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DepthHoar

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  1. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in E39 M5 Fuel Pump   
    Just completed the fuel pump swap. Check out this video (really high quality vid but he rips through it at quite a speed though gives a good idea of what's what but bear in mind he's bought the pump & plastic cage assembly not just the pump insert):
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apOHpW_K_Lk
     
    Some observations to help others:
     
    1. Do the job with the fuel level reading really low (ie. just when the fuel light comes on or thereabouts. Means you don't have to siphon fuel out of the fuel tank.)
     
    2. If you're just changing the pump insert rather than the whole fuel pump assembly (inc. plastic cage etc as bought from BMW dealers), then you'll need a Jubilee clip a little smaller than 12mm. The factory original that came off was a stainless steel stepless ear clip with '11.3' stamped on it. Realoem indicate a clip with a 12-15mm capacity - that would be way too big.
     
    3. De-pressurise the fuel system by pulling the fuel pump relay then start the car and let the engine run out of fuel (takes a few seconds). Repeat. I had nil fuel come out of the pipework under pressure after I did this. Make sure you then isolate the battery before disassembly/removal of anything to do with the fuel pump assembly.
     
    4. The pump and fuel level indicator come out easily enough and both reassemble fairly simply. Just be logical when putting them back in. The fuel float arm kind of gets in the way a bit and needs carefully threading to get it in place. (When the fuel pump assembly and fuel level float assembly are out of the car, check to see how the float assembly locates into the fuel pump assembly with a plastic stalk thing. Quite logical.)
     
    5. Getting the old pump insert out of the plastic cage thing was a minor head-scratch (there's a special tool for this apparently) but is achievable with a few small flat blade screwdrivers wedged in here and there. It's obvious what to do when you've got the fuel pump assembly in front of you. Also, carefully remove the plastic filter at the base of the pump before you start pulling the pump out of the cage assembly as it makes holding the whole thing easier.
     
    6. The big nitrile rubber seal (the one before you put the whole thing to bed). Can be a bit of an arse making it seal everything properly. I found it easiest to do the following:
     
    a)  Put the nitrile seal in place on the underside of the circular plastic 'lid'. The seal tells you which side is up/down. Next, insert the fuel pump assembly into the tank making sure it clicks into place. There's only one way for it to go in.
    c)  Then insert/thread the fuel level sender through the hole correctly locating the float (+ plastic stalk-thing that sits in a recess next to the fuel pump).
    d)  Drop the nitrile rubber seal down off the circular plastic 'lid' and carefully locate/fit to the aperture. Be sure it's snug and positive fit.
    e)  Use a very thin (really thin!) smear of Vaseline on the under lip of the plastic lid. This little bit of lube makes it snug down into position easily, just make sure it's positioned correctly (there's a tab to locate). Then lock the whole thing down with the metal lock ring.
     
    Hope this helps!
     
     
  2. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in Wheel alignment at BMW dealer   
    The Hunter system is well regarded and in practical terms as good as the BMW KDS.
     
    As with everything involving technology a lot depends on the skill/knowledge of the technicians operating the equipment.
     
    An expertly operated Hunter system will be better than an inexperienced BMW apprentice wrestling with a KDS machine.... and vice versa.
     
    The BMW dealer 'should' add weights to the car to the correct BMW specification. Your local Hunter outfit may do this but a lot of alignment places don't. Could be a clincher?
     
    BMW additional weights spec as follows:
    68kg on each front seat, 68kg in centre of rear bench seat, 21kg in centre of the boot space. Car should be presented for alignment with a full tank of fuel.
     
    Whichever you choose make sure they provide you with a 'before and after' print out: both machines are capable of producing a paper copy.
     
    (Edit for typo)
  3. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in Suspension refresh - what should I change?   
    There are quite a few posts on this subject so have a look for additional advice.
     
    A lot depends on what condition your car is in and how much you're prepared to spend to get the steering and suspension absolutely right.
     
    I'd concentrate on the front first and change the following on the diagram below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=31_0264
     
    The wobble you're experiencing is probably because bush #6 is shot....but I'd change the whole arm #5 since the ball joint on the end is probably past its best too. So replace #5, #7, #9, #10 & #11 (#5 comes with the bush pre-installed. Lemforder is the brand to go for - OE suppliers of the same part to BMW). The wobble/judder you're experiencing is often mistaken for warped brake rotors or sticking caliper.....which can happen.....but bush #6 is usually the culprit.
     
