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Glassman

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About Glassman

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday 11/20/1969

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  • Website URL
    http://www.glasstecpaul.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Google
  • Interests
    http://facebook.com/glasstecauto

Garage

  • Garage
    Dubvan

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  1. Glassman

    Windscreen cracked

    Yes, one way and probably the most unlikeliest possibility you'll be offered as a cause. I would suggest that after two years it is, undoubtedly, impact damage. It's not always apparent especially if the impact point is on the frit. Run a ball point pen along the crack and you'll feel where the impact is. In the 25 years I've been involved in windscreen repair and replacement, and I stand by this, there is no such thing as a 'spontaneous breakage'. Yes, it is possible but it is extremely rare in automotive glazing. The so called 'stress cracks' are usually, 99% of the time down to installer error and will usually manifest themselves within hours of fitting (or the adhesive curing). Two years for a stress breakage? The only possibility I would attribute that to (if not from an impact) is corrosion of the pinchweld.
  2. Glassman

    front windscreen replacement

    This should be discussed when motor insurance is proposed. IOW, you should (and it is a requirement BTW) be made aware of such salient points before inception. http://www.glasstecpaul.com/motor-insurance-windscreen-cover/
  3. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    They're not as expensive as you might think, especially when you consider that the fitting company will have bulk-buy power as well as a wholesale 'arm' to their business. Besides, a couple of backed faulty windscreens are easily written off.
  4. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    Other than from carelessness (of the fitter) there is no damage that can occur.
  5. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    The simple answer would be yes. It does however, depend on the model, age and a few other factors. The factories demand very high quality glass. As you're now experiencing (and I'm sorry you're having such a bad time with it all) there is a massive difference between OE, OEM and 'fake' products.
  6. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    Guilin, China.
  7. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    When you get a chance, have a look at the 'Pilkington' name on the glass. Somewhere around the letters will be a dot, eg, above the P or below the 'n'. Can you see one? This tells us where in the world it was made.
  8. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    What brand of glass is this happening with?
  9. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    Yes, but it's an odious task fraught with many difficulties. I'd love to throw it out there and give you some examples of the angles and circumstances, but 'they' are here and their people are here! For example, National Windscreens were their previous nominated supplier. Every time we found a way through the restrictions, they (Admiral) retrained/revised and amended their policies because National didn't like that they were losing a percentage of what they felt should have been an exclusive relationship; a shrewd move therefore was to train Admiral call centre, and brief the claims department to sure things up. Admiral insurance are one of the largest (motor) insurers in the UK and also get one of the lowest average invoice deals from their nominated glass repairer. It's all about numbers and sheer volume of work they can put their way.
  10. Glassman

    Third replacement windscreen and still problems

    Not sure if serious? The E39 rain sensor mounting plate is a plastic moulding held on to the glass with a special adhesive, and comes fixed to the windscreen. It effectively is the 'eye' or lens part of the sensor itself which is clipped onto it. I wouldn't say it's a common problem as such, but air bubbles do appear more in the non genuine parts.
  11. Glassman

    E39 m5 front windscreen

    Best available glass is OE. There are some decent aftermarket copies, and then there are some that are cheap and nasty for the not so discerning. You'll need a new trim, as well as a new expanding foam strip for the bottom. A decent fitter should be able to provide the correct height blocks (although the existing ones can often be saved). Prices will vary from area to area and firm to firm.
  12. Different spec, different pricing. Remember, the solar coated glass variant will be much more expensive than a bog standard green tinted version with no sensor mount. I'm not justifying the dealer prices, but if money/price was not the issue, most people would opt for genuine parts.
  13. Lifetime = for as long as you own the vehicle. Once the V5 exchanges hands, it ends.
  14. And that's your choice. As another aside, it's also worth considering that some used cars are potentially devalued for not displaying genuine replacement parts, especially for the top of the range models such as M-tech for BMW and RS for Audi. Whilst it may not be a deal breaker, some sales managers at dealerships can - and have - used it as a means to knock a few quid off the trade in price.
  15. Most fitters will only regurgitate what they've been fed. Just because say, Guardian manufacture the Audi A3 windscreen bearing the four rings to make it OE, and another 'aftermarket equivalent' without, it rarely means it is the same glass with or without the (car) manufacturer logo. In fact, most aren't even made in the same factory. In most cases, the hardware will be of a different material, the quality will be discernible and a closer look will usually show some defects in the finished product. That said, it's not to say all non-OEM branded glass is bad, but there has to be a difference in quality; and there is. It cannot simply be the addition or omission of a logo or stamp! Yes, OE parts are expensive and often horrendously expensive, but it's quite ludicrous to make the suggestion that the only difference is a logo. There are only a few exceptions to this. Pilkington and Saint Gobain (Sekurit) are the main OEMs for BMW but with everyone fighting for a slice of the action, don't be surprised to see a car featuring several different (glass) manufacturers.
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