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DepthHoar

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  1. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  2. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  3. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  4. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Fish in Lesson learned at the dealers....   
    Mahle/Knecht make excellent filters, normally made in Germany or Austria.
     
    The correct Mahle/Knecht oil filter for the E39 M5 is OX152 / 1D Eco.
     
    Other filters for reference:
     
    Mahle/Knecht air filter is LX 422
     
    Fuel filter - KL 104
     
    Cabin filter - LAK 73/S (activated charcoal)
     
    Mahle say they do an M5 thermostat too, although I think it's a Behr one - part no. TX 37 79
  5. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in M5 Written off - valuation ?   
    If you're thinking of trading down to a 530d then accepting £5425 ( + the remains of the M5) would be OK.
     
    But....there are a few things to think about. Do you have space on your driveway to keep a car & break it bit by bit for the next couple of months? Also, if you do have space do you really want a car up on bricks cluttering up your driveway? Factor in additional cost - how much will it cost to flatbed the M5 back to your place?
     
    I scrapped a Saab 900 once and it sat on my driveway for ages while I faffed around stripping it and selling parts. We're really rural and have space but the place ended up looking a bit pikey after a while. My wife never forgave me! I did OK on it financially but it was an almighty pain.
     
    If the insurance company are offering you nearly £9k (am I right in assuming that??) why not take that and get yourself a really good 530d + money to spend. Or, buy another M5? 
  6. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from M5Wrexham in Battery finally bit the bullet   
    Get a price from your local BMW dealer parts dept., sometimes they can be competitive.
     
    Still on my original battery - MY 2001. It's plugged into a smart charger/conditioner over the winter which helps preserve its useful life.
  7. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Dotcom1970 in Best manufacturer for front wheel hub/bearing housing   
    Try FAG. They're a OE supplier to BMW and make a high quality product. Here:
     
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BMW-5-SERIES-E39-FAG-FRONT-WHEEL-HUB-BEARING-KIT-FOR-ABS-31221093427-/251693026344?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&fits=Car+Make%3ABMW%7CPlat_Gen%3AE39&hash=item3a9a12cc28
     
    Hope this helps.
  8. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in brake judder still   
    A subject that is close to my heart and which I recently solved.

    Just had a look at the 'troubleshooting' section of the BMW TIS.

    Firstly, is the judder through the brake pedal only, steering wheel only, or both?

    TIS as follows on 'Pulsating effect on brake pedal':

    CAUSE
    1) Wheel-bearing play excessive
    2) Brake disc not aligned with fist caliper
    3) Brake disc runout
    4) Excessive thickness deviation within braking surface.

    REMEDY
    1) Replace wheel bearings
    2) Check floating caliper installation
    3) Replace brake discs
    4) Measure brake disc thickness. Grind or replace discs

    BMW TIS 'Troubleshooting on front axle':

    FAULT
    Vibration

    CAUSE
    1) Wheels imbalanced
    2) Rims have lateral/radial runout
    3)Tires have radial runout

    REMEDY
    1) Balance wheel
    2) Replace rims if necessary
    3) Match or replace tyres

    also:-

    FAULT
    Steering wheel shake

    CAUSE
    1) Wheels imbalanced
    2) Rims have lateral/radial runout
    3) Shock absorber effect insufficient
    4) Pressure rod bearing defective
    5) Excessive backlash on steering gear
    6) Traction strut bearing defective

    REMEDY
    1) Balance wheels
    2) Replace rims if necessary
    3) Replace shock absorber
    4) Replace traction strut mount
    5) Determine pressure point and replace steering gear
    6) Replace traction strut bearing.

    My own issues with brake vibration were solved by a simple but fairly long-winded brake bedding in procedure, but considered all of the above at one time or another.

    On a previous occasion I had odd noises/minor vibrations at certain speeds from tyres on the front axle (Bridgestone SO2, from memory) with about 3-4mm of tread left on them. New rubber up front made all that go away.

    (A buckled wheel - only slightly buckled - on my 530d also induced some vibration which also went away when changed to a rounder rim.)