    (Since 'you're already in there' I'd also replace #12 + all the associated nuts/bolts/washers. #12 gives less problems than #5 but is probably worth doing at the same time.)
     
    Drop links are almost a consumable item and if they haven't been replaced they'd be on my 'to do' list as well. #6 below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=31_0257
     
    Other common issues (eg. odd light knocking after 30 mins from cold) on the front axle often seem to come from the steering gear centre & outer tie rods so I'd replace #6, #9, #10, #11 below:
     
    http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR---E39-BMW-M5&diagId=32_0731
     
    Then get a proper 4 wheel alignment adjustment done by people who are experienced, know how to use the alignment kit and understand the E39 M5 suspension.
     
    So far, so good but haven't touched the dampers or top mounts yet...but that's another ball game.
     
    That's quite a list isn't it! If I were to do just one of the above then it would be replacing arm #5 + a proper wheel alignment.
     
    Later on (once you've recovered from the financial pain of sorting the front axle) you can start on the rear!
  4. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in E39 M5 Prices likely to peak?   
    I think prices for our cars have been buoyant for the past year or two. There's definitely a seasonal peak, too (spring & summer) but my feeling is that prices will ease a bit in future.
     
    This trend has already started across most other marques in the 'modern classic' market with two notable exceptions: Ferrari & top spec air-cooled Porsches. If interest rates rise then quite a lot of money will be put into cash investments instead of previously appreciating classic cars; this will take a lot of demand out of the classic car market and prices should fall.
     
    This is all crystal ball gazing of course! In the real world anything could happen. If Greece pulls the plug on the Euro and Britain decides to leave the EU then who knows what could happen...to say nothing of how China's economy or Putin's plans for world domination pan out.
     
    My advice: if you like the car keep it & drive it.
  5. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from timk in DIY: Big Ends and Chain Guides   
    If such a thing were possible, a printed & encapsulated copy of this post /\ /\ should be in the service book of every E39 M5.
     
    It's so refreshing to read something like this compared to the doom & gloom on the M5board. Often the stuff there is motivated by owners' wish to spend a shed-load of money on their cars irrespective or not whether it needs doing. I'm not decrying preventative maintenance (since I'm a proponent of it) but I find our American cousins take it to extremes, almost as a sort of religious experience ('My car is a temple' and I will make regular and expensive mechanical sacrifices to please the M5 gods..).
     
    Of course there will be cars that really need a lot of invasive and expensive spannering but, as Jamie points out, the sizeable majority probably don't.
     
    If you have the skill and knowledge (which Jamie has in spades) then committing to, and doing this sort of work yourself, makes sense. I'm pretty sure he enjoyed doing it, too!
  6. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from timk in DIY: Big Ends and Chain Guides   
    If such a thing were possible, a printed & encapsulated copy of this post /\ /\ should be in the service book of every E39 M5.
     
    It's so refreshing to read something like this compared to the doom & gloom on the M5board. Often the stuff there is motivated by owners' wish to spend a shed-load of money on their cars irrespective or not whether it needs doing. I'm not decrying preventative maintenance (since I'm a proponent of it) but I find our American cousins take it to extremes, almost as a sort of religious experience ('My car is a temple' and I will make regular and expensive mechanical sacrifices to please the M5 gods..).
     
    Of course there will be cars that really need a lot of invasive and expensive spannering but, as Jamie points out, the sizeable majority probably don't.
     
    If you have the skill and knowledge (which Jamie has in spades) then committing to, and doing this sort of work yourself, makes sense. I'm pretty sure he enjoyed doing it, too!
  7. Like
    DepthHoar reacted to jamiepeers in DIY: Big Ends and Chain Guides   
    Thanks for the kind comments guys.
     
    DirtyHarry/Tim, you've both touched on something there, and although i'm still glad i did the job, it does IMO reiterate the point that in the vast majority of cases these engines are really tough and have so much longevity.
     
    I have always said, and will continue to say, that people do not come on to car forums to say how wonderful their car is running, and thats why forums are a double edged sword. On one hand they empower owners, give them knowledge and inform them, but on the other they are a breeding ground for "sky is falling" moments over every single repeat issue these cars can have.
     
    As much as you are likely to see posts such as Firestorm with a blown engine there are many more "unposted" stories of folk with plenty of reliable miles under their belts.
     
    I have never shied away from this. This thread has not suddenly changed my opinion. When i performed my vanos overhaul, i said the same thing, and will continue to do so.
     
