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I saw that video.  No, it's not my car!

 

That car was at Don Law Racing when I was looking at mine, it's actually pretty rough.  It's been fedralised, look at the front bumper and indicators on the rear bumper, something funny with the interior of the bulkhead between the seats too.  When I saw it it had done a bit over 30,000 miles and Don was cursing it as the suspension was worn out and the parts were all NLA.  I'm sure he has the contacts and expertise to remanufacture bits, so maybe it's in better condition now than it was.  It was sold by Gooding and Company in the USA in 2012 and then by Hexagon in 2014.

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Fantastic stuff Richard - what a trip. Exactly what these cars were made for - fast continental blasts!

 

I am in Munich next May but flying for a weekend of frivolity - will do BMW Welt though!!

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A little over 2 months after dropping the car off at Munich Legends after the Munich trip, she finally arrived home again this morning.

 

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The main reason for leaving her at Munich Legends was to replace the suspension bushes, basically the 36 year old polyurethane had perished and they were dropping to pieces.   This is what they looked like after being taken out of the wishbones

 

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The Polyurethane was about the constancy of a wax crayon!

 

There are two different bushes used, 12 of one type for the front and upper rear wishbones and 8 of another for the lower rear wishbone.  The front/upper rear is still available, so I could use the OEM part. The lower rear bush however is NLA.  I say bush, the NLA part is more like a ball joint filled with Polyurethane.   Luckily I have the technical drawing and specification of the bush, however no one I approached was willing or able to make an exact replica.  Given the axis over which movement can occur, pretty much purely rotation about the axis of the bush, I decided that a simple poly bush was going to be more than adequate and definitely preferable to a deteriorating ball joint.  I found a company that would make up custom poly bushes, DuraFlex, and had them manufacture a couple of sets using the highest density Polyurethane available, 90D which is pretty much rock solid!

 

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While the suspension was apart I thought I might as well get the Bilstein shock absorbers refurbished and this is what has taken the time.  While waiting I had the wishbones re-painted too, so it all looks nice and new under there now, this is the only picture I have for now, I'll take more when I take the wheels off for cleaning.

 

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If you look closely, you'll notice that the top wishbone mounting point has been moved down.  At some point in the past the suspension geometry had been set to give the lowest possible ride height.  This proved to be a bit of a pain to live with, every sleeping policeman had to be negotiated with extreme care, to prevent grounding.  On the Munich trip, my co-driver coined the phrase "fatty out" every time a speed bump had to be crossed.  The geometry has now been set to the lowest within the factory spec range, which has meant raising it by about 20 mm.

 

A couple of other things were done, again while waiting. A new windscreen was fitted as the original had a small scratch and was just starting to de-laminate. The cooling system was flushed and antifreeze changed. The A/C fan was looked at and adjusted.  The door lock connecting rods were lengthened by about 10mm, no idea why they were short but they were, so the pins went a bit too far into the door card when locked.

 

So, now I just need to remove all the temporary wrap and give her a really good clean!

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What was done to the AC fan? 

The curve on one of the blades was fractionally different to the others probably

But seriously, with the attention to detail being lavished on this car it must be one of the best used M1's in the world by now which makes it one of the most desirable cars in the world to me! When I get the 6 numbers I will be making an unrefusable cash offer Richard

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20 hours ago, sharkfan said:

What was done to the AC fan? 

Taken apart and cleaned.  They said the bearing is a bit iffy, could be that's it's got crud in or just corroded a bit.  I probably won't know if it's any better until next year.  Might have to break out the spare fan I have!

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If it's a similar construction to the E24 then periodic greasing of the bearings can make them last and linger for years before their absolutely necessary replacement.

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That maybe what they have done, I only have a vague description on the invoice (with no charge against it), I'll ask them to see exactly what they did.  Any recommendations as to the best type of grease to use?

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Grease? It depends on how hard or how much hassle it is to get to; the E24 has a two fan set up with the ventilation fan in the engine bay with relatively easy access so that gets some fairly thick grease shoved in with a cotton bud or Mark I finger, the AC fan is behind the centre console and a 'mare to get to so gets a high power torch through the grill and a generous squirt of lithium grease in the best direction I can see.

 

Both methods work pretty well.

