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DepthHoar

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  1. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Bigdipper in Will this stop the brake judder?   
    The front (upper & lower) control arms on my 530d need changing at circa 60k miles. I'm on 138k miles now and about to fit the 3rd set, which will be Lemforder.

    I'm pretty sure this judder/shimmy issue works as follows.

    The bush on the 'bent' front control arm is sometimes referred to as the 'brake reaction bush' and when the bush is new it absorbs a lot of the energy/vibration generated under braking but without transmitting it into the body as judder. Thing is, if the brake discs/pads/wheel bearings are worn or distorted enough to produce excessive run-out, a worn or degraded brake reaction bush will be incapable of absorbing the energy/judder so it gets transmitted to the body instead. Changing the discs/pads/hubs will make the run-out/vibration disappear in the short term, only for it to return as the newly fitted parts start to wear and exhibit some run-out.

    Typical owner experience might go something like this:-

    (The E39 is, say, at 110k miles with new front control arms fitted at 65k miles, new brake discs & pads @ 90k miles).

    1. Owner experiences judder when braking at motorway speeds, especially when the brakes are hot and the car fully loaded.
    Excessive run-out from worn brakes overloads the capacity of the worn brake reaction bushes to absorb vibration = judder.

    2. Owner changes brake discs/pads and judder disappears or is reduced. Brake reaction bushes 'look fine on the car' when inspected by the owner & several mechanics.
    New brake discs exhibit less or nil run-out. Car runs and brakes smoothly without judder since the old/worn brake reaction bushes are unstressed.

    3. Judder returns a few hundred or 1000 miles later especially when brakes are hot etc..
    Brake discs starting to show run-out with just a little wear & heat, enough to overload the capacity of the old brake reaction bushes to damp the judder.

    4. Owner is convinced the new discs are warped & several mechanics agree 'the new discs must be warped' so owner fits another set of new ones.
    Judder returns again just a few hundred miles later & judder is slightly worse since the brake reaction bushes continue to age/wear and now have even lower tolerance to run-out produced by the discs.

    5. Owner finally replaces brake reaction bushes. Judder finally disappears.
    Car now has newish pads/discs = little run-out, which the new brake reaction bushes absorb with ease.

    Or,

    5. Owner finally replaces brake reaction bushes, but not the complete arm. Judder is a little better but still present.
    Newish pads/discs = little run-out which the new bushes cope with, but the ball joint on the other end of the arm is worn and is transmitting some energy as judder.

    6. Owner fits new arm (which comes fitted with new bush and ball joint). Judder disappears completely and 'permanently'.

    A few other things to add to the mix to make the diagnosis of shimmy/judder more difficult:

    * The are 10 ball joints in total on the front suspension & steering which can all wear. The E39 has a sophisticated multi-link suspension with relatively low wear tolerances before NVH becomes an issue.
    * There's another arm (the straight one) with a bush that can wear, though this tends to give less trouble than the brake reaction bush.
    * Wheel bearings/hubs can also wear and produce similar symptoms.
    * Issues of 'pad transfer' can affect the brake disc/pad interface and produce judder ("It's your discs, mate. They're warped", is the usual diagnosis on otherwise healthy pads/discs that just need properly bedding in, or re-bedding in. Discs will eventually warp when they are beyond their wear limits, cannot dissipate heat effectively and run-out becomes excessive). Occasionally, you will be supplied with a crap pair of new brake discs - probably from the cheaper end of the aftermarket.
    * Seized, or partially seized, brake calipers.
    * Worn struts and strut mounts, though this is probably a rarer cause of judder.
    * Poorly balanced wheels and/or buckled rims.
    * Refurbed alloy wheels with new paint or powder coating on the hub/wheel interface.
    * Wheels mounted to poorly cleaned up hubs.
    * Fitting cheap & rubbish aftermarket control arms, "Can't be the control arms creating the judder 'cos I put new YingTingLing ones on the car only 7k miles ago".
     
    A combination of all of the above on a 14 yr old vehicle makes for a major head-scratch when diagnosing judder/shimmy!
  2. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from BM Ian in DIY: easiest way to replace headlight adjusters?   
    If you've got fingers like bananas (it's a big club that one...founder member here) then you could try this. It worked for me:
     
    http://forum.bmw5.co.uk/topic/112063-headlights/?p=1208551
  3. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from stevecvo in Headlights   
    The adjuster is almost certainly broken on the passenger side.
     