    The sad fact is a lot of people simply want to justify massive spend, and so sometimes you'll get tales of how worn the bits were on removal, or how quiet it is after the job. Not just a job like this, all sorts of jobs. I don't operate like that.
     
    I couldn't tell you if the car's quieter, because it hasn't been started yet! But, i don't expect it to be any different.
     
    I sincerely hope that this thread helps many people, aside from that it was fun to document it anyways, but even if that help is indirect whereby people say "sod it i think i'll leave it now" then at least it has helped someone make an informed decision, and maybe save a few £££ they were going to spend out of nothing more than fear. Thats good enough for me too.
     
    Sure there will be people who want to tackle this regardless and thats the main reason for the thread, to help, i hope its of some use.
     
    I cannot say for definate whether or not you should tackle this job at x y z mileage, thats your call. All i can do is provide the information applicable to my car. Thats 142K worth of wear there. Others have had issues before that.
     
    Peace of mind is a wonderful thing if you can afford it, but this thread shows if you can't its not necessarily a bad thing, and that vigilance for noise will run you a very close second here.
     
    I'll  let you decide what you want to do
  8. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from FIBAMAN in how to get 530d with a decat through an mot   
    I have the Ecotune decat, too and have been into this MOT issue in some detail.
     
    First some background on catalytic converters and diesel cars. For Euro Emissions Type Approval 3, 4 & 5, car manufacturers had to meet certain emissions criteria but it was left up to them how they achieved that. This is a reply to letter sent to VOSA by someone on another forum a year or two ago:
     
    "Thank you for your e-mail reply dated 19th December 2011, concerning new MOT test rules. 
    The fitment of a catalytic converter to petrol engine vehicles is mandatory for vehicles of the specified age and type e.g. passenger car, goods etc. The MOT Inspection Manual can therefore specify exactly what petrol engine vehicles must have a catalyst fitted. 
    However, whilst diesel engine vehicles are required to meet certain emissions limits for Type Approval, the method used to achieve this is not specified. It was left to the engine manufacturer to decide how to meet Euro 3, 4, 5 etc emissions standards. 
    For this reason, testers would be unable to readily determine which vehicles are OE fitted with a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) or Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system.  (My emphasis)
    It was therefore considered that the introduction of a Reason for Rejection for a missing diesel catalyst at this stage, whilst complying with the Directive, was likely to lead to many incorrect failures, which is clearly unacceptable. 
    The matter is under review and may therefore change in the future."
     
    I went on a 'fishing trip' for more up to date information from VOSA and contacted them in February. Email as follows:
      I bought my diesel car secondhand some years ago and would like to know if a catalytic converter and diesel particulate filter were fitted as standard when the car was new. The car in question is a BMW E39 530d, registration number XXXXX. It was registered new on 1st July 2000. VIN number is XXXXXXXXXXXX. The reason I ask is because the MOT regulations have been changed recently regarding the presence of catalysts and DPFs on diesel cars and I have no idea whether my car had these two devices fitted from new, or whether they were removed by a previous owner. For reference, my car has passed previous MOTs without emissions problems. Is there any database you have access to that has the information I seek?   Their reply:   Thank you for your email enquiry dated 6th February 2015, concerning the above. 
    Unfortunately, we wouldn't be able to advise whether each of these items were fitted to your vehicle as standards.  This is something that you would need to query with the vehicle manufacturer.  During the MOT test, the tester is required to use their own knowledge and experience to determine whether these items are fitted as standard. 
    I hope this information has assisted you with your enquiry, but if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to contact us again. 