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Temporary wrap now removed.  Took longer to take off than to put on!  It did not help that it needs to be nice and warm for the adhesive and film to soften, it happened to be 2 degrees and snowing slightly which did not help!  The use of a 2Kw fan heater to heat up the film got it nice and soft but just took quite a long time.  

 

My two main worries were that either the glue would have marked the paint or that in removing it I'd pull off some of the paint with it.  Thankfully neither happened.

 

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It seems to have done it's job, in a couple of places there were small holes in the film where stones had hit, but no mark in the paint underneath

 

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Another small job that needed tackling was the rear view mirror.

 

There were two problems, first the design has a mirror and a piece of glass at a slightly different angle, the reflection from glass being used in dipped mode.  This means that there is a gap between the two and over the years the internal surfaces had become dirty just like the driving lights.  It's not so bad during the day, but at night with lights behind it creates a lot of glare.

 

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Having spoken to someone while in Munich, they said it was an easy job to take apart and clean.  I was a little nervous because the mirror is no longer available, the housing is made from 36 year old plastic that gets baked in the sun and is clipped together and the mirror has always been rather loose on it's swivel mounting.  That's the second problem, I've always suspected that there is probably some sort of plastic clamp inside that's cracked, so it still holds it firmly enough so it does not move while driving, but it's just a bit floppy. If I take it to pieces will it just fall apart in my hands!

 

So I warmed up the housing by placing my trusty fan heater in the car and went about opening it up.  Actually the plastic was very flexible and I could take it apart with just my fingers, the outer surround is just held in place with 4 barbed clips.  Sure enough, just as anticipated, the clamp for the swivel mount was cracked

 

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So, first question, try to fix it or leave it as is?  It looks as though the clamp piece, which is part of the dipping mechanism, is just held in place with 4 clips. Should I un-clip them and risk not being able to put it together again or not?  In the end I chickened out!  Due to the soft nature of the plastic I think it would be near impossible to mend the cracked piece.  I decided to use a more Heath Robinson fix, cable ties!

 

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It's now a little more solid and should not get any worse.

 

Here are the mirror and covering glass removed from the housing

 

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Both the interior surface of the glass and the mirror were quite grimy, difficult to see in the picture above, but after wiping a small section on the glass and mirror you can see how dirty they were

 

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All put back together again 

 

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Edited by RichardP

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Finishing touches on the refurbished wheels, the Campagnolo logo.  I decided to go with a vinyl transfer in the end.  I tried using a paint through stencil, but the combination of the slightly rough and curved surface meant that it was almost impossible to get nice sharp edges.  I put a couple of coats of Gtechniq C5 over the transfer to help seal the edges and give additional protection.

 

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Side by side with the original on the car

 

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Starting to clean various bits, it's amazing how much crap from the exhaust gasses has managed to get in between the top of the rear wing and the underside of the engine compartment lid.

 

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Both the cover and the top of the wing were covered in this brown varnish that required polishing to get off.  Oddly, most of the rear of the car was free of it, there was some just above the rear light cluster, must just be some effect of the rear airflow that sucks the exhaust gas into the small void between the panels above the exhaust.

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Drivers side suspension is now cleaned up, here are a couple of pictures

 

Front, the adjustment clip on the shock is now 4 from the bottom and not right at the bottom.

 

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Rear

 

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Due to the number of flies stuck in the gaps between the bumper, grill and lights, I took the grill and lights out to get access.  This shows the location of the horn (all three of them) and the smaller of the cooling fans together with the position of the headlight when retracted.  Only the drivers side done for now.

 

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Passenger side awaits the same treatment.

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Fortunately the set I picked up, although in worse condition, were significantly less than 1/4 of that even including the refurb cost. 

 

Those wheels look look to be in basically good condition, but they are obviously very well used and need a refurb so they do look to be on the expensive side.  They don't come up for sale often though, so if you don't have the original wheels you don't have a lot of choice and may increase the value of the car by more than their cost.

 

There is a guy in Germany who has a new set, although even those seem to have a few small dings. He wanted €30,000 when I asked him.

 

 

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These are two of the new set that are for sale in Germany, look at the 2 O'Clock and 7 O'Clock rim on the right wheel, looks a bit scuffed to me.  Also note the typical Italian attention to detail in positioning the logo!

 

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