    The broken bits may not have physically detached themselves or crumbled into pieces...yet....so there's no rattling at the moment. One of the easy tests for broken adjusters is to grab hold of the rubber covered bits at the back of the light and try to move them up and down: if they don't move the adjuster is OK, if it moves easily up and down then the adjuster is shot/broken.
     
    Sounds like the replacement one you bought is in a similar broken condition. Adjusters are available on eBay for very little money. The repair is definitely a DIY but is quite fiddly. You learn a lot doing one; the second one will take you about half as much time. Loads of DIY advice online/Youtube.
  4. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from dg666 in CPC or not to CPC?   
    Totally understand your desire to have your P&J dealt with by utterly expert hands. As others have indicated, probably most sensible advice is to find a good local BMW indy for regular servicing and save CPC for really major engine mechanical health checks (VANOS, timing chain guides & rod bearings). I definitely wouldn't be running 200 miles down to CPC for servicing such as a fluids and filters change.
     
    The remainder of the mechanical bits of the car are comparatively simple so much of the remaining work can be attended to by a good local garage with high technical competence. A clutch change for example is no big deal (something that some enthusiast owners with mechanical experience & nous have carried out on their own driveways); brakes and suspension work are also pretty straightforward though setting up the suspension on a 4 wheel alignment rig needs to be done carefully and you need to be picky here.
     
    There is a huge body of knowledge on the various forums that will allow you to do some easy research into problems you may run into when owning an E39 M5. Make full use of them (this forum and M5board in particular). The problem you think you have will almost certainly have been experienced by other owners on those forums + quite often the solution is provided too. You can then guide your indy or local garage in the right direction towards a final diagnosis - this will save you time and money.
     
    Also consider Redish Motorsport down in Bristol. They have an excellent reputation for fixing the very complicated oily bits of our engines (though they are often very busy).
  5. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from ally in ordering parts form germany bmw oem and lemforder, any websites please   
    I've been using Bestpartstore.co.uk for quite a lot of stuff recently. Most of it comes couriered from Germany. Excellent prices and free delivery on orders over £250 (otherwise £8.) Their prices for FAG wheel bearings are unbeatable.
  6. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Paddy O'Furniture in Polishing headlights   
    The kits mentioned above work pretty well but if your headlights are covered in deep gravel rash and you have the kit then doing a full on sanding restoration with a random orbit sander followed by compounding with rotary buffer gives the best results.
     
    I started with 500 grit followed by 1000 grit on the sander. From there it's probably best to go to 1200 grit wet sanding by hand, working your way through 1500 and finally 2000 grit. A rotary buffer with a fairly heavy cut compound (I used Farecla G3), finishing with something like Farecla G10, or Meguiars 205, will give you an 'as new' finish. Makes a huge difference and quite quick. You can achieve good results by hand but it takes a lot longer.
     
    Top tip: use masking tape to cover everything that needs protecting from accidental grit paper scratches (even more important if using power tools for sanding and compounding). The masking tape makes cleaning up the polishing compound residue a lot easier.
  7. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Spice-Boy in What problems/issues to look out for on a facelift 530d manual tourer   
    5 speed manual in the 530d
  8. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Shires in How to dissable rear brakes ?   
    Build small bonfire under rear axle and douse with petrol. Apply match.
     
    .....Rear brakes disabled and burnout achieved all at once & in no time at all.
     
     
    (Burnouts, like the one you're hoping to achieve, are like masturbation......best done in complete privacy so that no-one knows you're,..well,..er...a w**ker.)
     
    Look, sorry, no offence.. but really??
     
    I think you're on the wrong forum.
     
    ...Seriously.
  9. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Shires in How to dissable rear brakes ?   
    Build small bonfire under rear axle and douse with petrol. Apply match.
     
    .....Rear brakes disabled and burnout achieved all at once & in no time at all.
     
     
    (Burnouts, like the one you're hoping to achieve, are like masturbation......best done in complete privacy so that no-one knows you're,..well,..er...a w**ker.)
     