    Kind Regards, 
    Rebecca
    Customer Service Centre Agent 
    Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency | The Ellipse, Padley Road, Swansea, SA1 8AN
    Phone: 0300 123 9000    Conclusions from all this info about diesel cars covered by Euro 3, 4 & 5 regs:   1. How engine manufacturers met the Euro 3, 4 & 5 emissions standards was up to them. This may have meant they fitted cats (& DPFs), or, made internal changes to engines to produce less emissions (rather than clean them up post-combustion). Cats were not mandatory for diesel cars.   2. Apart from contacting the vehicle manufacturer (not realistic in the real world?) the MOT tester has no way of knowing whether a catalytic converter was fitted as standard to your diesel car. There is no VOSA database he has access to in the MOT testing station, or online, the tester can interrogate to find out this information about your particular car.   3. The MOT tester has to use his own "knowledge and experience" to determine whether or not your diesel car was fitted with a catalytic converter as standard. In other words, he has to use his discretion.    My suggestion would be to find a sympathetic MOT tester who you can have a discussion with about cats and the uncertainty and vagueness of the new MOT regs. No doubt there will be plenty of MOT tester 'jobs-worths' out there who will just fail stuff without cats because 'he sees loads of these particular cars and they all have cats'. Plus, make sure all shield/covers are in place that mask the pre-cats on E39 diesels. Lastly, you can always appeal an MOT failure if your car fails for not having a cat and beat the MOT tester over the head with all the above info. (I would be very interested to learn the outcome of any such appeal).
  9. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jones73 in Reconditioned Sachs shocks.   
    Konis would be a good choice. I considered them but then decided I want to keep the car 'bone stock'. Actually, I also quite like the handling/ride compromise of the OE set up.
     
    Let me know if you find anyone who can do a proper refurb the old Sachs units - I'm sure there'd be a ready market for rebuilt dampers.
  10. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from e60530i in Reconditioned Sachs shocks.   
    The 'beat on the street' over on M5board on this issue seems to be that springs get changed every other damper change. How true that is in reality I don't know, but I'm going to give it a go.
  11. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Valve Cover Gaskets - Ebay?   
    Recently bought a Behr thermostat & Elring thermostat seal.
     
    As far as I could find out Elring are OE suppliers to BMW.
     
    That eBay price is a very good one.....as long as it actually is Elring that is supplied.
  12. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from rob-the-viking in Best manufacturer for front wheel hub/bearing housing   
    Try FAG. They're a OE supplier to BMW and make a high quality product. Here:
     
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BMW-5-SERIES-E39-FAG-FRONT-WHEEL-HUB-BEARING-KIT-FOR-ABS-31221093427-/251693026344?pt=UK_CarsParts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&fits=Car+Make%3ABMW%7CPlat_Gen%3AE39&hash=item3a9a12cc28
     
    Hope this helps.
  13. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    Grease should go on the adjustment thread at either end of the centre tie rod before the outer tie rods are threaded on - coat the thread completely. BMW TIS says 'special grease'...whatever that is..
     
    TIS specifically recommends no grease used on any other component or mating surface when replacing centre / outer tie rods / idler arm / pitman arm.
     
    (Just as an aside. Realoem.com has mistakenly reversed the labelling of the idler and Pitman arm. Official BMW TIS has them labelled the other way round.)
     
     
    Torque values: (Use new nuts in each case)
     
    Either end of idler arm - 62nm (bush end) & 65nm;
     
    Pitman arm - 61nm (clamp bolt but at steering gear end) & 65nm
     
    Tie rod end clamping nuts - 51nm
     
    Tie rod end to steering knuckle - 65nm
     
    Hope this helps!
  14. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    To dispel doubt, these are the centre and outer tie rods that came off my M5 last year and were BMW OE, as fitted at the factory...aka TRW:-


  15. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    £104 for the TRW centre tie rod sounds great. 
     
    Outer tie rods - TRW or Lemforder? Either of those two - have a slight preference for Lemforder but I'm maybe splitting hairs? Whichever is cheaper?
  16. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    I've used these people for TRW stuff in the past and found them good. Here's the TRW centre tie rod:
     
    http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/0126-steering/1117064-bmw-trw-center-drag-link-jcy105.html
     
    ...which is £70 more than the Febi one on the Allgermanparts website. TRW are the OE suppliers of centre tie rods for the E39 M5 but there's quite a price differential.....£168 TRW vs £75 Febi. Either will be cheaper than one from Cotswold BMW (circa £200 delivered and it will be a TRW part they'll be sending to you).
     
    I'd go with the TRW centre tie rod myself from Incarmotorfactors, but then I like to keep things that are not service or consumable items as OE as possible. Your priorities may be different.
     
    Outer tie rods for me would be Lemforder or TRW, in that order, but again it's a personal choice.
  17. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in E39 M5 Centre Tie Rod & Steering Linkages   
    I've used these people for TRW stuff in the past and found them good. Here's the TRW centre tie rod:
     
    http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/0126-steering/1117064-bmw-trw-center-drag-link-jcy105.html
     
    ...which is £70 more than the Febi one on the Allgermanparts website. TRW are the OE suppliers of centre tie rods for the E39 M5 but there's quite a price differential.....£168 TRW vs £75 Febi. Either will be cheaper than one from Cotswold BMW (circa £200 delivered and it will be a TRW part they'll be sending to you).
     
