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DepthHoar

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  1. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in Reconditioned Sachs shocks.   
    The 'beat on the street' over on M5board on this issue seems to be that springs get changed every other damper change. How true that is in reality I don't know, but I'm going to give it a go.
  2. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Valve Cover Gaskets - Ebay?   
    Recently bought a Behr thermostat & Elring thermostat seal.
     
    As far as I could find out Elring are OE suppliers to BMW.
     
    That eBay price is a very good one.....as long as it actually is Elring that is supplied.
  3. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Dotcom1970 in Best manufacturer for front wheel hub/bearing housing   
    Try FAG. They're a OE supplier to BMW and make a high quality product. Here:
     
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BMW-5-SERIES-E39-FAG-FRONT-WHEEL-HUB-BEARING-KIT-FOR-ABS-31221093427-/251693026344?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&fits=Car+Make%3ABMW%7CPlat_Gen%3AE39&hash=item3a9a12cc28
     
    Hope this helps.
  4. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    Grease should go on the adjustment thread at either end of the centre tie rod before the outer tie rods are threaded on - coat the thread completely. BMW TIS says 'special grease'...whatever that is..
     
    TIS specifically recommends no grease used on any other component or mating surface when replacing centre / outer tie rods / idler arm / pitman arm.
     
    (Just as an aside. Realoem.com has mistakenly reversed the labelling of the idler and Pitman arm. Official BMW TIS has them labelled the other way round.)
     
     
    Torque values: (Use new nuts in each case)
     
    Either end of idler arm - 62nm (bush end) & 65nm;
     
    Pitman arm - 61nm (clamp bolt but at steering gear end) & 65nm
     
    Tie rod end clamping nuts - 51nm
     
    Tie rod end to steering knuckle - 65nm
     
    Hope this helps!
  5. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    To dispel doubt, these are the centre and outer tie rods that came off my M5 last year and were BMW OE, as fitted at the factory...aka TRW:-


  6. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    £104 for the TRW centre tie rod sounds great. 
     
    Outer tie rods - TRW or Lemforder? Either of those two - have a slight preference for Lemforder but I'm maybe splitting hairs? Whichever is cheaper?
  7. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    I've used these people for TRW stuff in the past and found them good. Here's the TRW centre tie rod:
     
    http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/0126-steering/1117064-bmw-trw-center-drag-link-jcy105.html
     
    ...which is £70 more than the Febi one on the Allgermanparts website. TRW are the OE suppliers of centre tie rods for the E39 M5 but there's quite a price differential.....£168 TRW vs £75 Febi. Either will be cheaper than one from Cotswold BMW (circa £200 delivered and it will be a TRW part they'll be sending to you).
     
    I'd go with the TRW centre tie rod myself from Incarmotorfactors, but then I like to keep things that are not service or consumable items as OE as possible. Your priorities may be different.
     
    Outer tie rods for me would be Lemforder or TRW, in that order, but again it's a personal choice.
  8. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    I've used these people for TRW stuff in the past and found them good. Here's the TRW centre tie rod:
     
    http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/0126-steering/1117064-bmw-trw-center-drag-link-jcy105.html
     
    ...which is £70 more than the Febi one on the Allgermanparts website. TRW are the OE suppliers of centre tie rods for the E39 M5 but there's quite a price differential.....£168 TRW vs £75 Febi. Either will be cheaper than one from Cotswold BMW (circa £200 delivered and it will be a TRW part they'll be sending to you).
     
    I'd go with the TRW centre tie rod myself from Incarmotorfactors, but then I like to keep things that are not service or consumable items as OE as possible. Your priorities may be different.
     
    Outer tie rods for me would be Lemforder or TRW, in that order, but again it's a personal choice.
  9. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in Is 7 owners too many?   
    Would be interesting to see if the vehicle came with receipts/invoices to support the stamps in the service book.
     
    "Servicing", fundamentally, is the changing of fluids and filters (possibly not even had plugs changed at that mileage) + some visual inspection. Do main dealers do this "better" than an BMW indi or clued-up general garage? It's not rocket science. The dealer will have used the correct (and over-priced) service items, but other garages are perfectly capable of using the right (cheaper) stuff if you have chosen your spannerman carefully.
     
