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Found 3 results

  1. From the album: My 523i Conversions and Maintenance

    Wishful thinking? This is what I would like to see on my speedo Actually, this is one of two Ohm resistant measurements for one of the steering wheel flap/pad, the up shift gives you a Ohm reading of 1008 Ohm with the resistors on the electrical boards in the flaps. That is why I had to remove the two tiny 2mm (if I remember right, then I think it was 2 resistors on one of them and only 1 on the other) resistors on each circuit board to fully separate the connection to get two clear signal-poles for up and downshift with less than 0.04 Ohm. All bells and whistles worked fully as intended on the steering wheel, that is, both paddles work the same way. When you pull on the flap it shifts into a higher gear and push on the top for downshifting. It was my chose to have it this way but I could easily have made a split, so that one paddle would have a downshift and vice versa. This a modified SSG that looks like SMG wheel with two stage airbag, paddle shift, steering wheel that is fully functional without any red warning lights on a one stage e39 from '97 that was borne/manufactured with one stage air bag steering wheel and no flaps. You can read more about the resistors with picture; #7 SSG-Circuit Board For The Flaps You can read more about two stage wheels vs. one stage with other pictures to.
  2. V_MAX

    SSG -SMG/Bastard_With 14 Functions

    From the album: My 523i Conversions and Maintenance

    There are more than one reason I chose to buy this steering wheel....you can see the steering wheel inside the car hear; SSG-SMG Steering Wheel With Flaps in e39 from Feb.1997-/04.04.2021 First of all, I wanted a steering wheel that looked like an SMG wheel but didn't like the flap design with these long pointy or thin flaps with + and - and then again I didn't like the SSG steering wheel, because the spoke pointing down is split into two with a gap in it, but the flaps have a nice sophisticated design and you have the option of up or downshift on both "flaps" individually from each other, that you can not on a SMG steering wheel, as far as know. So, what can you do? When I found this not so original two stage airbag (my car is a one stage) steering wheel on eBay in Germany, I could see that it was originally an SSG steering wheel but it had been altered to look like an SMG by filling in the hole on the downward spokes with resin or glue and then used the cover plate from SMG. After that, they covered it with a carbon film that actually is an immaculate work that you can not put a finger on (no pun intended) and it blends well in with the rest of the steering wheel. The things I like about this steering wheel are; the steering wheel is ever so slightly flattened at the bottom under side and the seams on the upper half are horizontal, instead of just going around the rim, that is a nice professional workmanship and probably not easy to do. Beside the overall look, then this steering wheel has all the functions you can put on one steering wheel inc. changing gears with the "flaps" that actually do not look like any cheep flaps but more like finger size buttons when looked at, head on. I can tell you that it was not cheep, but it did fulfill all my wishes and drain my wallet a little bit.
  3. V_MAX

    #5 SSG/SMG Steering Wheel

    That is how it looks after I fixed the clock spring to the steering wheel. This clock has two brass contact rings on it and most likely yours have only black plastic. Those two rings are originally used for a a steering wheel that was headed. Now, instead of using these contacts for heading the steering wheel I use them as two contacts to send appropriate signals to the automatic through two carbon brushes that are mounted in a small hole or loop-fastener behind the clock spring, "#6 SSG/SMG Steering Wheel Contacts" one for up shift and one for down shift. One thing you should be aware of: it is imperative to mount the clock spring exactly the same as the old one, otherwise your tun signal might not come of at the right time or possibly not at all. You might think that the middle part of the clock spring with the brass pointing up should be straight in the middle, pointing 90° up but actually it should be more like 94° or 4° to the right. If you are thinking that you can just put the steering wheel a little bit crooked on to correct this, then remember you have to get the car front wheels realigned. It is much easier to simply grind away the aluminum epoxy and start again.
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