    I'd go with the TRW centre tie rod myself from Incarmotorfactors, but then I like to keep things that are not service or consumable items as OE as possible. Your priorities may be different.
     
    Outer tie rods for me would be Lemforder or TRW, in that order, but again it's a personal choice.
  18. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in Is 7 owners too many?   
    Would be interesting to see if the vehicle came with receipts/invoices to support the stamps in the service book.
     
    "Servicing", fundamentally, is the changing of fluids and filters (possibly not even had plugs changed at that mileage) + some visual inspection. Do main dealers do this "better" than an BMW indi or clued-up general garage? It's not rocket science. The dealer will have used the correct (and over-priced) service items, but other garages are perfectly capable of using the right (cheaper) stuff if you have chosen your spannerman carefully.
     
    The main dealer should be able to carry out the inspection side of servicing since they claim to have insight and knowledge of all BMW models. However, the reality can sometimes be quite different. Of course BMW dealers can do a good job, but there is a sizeable minority of M5 owners out there who have found that not to be the case.
     
    If you intend to keep the car and it's got loads of proper receipts to back up the service book stamps then it may not matter if the stamps come with the official BMW logo. (Resale may be more difficult later since buyers, rightly or wrongly, like to see FBMWSH.)
     
    One of the most critical services is the very first one: really important that this wasn't missed.
     
    The most important thing I'd want to see is evidence of maintenance, in particular the changing of critical suspension & steering components, numerous sensors and maybe parts of the running gear, clutch etc. etc. (Be good to see some work had been done on the brakes but they're service items, really, albeit expensive ones.)
     
    Maintenance contributes significantly to condition. And condition is everything with these cars. Buy on condition.
  19. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Rich_D in Is 7 owners too many?   
    Would be interesting to see if the vehicle came with receipts/invoices to support the stamps in the service book.
     
    "Servicing", fundamentally, is the changing of fluids and filters (possibly not even had plugs changed at that mileage) + some visual inspection. Do main dealers do this "better" than an BMW indi or clued-up general garage? It's not rocket science. The dealer will have used the correct (and over-priced) service items, but other garages are perfectly capable of using the right (cheaper) stuff if you have chosen your spannerman carefully.
     
    The main dealer should be able to carry out the inspection side of servicing since they claim to have insight and knowledge of all BMW models. However, the reality can sometimes be quite different. Of course BMW dealers can do a good job, but there is a sizeable minority of M5 owners out there who have found that not to be the case.
     
    If you intend to keep the car and it's got loads of proper receipts to back up the service book stamps then it may not matter if the stamps come with the official BMW logo. (Resale may be more difficult later since buyers, rightly or wrongly, like to see FBMWSH.)
     
    One of the most critical services is the very first one: really important that this wasn't missed.
     
    The most important thing I'd want to see is evidence of maintenance, in particular the changing of critical suspension & steering components, numerous sensors and maybe parts of the running gear, clutch etc. etc. (Be good to see some work had been done on the brakes but they're service items, really, albeit expensive ones.)
     
    Maintenance contributes significantly to condition. And condition is everything with these cars. Buy on condition.
  20. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Mondial Extended Warranty   
    What the guy at Mondial really means: "I've reduced the premium to you, sir, because I'm on a commission-only salary, I've not sold anything this week and I'm desperate to sell this policy."
     
     
    Look at the whole proposition this way over, say, 3 years:
     
    Option 1.
    Spend £1600 on a warranty per year
    Spend £1000 on maintenance/servicing per year.
    Total over 3 years: £7800
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Possibly/possibly not
     
    Option 2.
    No warranty
    Spend £2500 a year on preventative maintenance/intensive servicing.
    Total over 3 years: £7500
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Probably.
     
    Overall: £300 ahead of the game + a more reliable car (probably) + one that has maintained its performance and handling edge.
     
    What about the risk of catastrophic vanos/engine/gearbox failure?
     
    Firstly, the engine & drivetrain is robust and good for 200k miles if cared for, and total failure rare in these examples. Yes, there might be rod bearing issues, VANOS and timing chain guides to contend with later in the car's life but warranty companies are likely to call 'wear & tear' on those. Clutch & flywheel? Dampers?...(it's a long list)...the warranty company will almost certainly close the door on you. Remember, there's also a £250 excess every time you make a claim, too.
     