    The main dealer should be able to carry out the inspection side of servicing since they claim to have insight and knowledge of all BMW models. However, the reality can sometimes be quite different. Of course BMW dealers can do a good job, but there is a sizeable minority of M5 owners out there who have found that not to be the case.
     
    If you intend to keep the car and it's got loads of proper receipts to back up the service book stamps then it may not matter if the stamps come with the official BMW logo. (Resale may be more difficult later since buyers, rightly or wrongly, like to see FBMWSH.)
     
    One of the most critical services is the very first one: really important that this wasn't missed.
     
    The most important thing I'd want to see is evidence of maintenance, in particular the changing of critical suspension & steering components, numerous sensors and maybe parts of the running gear, clutch etc. etc. (Be good to see some work had been done on the brakes but they're service items, really, albeit expensive ones.)
     
    Maintenance contributes significantly to condition. And condition is everything with these cars. Buy on condition.
  10. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in Is 7 owners too many?   
    Would be interesting to see if the vehicle came with receipts/invoices to support the stamps in the service book.
     
    "Servicing", fundamentally, is the changing of fluids and filters (possibly not even had plugs changed at that mileage) + some visual inspection. Do main dealers do this "better" than an BMW indi or clued-up general garage? It's not rocket science. The dealer will have used the correct (and over-priced) service items, but other garages are perfectly capable of using the right (cheaper) stuff if you have chosen your spannerman carefully.
     
    The main dealer should be able to carry out the inspection side of servicing since they claim to have insight and knowledge of all BMW models. However, the reality can sometimes be quite different. Of course BMW dealers can do a good job, but there is a sizeable minority of M5 owners out there who have found that not to be the case.
     
    If you intend to keep the car and it's got loads of proper receipts to back up the service book stamps then it may not matter if the stamps come with the official BMW logo. (Resale may be more difficult later since buyers, rightly or wrongly, like to see FBMWSH.)
     
    One of the most critical services is the very first one: really important that this wasn't missed.
     
    The most important thing I'd want to see is evidence of maintenance, in particular the changing of critical suspension & steering components, numerous sensors and maybe parts of the running gear, clutch etc. etc. (Be good to see some work had been done on the brakes but they're service items, really, albeit expensive ones.)
     
    Maintenance contributes significantly to condition. And condition is everything with these cars. Buy on condition.
  11. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Mondial Extended Warranty   
    What the guy at Mondial really means: "I've reduced the premium to you, sir, because I'm on a commission-only salary, I've not sold anything this week and I'm desperate to sell this policy."
     
     
    Look at the whole proposition this way over, say, 3 years:
     
    Option 1.
    Spend £1600 on a warranty per year
    Spend £1000 on maintenance/servicing per year.
    Total over 3 years: £7800
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Possibly/possibly not
     
    Option 2.
    No warranty
    Spend £2500 a year on preventative maintenance/intensive servicing.
    Total over 3 years: £7500
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Probably.
     
    Overall: £300 ahead of the game + a more reliable car (probably) + one that has maintained its performance and handling edge.
     
    What about the risk of catastrophic vanos/engine/gearbox failure?
     
    Firstly, the engine & drivetrain is robust and good for 200k miles if cared for, and total failure rare in these examples. Yes, there might be rod bearing issues, VANOS and timing chain guides to contend with later in the car's life but warranty companies are likely to call 'wear & tear' on those. Clutch & flywheel? Dampers?...(it's a long list)...the warranty company will almost certainly close the door on you. Remember, there's also a £250 excess every time you make a claim, too.
     
    Also, if your're the sort of person willing to commit to £6000 of maintenance over 3yrs then you're definitely a fussy, enthusiastic owner who takes proper care of their car. The chances of catastrophic failure will be less, a lot less probably, than a Drift-King who runs the car on a shoestring and rags the arse off it at every opportunity hastening poor functionality and early demise of the vehicle. 
     
