

 

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There is a metal plate that goes inside the gasket to hold it flat.

 

- Fitted a 'Use Genuine BMW Parts' sticker to the front compartment cover, quite ironic given the lack of genuine BMW parts available I thought!  Because the car has been resprayed most of the bodywork stickers are missing.  I have what I believe is a full set, it's just a question of finding out exactly where they should go! 

 

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Stickers that I have which still need applying are the Tyre Pressure sticker which I assume goes on the drivers door pillar, a battery disconnection warning sticker that must go somewhere near the battery and an engine running in sticker that goes somewhere on the windscreen.

 

 

 

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Bloody hell mate what a machine.

 

Love the car, the attention to detail and the fact you're also not afraid to use it.

 

Can't believe the fit and finish on the GRP either it looks superb

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Refurbished radio arrived from Germany, internals all sorted and the correct M1 specific bezel fitted.  Now it's fitted, together with the rotary fader control in the central cubby hole, the interior is now pretty much as it left the factory with everything working!

 

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The radio is pretty sophisticated for the time although it does not look it.  The central section at the top where it says 'Becker Mexico' is actually a button.  When you press it the radio scans for the next receivable station, the red mechanical needle moves as it scans, when it gets to the end it somehow snaps back and continues the scan from the start again.  The lever on the right (not very obvious on the picture) adjusts the sensitivity of the scan. 

 

One very small addition is an Aux in port which the refurb company added to the radio.  I think it's pretty discrete.

 

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It's just above the front compartment release handle, close up

 

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It's fairly basic, just overrides the audio whenever a jack is plugged in, but better then nothing.

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Something I thought of that falls into the quite interesting category.

 

The tool kit.

 

Car tool kits have reduced over the years, most modern cars don't even have one, except maybe a locking wheel nut key and a towing eye.

 

The M1 is old school.  The tool kit stows under the spare wheel in the boot.  It's in large roll up bag.

 

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Unroll the bag and you can see how comprehensive this tool kit is

 

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There is just about everything you need to do even some quite significant repairs.  Spanners, ratchet drive, pliers, wrench etc. etc.

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Boot, spare wheel etc.

 

The M1 boot is quite generous considering the car layout.  Apparently one of the design criteria was that the car should be capable of carrying luggage for two people for at least a weekend.

 

The space saver spare wheel is stowed on the right, inside a leatherette pouch.

 

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The spare wheel is supposed to be held in place by a long bolt with a wing nut attachment.  The larger hole on the top is supposed to be for threading the bolt through, the smaller hole is for access to the valve for checking the tyre pressure.   I've tried to attach it but there's no way it will fit.  The guy that runs the M1 owners club in the USA reckons that if you position the wheel just right and shove it as far to the right as possible then it will go, I tried that, it does not work!  It does actually sit in position pretty securely without the bolt.

 

There is a special set of M1 luggage that was designed to fit exactly in the available space. I've never seen an actual set, the closest I've come is the sales leaflet!

 

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The numbers written on the back next to each part number are presumably prices when new, I don't know what currency these are in, but I suspect it's £, the values are too low for dm. So that will be £816.84 for the set, back in 1980 plus VAT @ 15% I should imagine, so as near as damn it £940, that's £3,600 in today's money.

 

There are a couple of people that have a set, apparently it was advertised for the E12 M535i as well.

 

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If any one sees a set for sale, let me know!   :)

 

On the underside of the spare wheel pouch are two pockets

 

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You can also see the recess for the tool kit which lives under the spare wheel pouch. 

 

In the pockets are a fold out warning triangle and the first aid kit.

 

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The outer edge of the main cover has a zip when allows access to the spare wheel.  The wheel is a similar design to the regular wheels, but is 18 inch diameter rather than 16.

 

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The design may be a pointer to why the wheel can't be fastened down.  The owners manual shows a different wheel design, like this

 

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With this design the holes in the wheel are much larger and would give more room for the fastening bolt.

 

The space saver spare is a 105 R18, the size is no longer obtainable.  

 

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Nearest I can find is a 110 R18 which I think is used on the Jaguar S type.  I don't know if it would fit in the pouch, but I doubt I'd ever actually use a spare anyway.

Edited by RichardP

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Its threads like this that you look at, and realise that whatever attempts you are doing to your own car to make nice and OE, restoring bits or whatever, aren't really what you thought it was. In actual fact, what you and I are doing is simply playing at it. This is doing it properly.

 

I think getting a new petrol cap with the stringy bit on it to replace the old broken one is progress. Richard's having period radios rebuilt and looking at a luggage set thats probably one of about 20 left in the world

Well done Richard

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Its threads like this that you look at, and realise that whatever attempts you are doing to your own car to make nice and OE, restoring bits or whatever, aren't really what you thought it was. In actual fact, what you and I are doing is simply playing at it. This is doing it properly.

 

I think getting a new petrol cap with the stringy bit on it to replace the old broken one is progress. Richard's having period radios rebuilt and looking at a luggage set thats probably one of about 20 left in the world

Well done Richard

I nearly spat my tea out.. yes I am much the same "new badges and wheel caps" - Restored! Actually no.....

 

Superb detail as ever and very interesting, especially having a different spare wheel to what is shown in the brochure. If it were the other way round you could say it had got a replacement wheel but it certainly has not. Just out of interest, are all the other M1's in existence with a spare wheel the same design as yours or the one in the handbook?

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