    Look, sorry, no offence.. but really??
     
    I think you're on the wrong forum.
     
    ...Seriously.
  10. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Shires in How to dissable rear brakes ?   
    Build small bonfire under rear axle and douse with petrol. Apply match.
     
    .....Rear brakes disabled and burnout achieved all at once & in no time at all.
     
     
    (Burnouts, like the one you're hoping to achieve, are like masturbation......best done in complete privacy so that no-one knows you're,..well,..er...a w**ker.)
     
    Look, sorry, no offence.. but really??
     
    I think you're on the wrong forum.
     
    ...Seriously.
  11. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in E39 centre drag link.. LHD and RHD the same?   
    LHD and RHD centre tie rods are different and have different part numbers.
     
    If you're struggling to find a RHD one in the UK try these people:
     
    http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/0126-steering/1117064-bmw-trw-center-drag-link-jcy105.html
     
    BUT...definitely ring them to check stock/availability. (£168 delivered at the moment.) They're a proper shop with real people, not just a call centre populated by know-nothing munchkins.
     
    (TRW are BMW OEM for the centre tie rod. The factory-fitted original that came off my M5 had BMW and TRW markings on it.)
     
    The correct TRW part number for the RHD centre tie rod is JCY105.
  12. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 centre drag link.. LHD and RHD the same?   
    Excellent price for the TRW part from Mister Auto - £104 delivered!
  13. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Shires in Rust proofing   
    I'm doing a lot of rust 'rectification' and painting at the moment on my pretty rusty 530d.
     
    I've done work on the front and rear arches and it's been quite a revealing and educational process.
     
    If your front and rear arches are clear of rust at the moment, and you just want to improve corrosion resistance of the front and rear arches, then I'd strongly recommend removing the wheel arch liners completely from the car and get in behind the folded metal of the arch itself with your Dinitrol/Bilthamber etc.. It can be a shocking corrosion trap IF your wheel arch liners are in imperfect fit. Any salty road crud that gets beyond the liner just sits in the folded open 'V' of the arch itself and slowly rots the metal. I reckon corrosion starts on the inside/out of wheel arches as much as from the outside/in. Some anti-stone chip paint on the exterior lips of the wheel arches is a good idea too, though that would mean primer, basecoat & clear coat to match.
     
    With  the wheel arch liners out you can fairly easily take the front wings off (takes about 30 mins per side) and give their inside surfaces a good going over with Dinitrol etc.. I was surprised at how much road crud the inside of the front wings had accumulated. I've had more rust rectification to do on the front wings and now wish I'd bought some rust-free second-hand ones off eBay and just painted them.
     
    With the front wings off you get access to both ends the inside cavity of the outer sills - you could spray a lot of rust preventative fluid/wax etc. down there to good effect.
     
    Probably the very best thing you could do would be to remove all the sill covers and inspect/treat your jacking points for corrosion.
  14. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Shires in Rust proofing   
    I'm doing a lot of rust 'rectification' and painting at the moment on my pretty rusty 530d.
     
    I've done work on the front and rear arches and it's been quite a revealing and educational process.
     
    If your front and rear arches are clear of rust at the moment, and you just want to improve corrosion resistance of the front and rear arches, then I'd strongly recommend removing the wheel arch liners completely from the car and get in behind the folded metal of the arch itself with your Dinitrol/Bilthamber etc.. It can be a shocking corrosion trap IF your wheel arch liners are in imperfect fit. Any salty road crud that gets beyond the liner just sits in the folded open 'V' of the arch itself and slowly rots the metal. I reckon corrosion starts on the inside/out of wheel arches as much as from the outside/in. Some anti-stone chip paint on the exterior lips of the wheel arches is a good idea too, though that would mean primer, basecoat & clear coat to match.
     
    With  the wheel arch liners out you can fairly easily take the front wings off (takes about 30 mins per side) and give their inside surfaces a good going over with Dinitrol etc.. I was surprised at how much road crud the inside of the front wings had accumulated. I've had more rust rectification to do on the front wings and now wish I'd bought some rust-free second-hand ones off eBay and just painted them.
     