    This maintenance-instead-of-warranty approach won't suit everybody. A lot will depend on your approach to risk and how deep your pockets are. There'll be some careful risk-averse owners who will choose a warranty as well as spending big on maintenance. If money's not an issue then why not? 
  12. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Mondial Extended Warranty   
    What the guy at Mondial really means: "I've reduced the premium to you, sir, because I'm on a commission-only salary, I've not sold anything this week and I'm desperate to sell this policy."
     
     
    Look at the whole proposition this way over, say, 3 years:
     
    Option 1.
    Spend £1600 on a warranty per year
    Spend £1000 on maintenance/servicing per year.
    Total over 3 years: £7800
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Possibly/possibly not
     
    Option 2.
    No warranty
    Spend £2500 a year on preventative maintenance/intensive servicing.
    Total over 3 years: £7500
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Probably.
     
    Overall: £300 ahead of the game + a more reliable car (probably) + one that has maintained its performance and handling edge.
     
    What about the risk of catastrophic vanos/engine/gearbox failure?
     
    Firstly, the engine & drivetrain is robust and good for 200k miles if cared for, and total failure rare in these examples. Yes, there might be rod bearing issues, VANOS and timing chain guides to contend with later in the car's life but warranty companies are likely to call 'wear & tear' on those. Clutch & flywheel? Dampers?...(it's a long list)...the warranty company will almost certainly close the door on you. Remember, there's also a £250 excess every time you make a claim, too.
     
    Also, if your're the sort of person willing to commit to £6000 of maintenance over 3yrs then you're definitely a fussy, enthusiastic owner who takes proper care of their car. The chances of catastrophic failure will be less, a lot less probably, than a Drift-King who runs the car on a shoestring and rags the arse off it at every opportunity hastening poor functionality and early demise of the vehicle. 
     
    This maintenance-instead-of-warranty approach won't suit everybody. A lot will depend on your approach to risk and how deep your pockets are. There'll be some careful risk-averse owners who will choose a warranty as well as spending big on maintenance. If money's not an issue then why not? 
  13. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in Diff oil from the Dealer.   
    LSD oil:
    I agree, it can all be a bit confusing. If the diff on your E39 M5 is functioning normally and not noisy then just go with the Castrol Syntrax Limited Slip 75W-140: it's cheaper and it's officially approved by BMW. If your limited slip diff is noisy then some on the M5board suggest adding a little additional 'friction modifier', which is available in very small bottles from Opie Oils. The friction modifier increases lubricity and will marginally degrade the function of the limited slip differential, depending on how much you put in.....but make the diff quieter.
     
    Have a look at this M5board thread on diff oil, it should give a little more clarity:
    http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/136567-bmw-synthetic-diff-fluid.html
     
    I definitely wouldn't be paying silly money for the BMW OE LSD oil, 'FM Booster' or no.
     
    My advice would be: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just use the Castrol stuff as outlined above.
    (Re-reading the BMW TIS I notice it recommends that the contents of whichever diff oil bottle should be thoroughly mixed/shaken before use.)
     
    Gear box oil:
    I tried chasing down the manufacture of the stuff that goes in the E39 M5 gearbox to see if they sell it on the after-market at a lower price. I think it's made by Exxon-Mobil (Esso) but was left grasping at straws and can't be sure.
     
    So, you're stuck with buying it from BMW or chancing your arm with Royal Purple/Red Line/etc as used by quite a few on the M5board. There are multiple very long threads, with a whole variety of different opinions and conclusions about respective benefits/disadvantages of using the different oils. Reading them will do your head in: it did for mine!
     
    The lowest risk option is to go with the BMW OE stuff labelled MTF-LT-2 (according to BMW TIS this supercedes MTF-LT-1) and can be used in all E39 M5 gearboxes. The downside is the cost. Only available in 5 litre containers if bought mail-order for......£103.97, which is what I paid last year for it via Cotswold, and you'll have about half of it left over after the oil change. Some have had luck in the past going to a dealer in person and buying the exact amount from the parts department (bring-an-empty-bottle sort of thing).
     
