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///M5

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///M5 last won the day on June 9 2020

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About ///M5

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  1. ///M5

    Failed dogbone links - warning aka pitman arms

    The reason I asked the question is that recently I looked at that diagram when looking for specs for the e34 M5 rear axle. I thought that people looking at it could easily assume that the washers fitted above the "dogbone" Then I saw your thread and you had made that assumption. The line drawing is misleading. If you look at it you will see a line going through from the bolt to the trailing arm. This sequence is correct. The other bolt does not have a line. The washer goes above the crossmember and then the nut as in a conventional attachment. I predate the "dogbone". Early BMW's semi trailing arm suspension did not have it. The problem with semi trailing arm is that when the wheel is raised up on cornering there is a change in track width, camber increases and the wheel can "toe out". This made the cars tail happy as the tendency of the wheel to go straight on in a corner so classic over steer. The solution BMW had to tame this in the early eighties was the track link or pitman arm or "dogbone". It limits the pivot axis and reduces the effects of toe out on cornering. I would have read about it in the likes of Auto Car or Motor Magazine. (No internet then ) From your other thread you seem to want to install the parts as BMW intended. The way that your car and the earlier 5,6 and 7 left the factory was with the washer fitted between the "dogbone" and the boss on the trailing arm. The other washer goes above the crossmember and then the nut. https://www.exx.se/maintenance/dogbones/index.shtml This guy has some pictures showing the correct layout. If you look at the image from the BMW etk the layout is also incorrect. If you google BMW e28 dogbone replacement you will see that some people followed the etk and put the washers underneath as in the diagram. There is also the idea of fitting them the right way up. The later parts like yours have a "flat" side and a tapered side. The original part did not have that. There is very little in any workshop manuals about it. To tighten the bolts put the car in what BMW describe as normal position. From memory that is 68kg on each front seat 68kg in the centre of the rear seat 20kg in the boot and a full tank of fuel So if you are not doing that then you are not doing it correctly. (Pay a dealer and see if they do it!!) .
  2. ///M5

    Failed dogbone links - warning aka pitman arms

    Can I ask where you put the washers on the "dogbones" and how you tightened up the bolts. Both of these are important to correct fitting.
  3. What do you have for the manual conversion? Do you have pictures of the parts you have? I have done a manual conversion of an auto and could not get a brake pedal but found a solution. Pictures of your parts may help.
  4. ///M5

    Replacing Rear Subframe Bushes

    Removing the bush is the more difficult part. The ebay tool does not look suitable for removal. The Sealey tool has two lugs that fit into the gap of the bush and allow it to be removed. If the cross-member is removed it is easier to remove and install. For the lubricant you want some thing that evaporates. Soapy water is the original lubricant that will evaporate in time. The gap can come from using a lubricant that is there for too long and the bush moves down causing the gap.
  5. ///M5

    Replacing Rear Subframe Bushes

    The bush should be inserted all the way. They can sometimes move down when the cross member is tightened up hence the gap. Make sure that the area around the bolt on the body is clean and the aluminium from the old bush is removed. The corrosion can cause the top of the bush to not seat fully and the result is the gap.
  6. ///M5

    1986 528i improvement

    You can just get the 3.64 crown wheel and pinion and rebuild your differential with the new ratio. The other option is to fit your Lsd into a 3.64 open differential. Cheapest would be buy a 3.64 Lsd differential and sell your own for the same as you pay for the 3.64.
  7. ///M5

    1976 E12 Windshield instalation

    The way they were done was to put cord into the inner lip seal and cross over for a short section at the bottom. Someone inside pulls the cord which allows the seal to fold over the lip. Another person pushing on the glass from the outside. The trim is inserted after with a tool that the trim fits through, pulling the tool expands the rubber allowing the trim to seat. It expands the rubber to form the seal. The front screen large trim is inserted first then the screen is fitted, followed by the smaller trim. Fit the bottom of the screen first, especially the front as the large trim fitted makes it a little harder. It can be achieved other ways but this is how it was done when all cars had rubber surrounds. It is also what was in the BMW manual. https://magmatools.en.made-in-china.com/product/MefxBktKZZAo/China-Windscreen-Installation-Kit-MG50787-.html I have this set, I have made tools before, but this has all you need.
  8. ///M5