    With the front wings off you get access to both ends the inside cavity of the outer sills - you could spray a lot of rust preventative fluid/wax etc. down there to good effect.
     
    Probably the very best thing you could do would be to remove all the sill covers and inspect/treat your jacking points for corrosion.
  15. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from V8Warrior in Engine mounts........   
    Try searching Amazon.co.uk for Febi 8782 & Febi 8783. Left and right E39 M5 engine mounts respectively. Limited stock at the moment but still available.
     
    Bought them last year for £32 each. A very reasonable £25 each now!
  16. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Liam79 in Removing saloon bootlid... easy?   
    Just replaced my terrible, rusted boot lid today with pretty mint one from an earlier car that I prepped then sprayed with rattle cans. The finish is 'acceptable' for the time being.....and wouldn't be noticed by a man passing by on a galloping horse...but I will be respraying it again along with the rest of the car when my compressor and spray gun arrives.
     
    A few issues cropped up and were solved that may save others a bit of head-scratching.
     
    The number plate lights were a bit of an arse to remove before I worked out the knack. Should go something like this:-
     

     
    Also discovered the cause of random Check Contol error messages I've been getting. If you are swapping out the boot lid it would certainly worth having a look at the section of the wiring harness that sits inside the rubber bellows tubing connecting the boot lid's electrics to the car's wiring loom.
     

     

     

     
    Repairing this section of the wiring loom would be much trickier if all the boot lid electrical harness connectors remained connected to the numberplate lights, lock mechanism and boot light etc. Having them disconnected and pulled through meant it was much easier to expose more of the loom and effect a proper repair.
  17. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from ally in What causes the E39 to rust?   
    To answer the OP's question: they do rust and quite badly sometimes. A lot is to do with the fact that they're old cars now and have succumbed to the sustained ravages of the British climate and road conditions. My 530d is a pretty good example of one that's been exposed to very harsh British conditions up here in the Scottish Highlands.....and showing it. Up here the roads are salted frequently from the beginning of November to the end of April. It takes a terrible toll on our vehicles.
     
    There are some relatively poor bits of design too on the E39 which doesn't help. Always felt that the jacking points could have been designed in a less rot-prone way. The fuel filler area is another rust trap, too. However, some cars seem to fare better than others. My 530d is a complete cosmetic rust heap but hasn't rusted much at all in some of the most common places. The fuel filler is bizarrely rust free & the jacking points & important bits of the sills behind the covers (which I've had off recently for an inspection) are really solid. Just sailed through an MOT without any advisories/comments on corrosion.
     
    The boot lid is a complete rust trap where water gets into the folded steel around the perimeter of the lid itself. The boot on mine is really awful so I bought a more or less rust-free boot lid that came off a 1998 model which was, for all intents and purposes, unblemished. I'm painting it at the moment and will be putting on the diesel soon.
     
    The car does look bad at the moment though! Have a look.......
     
    ........I hang my head in shame....!
     
    (My M5 is a different story entirely and is minter than a mint-thing. Visible behind the diesel.)





  18. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in pic request. Top mounts   
    Just checked a few things. 
     
    The BMW part number for the actual 'guide support' (the top mount itself) is 31331091708.
     
    The BMW part number for the 'repair kit' (as shown in my original photo) is 31352298912. Includes 5 nuts, the mount & the dished washer (wasn't sure but found out it is actually included in the kit).
     
    Had a look at the ZF webcat and they come up with the following after-market part numbers for the front mount (Boge, Sachs & Lemforder are all ZF brands):
     
    Lemforder:-  
    21808-01, (or 21808 - an older number)
     
    Sachs:-
    802056
     
    Boge:-
    2-22-000453-01;
    2-22-000453-01-H;
    87372H
     
    Probably worth pulling back the CP4L label and having a peek at the Lemforder number but I have to say the one in your photo looks nothing like the BMW original. Your photo reminds me of the front mount that went on to my 530d when I had the front suspension refreshed. I reckon they've sent you Lemforder 27001-01.
     