    I just didn't want to take a chance as I decided the gear box oil may be one of the very few service items that are 'captive parts' (like the BMW-only Sachs dampers). Normally, I'm happy to use after-market, but 'BMW-approved', fluids since they are much cheaper than the BMW OE equivalent....but not in the case of gear box oil, unfortunately.
  14. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in Diff oil from the Dealer.   
    LSD oil:
    I agree, it can all be a bit confusing. If the diff on your E39 M5 is functioning normally and not noisy then just go with the Castrol Syntrax Limited Slip 75W-140: it's cheaper and it's officially approved by BMW. If your limited slip diff is noisy then some on the M5board suggest adding a little additional 'friction modifier', which is available in very small bottles from Opie Oils. The friction modifier increases lubricity and will marginally degrade the function of the limited slip differential, depending on how much you put in.....but make the diff quieter.
     
    Have a look at this M5board thread on diff oil, it should give a little more clarity:
    http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/136567-bmw-synthetic-diff-fluid.html
     
    I definitely wouldn't be paying silly money for the BMW OE LSD oil, 'FM Booster' or no.
     
    My advice would be: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just use the Castrol stuff as outlined above.
    (Re-reading the BMW TIS I notice it recommends that the contents of whichever diff oil bottle should be thoroughly mixed/shaken before use.)
     
    Gear box oil:
    I tried chasing down the manufacture of the stuff that goes in the E39 M5 gearbox to see if they sell it on the after-market at a lower price. I think it's made by Exxon-Mobil (Esso) but was left grasping at straws and can't be sure.
     
    So, you're stuck with buying it from BMW or chancing your arm with Royal Purple/Red Line/etc as used by quite a few on the M5board. There are multiple very long threads, with a whole variety of different opinions and conclusions about respective benefits/disadvantages of using the different oils. Reading them will do your head in: it did for mine!
     
    The lowest risk option is to go with the BMW OE stuff labelled MTF-LT-2 (according to BMW TIS this supercedes MTF-LT-1) and can be used in all E39 M5 gearboxes. The downside is the cost. Only available in 5 litre containers if bought mail-order for......£103.97, which is what I paid last year for it via Cotswold, and you'll have about half of it left over after the oil change. Some have had luck in the past going to a dealer in person and buying the exact amount from the parts department (bring-an-empty-bottle sort of thing).
     
    I just didn't want to take a chance as I decided the gear box oil may be one of the very few service items that are 'captive parts' (like the BMW-only Sachs dampers). Normally, I'm happy to use after-market, but 'BMW-approved', fluids since they are much cheaper than the BMW OE equivalent....but not in the case of gear box oil, unfortunately.
  15. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in rear discs and pads   
    Totally agree with this /\
     
    New Apec pads and discs on both axles on my Vauxhall Combo van had to be replaced after 18 months and less than 20k miles of pretty gentle driving. Sections of metal had sort of spalled off the front discs making the van shudder alarmingly under the lightest braking. Rear discs were in not as bad but still pretty shocking state. Well worth avoiding anything Apec.
  16. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Oil, oil, oil - 128k miles...   
    Hi Mike,
     
    0w40 probably won't kill your engine as long as it's a proper fully synthetic but you might find oil consumption goes up a bit, possibly quite a lot if yours is a pre-facelift with the original piston ring set up. Be interesting to know how you get on using the 0W40: it'll be an interesting experiment. There's quite a few M5board members using that grade of oil without ill effect.
     
    This engine oil debate will just keep meandering on and on though. I stick to 10W60 since it's what BMW specify (allegedly...depending on which forum thread you believe).
     
    My main gripe with using 10W60 to a BMW spec is the cost of the stuff. I stepped around the issue by using Shell Helix Ultra Racing which "meets or exceeds" the BMW spec (I know...weasel words) but I could buy it for circa £3.50 a litre in 20 litre drums. It's also conforms to a Ferrari spec so I'm reasonably sure it's OK for the Beast (similar high revving, multi-valve..yadda, yadda). 
     