    Also, if your're the sort of person willing to commit to £6000 of maintenance over 3yrs then you're definitely a fussy, enthusiastic owner who takes proper care of their car. The chances of catastrophic failure will be less, a lot less probably, than a Drift-King who runs the car on a shoestring and rags the arse off it at every opportunity hastening poor functionality and early demise of the vehicle. 
     
    This maintenance-instead-of-warranty approach won't suit everybody. A lot will depend on your approach to risk and how deep your pockets are. There'll be some careful risk-averse owners who will choose a warranty as well as spending big on maintenance. If money's not an issue then why not? 
  21. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Mondial Extended Warranty   
    What the guy at Mondial really means: "I've reduced the premium to you, sir, because I'm on a commission-only salary, I've not sold anything this week and I'm desperate to sell this policy."
     
     
    Look at the whole proposition this way over, say, 3 years:
     
    Option 1.
    Spend £1600 on a warranty per year
    Spend £1000 on maintenance/servicing per year.
    Total over 3 years: £7800
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Possibly/possibly not
     
    Option 2.
    No warranty
    Spend £2500 a year on preventative maintenance/intensive servicing.
    Total over 3 years: £7500
    Conclusion: Is the car more reliable and running optimally? - Probably.
     
    Overall: £300 ahead of the game + a more reliable car (probably) + one that has maintained its performance and handling edge.
     
    What about the risk of catastrophic vanos/engine/gearbox failure?
     
    Firstly, the engine & drivetrain is robust and good for 200k miles if cared for, and total failure rare in these examples. Yes, there might be rod bearing issues, VANOS and timing chain guides to contend with later in the car's life but warranty companies are likely to call 'wear & tear' on those. Clutch & flywheel? Dampers?...(it's a long list)...the warranty company will almost certainly close the door on you. Remember, there's also a £250 excess every time you make a claim, too.
     
    Also, if your're the sort of person willing to commit to £6000 of maintenance over 3yrs then you're definitely a fussy, enthusiastic owner who takes proper care of their car. The chances of catastrophic failure will be less, a lot less probably, than a Drift-King who runs the car on a shoestring and rags the arse off it at every opportunity hastening poor functionality and early demise of the vehicle. 
     
    This maintenance-instead-of-warranty approach won't suit everybody. A lot will depend on your approach to risk and how deep your pockets are. There'll be some careful risk-averse owners who will choose a warranty as well as spending big on maintenance. If money's not an issue then why not? 
  22. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in Diff oil from the Dealer.   
    LSD oil:
    I agree, it can all be a bit confusing. If the diff on your E39 M5 is functioning normally and not noisy then just go with the Castrol Syntrax Limited Slip 75W-140: it's cheaper and it's officially approved by BMW. If your limited slip diff is noisy then some on the M5board suggest adding a little additional 'friction modifier', which is available in very small bottles from Opie Oils. The friction modifier increases lubricity and will marginally degrade the function of the limited slip differential, depending on how much you put in.....but make the diff quieter.
     
    Have a look at this M5board thread on diff oil, it should give a little more clarity:
    http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/136567-bmw-synthetic-diff-fluid.html
     
    I definitely wouldn't be paying silly money for the BMW OE LSD oil, 'FM Booster' or no.
     
    My advice would be: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just use the Castrol stuff as outlined above.
    (Re-reading the BMW TIS I notice it recommends that the contents of whichever diff oil bottle should be thoroughly mixed/shaken before use.)
     
    Gear box oil:
    I tried chasing down the manufacture of the stuff that goes in the E39 M5 gearbox to see if they sell it on the after-market at a lower price. I think it's made by Exxon-Mobil (Esso) but was left grasping at straws and can't be sure.
     
    So, you're stuck with buying it from BMW or chancing your arm with Royal Purple/Red Line/etc as used by quite a few on the M5board. There are multiple very long threads, with a whole variety of different opinions and conclusions about respective benefits/disadvantages of using the different oils. Reading them will do your head in: it did for mine!
     
    The lowest risk option is to go with the BMW OE stuff labelled MTF-LT-2 (according to BMW TIS this supercedes MTF-LT-1) and can be used in all E39 M5 gearboxes. The downside is the cost. Only available in 5 litre containers if bought mail-order for......£103.97, which is what I paid last year for it via Cotswold, and you'll have about half of it left over after the oil change. Some have had luck in the past going to a dealer in person and buying the exact amount from the parts department (bring-an-empty-bottle sort of thing).
     