    New bloke with E12 M535i

    That looks great, do not put them on the car they will only get dirty. The plating looks good. They never looked like that new. They used to use cadmium plating which had a green in it. I had some items plated when it was still used and on larger items the green is more visible. I have plated items using the yellow passivate and on larger items there is a green hue in the yellow/gold. That colour seems very even and is probably more popular.
  9. ///M5

    New bloke with E12 M535i

    The Deox C is a good product. I find the solution is great just mix with water and leave the part in until all rust is removed.And it does remove all the rust The gel does the same job but is harder where there are vertical surfaces where it is hard to keep the required depth of coverage. If that is all the rust you have to deal with you are doing well. With the Hydrate 80 or similar they only convert the top layer of rust. I have used it and then removed it mechanically to find the rust still there. I think doing it as you have done should last a long time.
  10. ///M5

    Cat STOLEN

    As above. In chemistry a catalyst is something that can cause or speed up a reaction, and is not consumed in the reaction. If I had only realised they were worth money years ago when I had access to cars being scrapped. It was only when I saw a documentary about the precious metals in everyday materials and the people who collect them. Phones, computers etc. They were making money from peoples waste.
  11. ///M5

    Steering boxes

    What I have noticed is that with the BMW models is that as the cars age and a new model comes out the cars decline in value and there are lots of secondhand parts for little money. Then as time goes on they get scarce and more expensive. The cost of the front struts for an abs e28 made me look at the e34 front struts and adapt a pair to go in an e28, but they are probably expensive now. If your car has a large case differential (210) then the internals of the e34 210 differential will fit so if parts are available they will probably increase in value over time as less parts are available.
  12. ///M5

    New bloke with E12 M535i

    So my memory is okay. I doubted my self and had a quick look at the start of the thread and some one mentioned a black M535i and then the grey cloth made me doubt myself. It shows how memories change with time and small details are misremembered. The butcher was what I came up with, actually a fishmonger. The invoice I remember the figures I would be curious about. The interior I thought was beige but I knew it was a light colour. The name also seems familiar. It was his own company and he mentioned the cost of the car because it was an expensive car at the time. If possible you should see if he is still around. The one thing that was easy to remember was that he had great pride in his car. Glad the cloth is correct, I have made the mistake of buying parts and years later finding they are incorrect. My car is like a 5000 piece jig saw. I have the box but there are no pieces in the box and I have to find the pieces before I do anything.
  13. ///M5

    New bloke with E12 M535i

    I am wrong about your car. Had a look at the pictures of the seat material on the thread. The car I am describing had beige cloth seats and was a dark grey colour so I think it is a different car that I was talking about. The picture from the initial posts looked so similar that I thought it was that car. Hope that the one I described is getting some love.
  14. ///M5

    Steering boxes

    If you look at your hose fittings to picture them side by side on the top of the box, they are quite close on the e34 box but the banjo bolts are the same size on both boxes. The layout on the e28 and e34 are very similar. I have mocked up an e34 subframe steering and suspension to an e28. I cannot remember the hoses though.
  15. ///M5

    New bloke with E12 M535i

    Maybe it is down to what was available at the time. Is it one short or one to many. I think the first owner of your car was the man I met. That would have been back in the 90's. My memory says that maybe he was a butcher by trade. He had the original invoice for the car which you should have, maybe around £13,000. His sale price was i think £6750. I think it was a BMW car club event. He was trying to sell the car then. At that time it was just an old BMW and there was no interest at the price he was selling it at. The car was possibly fourteen or fifteen years old. I saw it for sale for a good while afterwards with no takers at his price. I next saw it for sale at a much higher price as they were slowly getting recognised even though technically rarer than the e28 M5 that I have. (That depends on what you count total production numbers of the model designation or model variation like the e34 M5 touring) The e12 was the forgotten car for a long time. If it is as I remember the first owner was retiring, or just retired so he would be quite old now. If it is the same man and the same car I am sure he would like to know that someone like you is giving it the love it deserves.
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