    I think there's a member on this forum who runs their M5 on generic 5W30 fully synthetic and has done for some time. Would be good to know how he has got on.
  17. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  18. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  19. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from alpinewhite525 in Does anyone know of these 2 M5s?   
    Don't know them but both look interesting cars. However, you really should be buying on condition not colour or trim options.
     
    The blue car is definitely a facelift version, and they can attract better prices, but the black one may also be a facelift version depending on it's build date.
     
    The blue car is advertised with a "full service history"; you'll need to find out what that really means ie. has there been any 'maintenance' done like the replacement of innumerable sensors, brakes, suspension parts, steering stuff, clutch etc.? If it has thick file of receipts showing what work was done & by whom then all well & good.
     
    If it hasn't, and you may have to spend loads on it soon after purchase to bring it up to scratch. Spending circa £3k a week after buying it is not beyond the bounds of possibility. If a lot of the essential maintenance (not just servicing) has already been done by the previous owner than that will be a real bonus and make it a better prospective buy. Dig deep and ask a lot of questions about what work has been done & you want evidence of it having been carried out. A car with a lot of documented history will also be easier to sell on later, too. (Just looking at the pictures I notice one of the brake discs looks well past its best. Just replacing new pads and discs front and rear will cost £800 - £1000, depending on who does the work and where the parts come from.)
     
    The black car has a few more miles on it but ignore mileage and concentrate on condition. The ad shouts pretty loud about a lot of maintenance work (with documentation) which should be a good thing. However, check to see if it's a facelift car or not because if it's not then that will be a lever to force a better deal. The pre-facelift cars will give you all the performance of later cars but their market prices can be lower. General rule of thumb is that a good and well maintained early car will be better than a so-so facelift car. Price-wise, the market doesn't favour early cars but they can be a great buy as long as their condition is good.
     
    It's great to have two to compare. Assessing them from photos is difficult because both look good! These cars can rust, the most serious of which might be around the jacking points. Have a really close look because they hide it well without covers, rubber inserts etc coming off. Sorting the jacking points can be expensive (though someone got their's done for about £500, which seems unrealistically cheap and may be mates rates). 
     
    See how they both drive. They should track arrow straight on the road and not tram-line, shimmy or judder under braking. Any of those problems and you're probably into a few £££, or worse. Drive it in 3rd gear at 40mph and press the Sport button: there should be a definite bump/surge as the throttle sensitivity sharpens and the steering weights up. If it doesn't do this then the MAFs, cam sensors (up to 4 to replace), lambda sensors (x4, but might get away with renewing 2), thermostat & other stuff may be past their best = £££+. These cars should give massive shove above 3500-4000 revs in 3rd or 4th.
     
    Enjoy! But go into ownership with your eyes wide open. As DirtyHarry said somewhere else, it's depreciation or maintenance: choose one.
  20. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Fish in Lesson learned at the dealers....   
    Mahle/Knecht make excellent filters, normally made in Germany or Austria.
     
    The correct Mahle/Knecht oil filter for the E39 M5 is OX152 / 1D Eco.
     
    Other filters for reference:
     
    Mahle/Knecht air filter is LX 422
     
    Fuel filter - KL 104
     
    Cabin filter - LAK 73/S (activated charcoal)
     
    Mahle say they do an M5 thermostat too, although I think it's a Behr one - part no. TX 37 79
  21. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in M5 Written off - valuation ?   
    If you're thinking of trading down to a 530d then accepting £5425 ( + the remains of the M5) would be OK.
     
    But....there are a few things to think about. Do you have space on your driveway to keep a car & break it bit by bit for the next couple of months? Also, if you do have space do you really want a car up on bricks cluttering up your driveway? Factor in additional cost - how much will it cost to flatbed the M5 back to your place?
     
    I scrapped a Saab 900 once and it sat on my driveway for ages while I faffed around stripping it and selling parts. We're really rural and have space but the place ended up looking a bit pikey after a while. My wife never forgave me! I did OK on it financially but it was an almighty pain.
     
    If the insurance company are offering you nearly £9k (am I right in assuming that??) why not take that and get yourself a really good 530d + money to spend. Or, buy another M5? 
  22. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from M5Wrexham in Battery finally bit the bullet   
    Get a price from your local BMW dealer parts dept., sometimes they can be competitive.
     