    I've had no end of problems with CP4L & ECP (the same company) sending me seemingly random parts. It's a pain returning them mainly because their returns system is so slow and clunky. I try to buy elsewhere now, often direct from Germany where prices are often much better. If the Euro goes into free-fall because of what's happening (or not happening...) in Greece, then the stuff direct from Germany should be even cheaper.
  19. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from ger in E39 M5 Fuel Pump   
    The OE fuel pump insert is made by Pierburg, part no. 7.22013.61.0 and is available for £122 from Bestpartstore.co.uk here:
     
    http://www.bestpartstore.co.uk/965240
     
    I bought mine on Amazon but the one above is cheaper than the deal I got.
  20. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in E39 M5 Fuel Pump   
    Just completed the fuel pump swap. Check out this video (really high quality vid but he rips through it at quite a speed though gives a good idea of what's what but bear in mind he's bought the pump & plastic cage assembly not just the pump insert):
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apOHpW_K_Lk
     
    Some observations to help others:
     
    1. Do the job with the fuel level reading really low (ie. just when the fuel light comes on or thereabouts. Means you don't have to siphon fuel out of the fuel tank.)
     
    2. If you're just changing the pump insert rather than the whole fuel pump assembly (inc. plastic cage etc as bought from BMW dealers), then you'll need a Jubilee clip a little smaller than 12mm. The factory original that came off was a stainless steel stepless ear clip with '11.3' stamped on it. Realoem indicate a clip with a 12-15mm capacity - that would be way too big.
     
    3. De-pressurise the fuel system by pulling the fuel pump relay then start the car and let the engine run out of fuel (takes a few seconds). Repeat. I had nil fuel come out of the pipework under pressure after I did this. Make sure you then isolate the battery before disassembly/removal of anything to do with the fuel pump assembly.
     
    4. The pump and fuel level indicator come out easily enough and both reassemble fairly simply. Just be logical when putting them back in. The fuel float arm kind of gets in the way a bit and needs carefully threading to get it in place. (When the fuel pump assembly and fuel level float assembly are out of the car, check to see how the float assembly locates into the fuel pump assembly with a plastic stalk thing. Quite logical.)
     
    5. Getting the old pump insert out of the plastic cage thing was a minor head-scratch (there's a special tool for this apparently) but is achievable with a few small flat blade screwdrivers wedged in here and there. It's obvious what to do when you've got the fuel pump assembly in front of you. Also, carefully remove the plastic filter at the base of the pump before you start pulling the pump out of the cage assembly as it makes holding the whole thing easier.
     
    6. The big nitrile rubber seal (the one before you put the whole thing to bed). Can be a bit of an arse making it seal everything properly. I found it easiest to do the following:
     
    a)  Put the nitrile seal in place on the underside of the circular plastic 'lid'. The seal tells you which side is up/down. Next, insert the fuel pump assembly into the tank making sure it clicks into place. There's only one way for it to go in.
    c)  Then insert/thread the fuel level sender through the hole correctly locating the float (+ plastic stalk-thing that sits in a recess next to the fuel pump).
    d)  Drop the nitrile rubber seal down off the circular plastic 'lid' and carefully locate/fit to the aperture. Be sure it's snug and positive fit.
    e)  Use a very thin (really thin!) smear of Vaseline on the under lip of the plastic lid. This little bit of lube makes it snug down into position easily, just make sure it's positioned correctly (there's a tab to locate). Then lock the whole thing down with the metal lock ring.
     
    Hope this helps!
     
     
  21. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in Wheel alignment at BMW dealer   
    The Hunter system is well regarded and in practical terms as good as the BMW KDS.
     
    As with everything involving technology a lot depends on the skill/knowledge of the technicians operating the equipment.
     
    An expertly operated Hunter system will be better than an inexperienced BMW apprentice wrestling with a KDS machine.... and vice versa.
     
    The BMW dealer 'should' add weights to the car to the correct BMW specification. Your local Hunter outfit may do this but a lot of alignment places don't. Could be a clincher?
     
    BMW additional weights spec as follows:
    68kg on each front seat, 68kg in centre of rear bench seat, 21kg in centre of the boot space. Car should be presented for alignment with a full tank of fuel.
     
    Whichever you choose make sure they provide you with a 'before and after' print out: both machines are capable of producing a paper copy.
     
    (Edit for typo)
  22. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in Suspension refresh - what should I change?   
    There are quite a few posts on this subject so have a look for additional advice.
     