    I just didn't want to take a chance as I decided the gear box oil may be one of the very few service items that are 'captive parts' (like the BMW-only Sachs dampers). Normally, I'm happy to use after-market, but 'BMW-approved', fluids since they are much cheaper than the BMW OE equivalent....but not in the case of gear box oil, unfortunately.
  23. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from billy2981 in Diff oil from the Dealer.   
    LSD oil:
    I agree, it can all be a bit confusing. If the diff on your E39 M5 is functioning normally and not noisy then just go with the Castrol Syntrax Limited Slip 75W-140: it's cheaper and it's officially approved by BMW. If your limited slip diff is noisy then some on the M5board suggest adding a little additional 'friction modifier', which is available in very small bottles from Opie Oils. The friction modifier increases lubricity and will marginally degrade the function of the limited slip differential, depending on how much you put in.....but make the diff quieter.
     
    Have a look at this M5board thread on diff oil, it should give a little more clarity:
    http://www.m5board.com/vbulletin/e39-m5-e52-z8-discussion/136567-bmw-synthetic-diff-fluid.html
     
    I definitely wouldn't be paying silly money for the BMW OE LSD oil, 'FM Booster' or no.
     
    My advice would be: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Just use the Castrol stuff as outlined above.
    (Re-reading the BMW TIS I notice it recommends that the contents of whichever diff oil bottle should be thoroughly mixed/shaken before use.)
     
    Gear box oil:
    I tried chasing down the manufacture of the stuff that goes in the E39 M5 gearbox to see if they sell it on the after-market at a lower price. I think it's made by Exxon-Mobil (Esso) but was left grasping at straws and can't be sure.
     
    So, you're stuck with buying it from BMW or chancing your arm with Royal Purple/Red Line/etc as used by quite a few on the M5board. There are multiple very long threads, with a whole variety of different opinions and conclusions about respective benefits/disadvantages of using the different oils. Reading them will do your head in: it did for mine!
     
    The lowest risk option is to go with the BMW OE stuff labelled MTF-LT-2 (according to BMW TIS this supercedes MTF-LT-1) and can be used in all E39 M5 gearboxes. The downside is the cost. Only available in 5 litre containers if bought mail-order for......£103.97, which is what I paid last year for it via Cotswold, and you'll have about half of it left over after the oil change. Some have had luck in the past going to a dealer in person and buying the exact amount from the parts department (bring-an-empty-bottle sort of thing).
     
    I just didn't want to take a chance as I decided the gear box oil may be one of the very few service items that are 'captive parts' (like the BMW-only Sachs dampers). Normally, I'm happy to use after-market, but 'BMW-approved', fluids since they are much cheaper than the BMW OE equivalent....but not in the case of gear box oil, unfortunately.
  24. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from Neilb in rear discs and pads   
    Totally agree with this /\
     
    New Apec pads and discs on both axles on my Vauxhall Combo van had to be replaced after 18 months and less than 20k miles of pretty gentle driving. Sections of metal had sort of spalled off the front discs making the van shudder alarmingly under the lightest braking. Rear discs were in not as bad but still pretty shocking state. Well worth avoiding anything Apec.
  25. Like
    DepthHoar got a reaction from jamiepeers in Oil, oil, oil - 128k miles...   
    Hi Mike,
     
    0w40 probably won't kill your engine as long as it's a proper fully synthetic but you might find oil consumption goes up a bit, possibly quite a lot if yours is a pre-facelift with the original piston ring set up. Be interesting to know how you get on using the 0W40: it'll be an interesting experiment. There's quite a few M5board members using that grade of oil without ill effect.
     
    This engine oil debate will just keep meandering on and on though. I stick to 10W60 since it's what BMW specify (allegedly...depending on which forum thread you believe).
     
    My main gripe with using 10W60 to a BMW spec is the cost of the stuff. I stepped around the issue by using Shell Helix Ultra Racing which "meets or exceeds" the BMW spec (I know...weasel words) but I could buy it for circa £3.50 a litre in 20 litre drums. It's also conforms to a Ferrari spec so I'm reasonably sure it's OK for the Beast (similar high revving, multi-valve..yadda, yadda). 
     
    I think there's a member on this forum who runs their M5 on generic 5W30 fully synthetic and has done for some time. Would be good to know how he has got on.
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