    I notice from your posting that the front brakes were replaced fairly recently. Might be worth checking the installation of what BMW call the 'fist' caliper. Rear discs, as you say, could be another suspect as well?

    The two struts mentioned in the TIS will be the bent one (one of the usual suspects for vibration), and the straight one which normally gives fewer issues. Re. the bent arm: well worth changing the whole unit rather than just the rubber hydro bearing since there's a ball joint on the end of it that can wear; others have mentioned this above.

    How's your steering? Still precise and 'sharp'? Any little knocks over small potholes? Maybe also the source of some vibration through the steering wheel under braking? Outer tie rods worn? The centre tie rod normally gives fewer problems (allegedly!) but one of the ball joints on it can wear faster than the others, which was certainly the case on mine. Also, the single bush on the pitman arm (or is it the idler arm...I get confused...anyway, the one with a rubber/metal bush on it) may be giving problems too.

    There's a lot to consider, including wheel bearings.

    God, these cars can be frustrating...!
     
    (Edited to remove unexpected emoticons)
  9. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Been thinking about the M5 in Perth, any one seen it?   
    The '03 plate, is it the black one in Lothian on AT @ £7.2k?
     
    Remember, always buy on condition.
     
    If you're still in the market, why not look at both in one trip? Really important to see a few before you pull the trigger. 
     
    Price, age and mileage are not always the best indicators for potential purchasers: condition & provenance is everything when evaluating these cars. Also, good to see a few so you get a feel for the market before you commit.
  10. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Been thinking about the M5 in Perth, any one seen it?   
    Not seen the car (although not that far away from me) but for that price I would expect the bodywork to more or less spotless. 
     
    The clutch. Depends on how it's been driven. If driven gently throughout its life then the original clutch may be OK, although it would have been a distinct plus if it had been changed. Maybe this is where there is room for some negotiation on price?
     
    Tyres are expensive for a set so if they're 'Linglong Ditchfinders' or whatever, then there's room for manoeuvre on price too? The alloys ought to be immaculate at that price point and be BMW Shadow Chrome, not budget silver (approx £450 for a full set of 4 refurb at Lepsons in Shadow Chrome or equivalent)
     
    Price. It is a facelift car and these do seem to attract a premium nowadays so £8900 for a 130k mile car may be OK but there will be room to negotiate, I think. Much depends on the car's overall condition and maintenance history - these are key and the most important factors in valuing M//vehicles. I'd want a big, thick file of receipts for that sort of money & an immaculate body and interior.
     
    Spec. Don't get too hung up of the spec of the nav, ICE etc. - very much old school equipment now, down to personal preference and can be retrofitted if required. The Mk4 nav is now comparatively clunky to use in comparison to a £100 Garmin-thing from Halfords that you stick on the windscreen. The car is all about that engine and the driving dynamics....and crucially whether money has been spent on maintaining both of those. At that mileage I would like to see a lot of evidence of suspension work having been carried out because if it hasn't then you'll be spending anything up £1500- £2000 sorting it out in the first few months of ownership.
     
    For comparison purposes, I bought a 2001 facelift last summer in LMB with black leather, titanium trim & 77k miles for what amounted to £9K (it came with a host of take away extras - extra set of brand new Style 65 alloys, extra tyres,  BMW car cover etc., so total was £10.1k). It was/is immaculate with extensive and fully documented history. Values of the facelift cars have risen since last summer.
     
    As an alternative, there's proper value to be had with pre-facelift cars and some very nice ones have been for sale recently. They have all the driving virtues of the face lift cars and the ones I saw in the small ads had proper maintenance histories as well, although of course there were some tatty, marginal cars too.
     
    When buying mine I sifted through several Scottish cars and most of them had been well and truly eaten by the road salt in crucial areas on the car. If it's been a daily driver then it would be worth having a very careful look at the condition of the jacking points. The E39s are well known for 'cosmetic' rusting in other areas too but these are not car killers like the jacking points can be.
     
    Hope this helps.
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