    A lot depends on what condition your car is in and how much you're prepared to spend to get the steering and suspension absolutely right.
     
    I'd concentrate on the front first and change the following on the diagram below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=31_0264
     
    The wobble you're experiencing is probably because bush #6 is shot....but I'd change the whole arm #5 since the ball joint on the end is probably past its best too. So replace #5, #7, #9, #10 & #11 (#5 comes with the bush pre-installed. Lemforder is the brand to go for - OE suppliers of the same part to BMW). The wobble/judder you're experiencing is often mistaken for warped brake rotors or sticking caliper.....which can happen.....but bush #6 is usually the culprit.
     
    (Since 'you're already in there' I'd also replace #12 + all the associated nuts/bolts/washers. #12 gives less problems than #5 but is probably worth doing at the same time.)
     
    Drop links are almost a consumable item and if they haven't been replaced they'd be on my 'to do' list as well. #6 below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=31_0257
     
    Other common issues (eg. odd light knocking after 30 mins from cold) on the front axle often seem to come from the steering gear centre & outer tie rods so I'd replace #6, #9, #10, #11 below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=32_0731
     
    Then get a proper 4 wheel alignment adjustment done by people who are experienced, know how to use the alignment kit and understand the E39 M5 suspension.
     
    So far, so good but haven't touched the dampers or top mounts yet...but that's another ball game.
     
    That's quite a list isn't it! If I were to do just one of the above then it would be replacing arm #5 + a proper wheel alignment.
     
    Later on (once you've recovered from the financial pain of sorting the front axle) you can start on the rear!
  23. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in E39 M5 Prices likely to peak?   
    I think prices for our cars have been buoyant for the past year or two. There's definitely a seasonal peak, too (spring & summer) but my feeling is that prices will ease a bit in future.
     
    This trend has already started across most other marques in the 'modern classic' market with two notable exceptions: Ferrari & top spec air-cooled Porsches. If interest rates rise then quite a lot of money will be put into cash investments instead of previously appreciating classic cars; this will take a lot of demand out of the classic car market and prices should fall.
     
    This is all crystal ball gazing of course! In the real world anything could happen. If Greece pulls the plug on the Euro and Britain decides to leave the EU then who knows what could happen...to say nothing of how China's economy or Putin's plans for world domination pan out.
     
    My advice: if you like the car keep it & drive it.
  24. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from timk in DIY: Big Ends and Chain Guides   
    If such a thing were possible, a printed & encapsulated copy of this post /\ /\ should be in the service book of every E39 M5.
     
    It's so refreshing to read something like this compared to the doom & gloom on the M5board. Often the stuff there is motivated by owners' wish to spend a shed-load of money on their cars irrespective or not whether it needs doing. I'm not decrying preventative maintenance (since I'm a proponent of it) but I find our American cousins take it to extremes, almost as a sort of religious experience ('My car is a temple' and I will make regular and expensive mechanical sacrifices to please the M5 gods..).
     
    Of course there will be cars that really need a lot of invasive and expensive spannering but, as Jamie points out, the sizeable majority probably don't.
     
    If you have the skill and knowledge (which Jamie has in spades) then committing to, and doing this sort of work yourself, makes sense. I'm pretty sure he enjoyed doing it, too!
  25. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from timk in DIY: Big Ends and Chain Guides   
    If such a thing were possible, a printed & encapsulated copy of this post /\ /\ should be in the service book of every E39 M5.
     
    It's so refreshing to read something like this compared to the doom & gloom on the M5board. Often the stuff there is motivated by owners' wish to spend a shed-load of money on their cars irrespective or not whether it needs doing. I'm not decrying preventative maintenance (since I'm a proponent of it) but I find our American cousins take it to extremes, almost as a sort of religious experience ('My car is a temple' and I will make regular and expensive mechanical sacrifices to please the M5 gods..).
     
    Of course there will be cars that really need a lot of invasive and expensive spannering but, as Jamie points out, the sizeable majority probably don't.
     
    If you have the skill and knowledge (which Jamie has in spades) then committing to, and doing this sort of work yourself, makes sense. I'm pretty sure he enjoyed doing it, too!
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