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///M5

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///M5 last won the day on June 9

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About ///M5

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  1. ///M5

    Instrument battery replacement.

    Put up a picture of your board. Everybody likes pictures. Early cars had different boards and batteries.
  2. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    We all make mistakes. What often happens in these situations is you are too close to the problem. People often do what you do and replace items to see if they work. Then change back when they do not change things. You can then get yourself confused and look for all kinds of problems. When you change a part it should be new or a know working spare. With regard to how it runs as you see it now starts. If you have a good spark at the right time then the car should run. I would double check the leads, put up a photo of the layout and mark them. Check with a multi-meter that each one is correct. Check the spark plugs to see how they look. Things like new leads distributor cap and rotor and spark plugs are a good idea if you have no knowledge of them being changed. How the engine runs is another matter. Fuel pressure is important when the engine is running. What you can try is running the car above idle at about 3000 rpm. See how it runs then. It can often be an idle problem. Air leaks are the biggest problem . The engine could be running too lean. As for the heat generated again simple things like oil and water are correct are things to check. An engine running lean produces more heat. If the engine was not running correctly before then you are back to the start so approach it from that point.
  3. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    I can only go from the photos but it appears that you have mixed up your leads. I have pointed out that the rotor should point to number number 1 plug on the distributor. On your last photo the rotor is pointing to number 1 (when it is put back on) and the marks are all ok. Now the numbers you have used do not relate to the ignition timing. This is where you are going wrong. Do not use the metal spikes as reference. It is the rotor that is important. Looking at your previous photo your lead marked 1 is in fact number 6. Your ignition timing is 180 degrees out Look at the photos I include. Rotor is pointing at number 1 plug on the distributor so number one plug lead goes to number 1 spark plug. Turning clockwise the leads should be 5 then 3 then 6 then 2 then 4 then back to 1 again. To be clear the plug leads are in the wrong order so no start or very poor running If it is not clear then we can go though the leads one by one.
  4. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    That is correct. If you put the rotor arm on the centre of the brass part should be opposite that notch. You have not shown where the OT mark. No picture of the camshaft marks. From the previous photos the camshaft marks will not line up. Your camshaft timing is not as BMW specified. It looks to be a few degrees advanced. How much could be measured. I am making an assumption that the car ran before hand. Advancing a cam can improve mid range acceleration and may have been deliberate. As you have seen it takes two turns of the crankshaft for one turn of the camshaft. It is possible (and has been done) to have the valve or ignition timing 180 degrees out. If you look at the photo you can see the pistons of an engine at top dead centre. You can see that two pistons are at the top 1 and 4 (4 cylinder engine) In your engine (6 cylinder) number 1 and 6 are at the top. Number one is at the firing point and number 6 has pushed all of the gases out of the exhaust. So with regard to your engine you have checked the valve timing (which has more advance than standard) Ignition timing is in the correct static timing. You should now start the car and set the ignition timing with the engine running. But............... it does not start. So check again that the spark plugs have a spark by removing them and placing on the valve cover or good earth. Do not hold them in your hand as you could get quite a shock of them. You then know that it is not a spark issue. There is spark and it is at the right time (basic). So the next check is for fuel and air. Next thing is to check, is the fuel pump is running. When trying to start the car go to the back of the car on the right hand side on the inside of the wheel you should hear the pump running. It is also possible to check the pump by sending 12v+ to terminal 88d Green/ violet wire on the combination relay which should be mounted on the LHS wing beside the coolant reservoir. It can also be done by moving the flap on the air flow meter but try easy way first. One thing to make sure is that the rotor is correctly seated when installing.
  5. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    From your last photos you are 180 degrees out. I do not think you understand what I have said. In the last photos what I see is:- The crankshaft is at top dead centre. The OT mark lines up correctly but the camshaft is not in the correct position. It is 180 degrees out. Number 1 lobes are not pointing down and number 6 is not on the overlap (as I said it is called rocking which if you look you will see why, as at that point turning the engine either way will cause the valves on no 6 to open the lobe form a "V") The distributor appears to be pointing at number 1. What you need to do:- Rotate the engine crankshaft again until the marks (OT) line up. Make sure that the camshaft no.1 lobes pointing down no. 6 "rocking. distributor pointing to number terminal. Remove that cover under the rotor arm and you should see the mark on the body. Take photos of this position.
  6. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    From the photo the valve timing looks incorrect but photo may be deceptive. Rotate the crankshaft until the OT mark lines up with the mark on the front case. Take a photo of the positions then and where the rotor is pointing on the distributor. The crankshaft mark lined up, then the bolt should line up with the casting on the head and the rotor pointing to number 1 on the distributor. That is how the timing should be. Valve timing and ignition timing at correct static positions.
  7. ///M5