    Still on my original battery - MY 2001. It's plugged into a smart charger/conditioner over the winter which helps preserve its useful life.
  23. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Dotcom1970 in Best manufacturer for front wheel hub/bearing housing   
    Try FAG. They're a OE supplier to BMW and make a high quality product. Here:
     
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BMW-5-SERIES-E39-FAG-FRONT-WHEEL-HUB-BEARING-KIT-FOR-ABS-31221093427-/251693026344?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&fits=Car+Make%3ABMW%7CPlat_Gen%3AE39&hash=item3a9a12cc28
     
    Hope this helps.
  24. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in brake judder still   
    A subject that is close to my heart and which I recently solved.

    Just had a look at the 'troubleshooting' section of the BMW TIS.

    Firstly, is the judder through the brake pedal only, steering wheel only, or both?

    TIS as follows on 'Pulsating effect on brake pedal':

    CAUSE
    1) Wheel-bearing play excessive
    2) Brake disc not aligned with fist caliper
    3) Brake disc runout
    4) Excessive thickness deviation within braking surface.

    REMEDY
    1) Replace wheel bearings
    2) Check floating caliper installation
    3) Replace brake discs
    4) Measure brake disc thickness. Grind or replace discs

    BMW TIS 'Troubleshooting on front axle':

    FAULT
    Vibration

    CAUSE
    1) Wheels imbalanced
    2) Rims have lateral/radial runout
    3)Tires have radial runout

    REMEDY
    1) Balance wheel
    2) Replace rims if necessary
    3) Match or replace tyres

    also:-

    FAULT
    Steering wheel shake

    CAUSE
    1) Wheels imbalanced
    2) Rims have lateral/radial runout
    3) Shock absorber effect insufficient
    4) Pressure rod bearing defective
    5) Excessive backlash on steering gear
    6) Traction strut bearing defective

    REMEDY
    1) Balance wheels
    2) Replace rims if necessary
    3) Replace shock absorber
    4) Replace traction strut mount
    5) Determine pressure point and replace steering gear
    6) Replace traction strut bearing.

    My own issues with brake vibration were solved by a simple but fairly long-winded brake bedding in procedure, but considered all of the above at one time or another.

    On a previous occasion I had odd noises/minor vibrations at certain speeds from tyres on the front axle (Bridgestone SO2, from memory) with about 3-4mm of tread left on them. New rubber up front made all that go away.

    (A buckled wheel - only slightly buckled - on my 530d also induced some vibration which also went away when changed to a rounder rim.)

    I notice from your posting that the front brakes were replaced fairly recently. Might be worth checking the installation of what BMW call the 'fist' caliper. Rear discs, as you say, could be another suspect as well?

    The two struts mentioned in the TIS will be the bent one (one of the usual suspects for vibration), and the straight one which normally gives fewer issues. Re. the bent arm: well worth changing the whole unit rather than just the rubber hydro bearing since there's a ball joint on the end of it that can wear; others have mentioned this above.

    How's your steering? Still precise and 'sharp'? Any little knocks over small potholes? Maybe also the source of some vibration through the steering wheel under braking? Outer tie rods worn? The centre tie rod normally gives fewer problems (allegedly!) but one of the ball joints on it can wear faster than the others, which was certainly the case on mine. Also, the single bush on the pitman arm (or is it the idler arm...I get confused...anyway, the one with a rubber/metal bush on it) may be giving problems too.

    There's a lot to consider, including wheel bearings.

    God, these cars can be frustrating...!
     
    (Edited to remove unexpected emoticons)
  25. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Been thinking about the M5 in Perth, any one seen it?   
    The '03 plate, is it the black one in Lothian on AT @ £7.2k?
     
    Remember, always buy on condition.
     
    If you're still in the market, why not look at both in one trip? Really important to see a few before you pull the trigger. 
     
    Price, age and mileage are not always the best indicators for potential purchasers: condition & provenance is everything when evaluating these cars. Also, good to see a few so you get a feel for the market before you commit.
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