    Bmw e28 progress pics

    Dirtydirtydiesel off the topic but the e21 323i for as you know for anybody who has never driven one they were dangerous/ great fun. You needed to keep the side windows clean, because you could be looking out of them at any time. When you start the father son project it has to be an e21 (maybe not 323i) and put it on here.
  8. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    Jack the car up and try from underneath as there is more access. Do not forget axle stands or solid support.
  9. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    From your photos I thought it looked incorrect. I have modified your photo to show how it is wrong. Also is a diagram of valve overlap. In your photo number 6 is not on the over lap. As I have said about the marks on the crankshaft pulley they are there to set up valve timing and ignition timing. This is important! If the position in the photo is with the marks lined up then the valve timing is incorrect. You should be able to get a socket on the crankshaft nut without removing the radiator.
  10. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    A picture from the internet. The crankshaft nut is the large (36mm)nut in the centre of the circle of smaller nuts. Turning clockwise rotates the engine. From the picture I find it difficult to see both lobes clearly. If you look at the photo with the crankshaft nut you will see a mark on the front casing above the pulley. There is also white paint on the pulley for the timing mark. When you are at top dead centre on the compression stroke you should see a mark on this pulley with OT on it. The mark must line up with the mark on the aluminium cover. The lobes of the crankshaft on number one cylinder point down so the valves are closed. Number six should be on the overlap or what was called "rocking". The camshaft lobes form a "V" The exhaust lobe points to the right and the inlet points to the left (As viewed in your photo). When this is correct then the rotor arm should point to number 1 coil lead. There may be a notch on the distributor body under a dust shield if fitted. In your photo the exhaust lobe looks close but unlike looking directly I find it hard to tell. If all lines up as stated then the static ignition is correct so it should try to start. You could put up pictures of this to check if you want.
  11. ///M5

    Bmw e28 progress pics

    Hi dirtydirtydiesel I agree with you with regard to Rich28 and his project. Remarkable achievements. There is an old saying "if you want something done ask a busy person". I think he is a good example of this. When I first started working on cars there was no internet and knowledge was power so people would often not give it away easily so I appreciate where you came from. From your car list, learned to drive in a mini at 17 first BMW an e21 at 21
  12. ///M5

    Bmw e28 progress pics

    Here are a couple of photos of the process I mentioned. I took a template of an e28 driver door top and made this piece to show what I mentioned. The puckering is necessary where the metal curves. The excess metal is then hammered flat with a hide faced hammer onto the insert of metal and finally the slight curve was formed. you can then remove the thin metal insert. The area in the last photo shows the area of extra metal. You can file this smoother as the metal is thicker at that point.
  13. ///M5

    BMW e12 m535i 1980 wont start

    Hi PatMo I suggested the pulse transmitter because I thought you were having intermittent problems and then no start. From your post you have no start but you have a spark at the plugs. If you have a spark at the plugs then the ignition side is working. By removing the distributor you have possibly changed the ignition timing so the first thing to check is the static timing. Turn the engine by a spanner on the crankshaft (clockwise) until the mark on the crankshaft pulley (O/T) is opposite the fixed mark on the front cover. This is top dead centre. To check it is on the compression stroke remove the valve cover and check the camshaft lobes of number one cylinder (the front of engine), both lobes should be facing down. The rotor arm should be pointing to number one terminal on the distributor cap. There should be a mark on the distributor body. Then check the rotation of the rotor it should point to 1 then next is 5,3,6,2,4. Check to make sure the leads are correct. By checking this you are making sure that the spark is at the right time in the cycle. If it is then you are looking for a fuel or air problem.
  14. ///M5

    Bmw e28 progress pics

    With that piece if you mark the curve on a flat piece then mark another line with a parallel curve for the flange then using a pliers you slowly follow the inner line slowly bending over with the tip of the pliers on the line. You can also use clamp to the edge of a bench and use a small chisel on the line and slowly hit with a hammer to tip the edge over. Your bead roller can do it with a tipping die. Slowly bend it over and place a thin piece of metal (1.2mm) and flatten onto it. You can then curve the complete section. Curving it gently to the correct profile. To check if it needs to shrinking make a card template and see if there is any puckering on the card. If there is then it needs to be shrunk in the area of the puckering. From the photo the top part may need a slight shrinking. Using the method of folding with a thin nose pliers will create a series of puckers on the curve. Hammering on a dolly with a hide or plastic hammer will tend to shrink the metal. When it is beaten flat on the insert of metal then slowly bend to the correct profile. When it is correct remove the metal strip and it should be like the original.
  15. ///M5

    Bmw e28 progress pics

    When you are repairing the door I would suggest that you tack the all the pieces in place and then put the seal on and fit the door to check the lines and that the door seal sits correctly especially at that top corner. If the seal is incorrect the door may be difficult to close or may leak. Any mistakes can be fixed by undoing the tacks rather than cutting out the sections again. Using reference marks on the door helps. If you mark a point back from an edge at say 100mm then when the new piece goes in it must be 100mm from your mark. A number of marks helps to position accurately.
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