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RichardP

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Everything posted by RichardP

  1. RichardP

    The story of E39 M5 AK03 DJJ (so far)

    Thanks. 19 years since it rolled off the production line today.
  2. On 11th March 2003 E39 M5 reg AK03 DJJ was first registered in the UK by Sycamore BMW of Peterborough, 14 years ago today. I've posted quite a few threads in various places about my M5, but there has never been a single thread that's covered my ownership of the car. Quite a lot of information has been lost on various forums that have died, BMW Land and M5 Torque being two that come to mind. This forum too seemed to come pretty close too due to the tragic death of Darren last year. So I thought I'd try and document my ownership from scratch in one place rather than start another thread about things that I've done recently, it seemed a fitting day to start the task. CB37514 was built on 15 October 2002, so she was probably sitting around in the showroom at Sycamore for several months before being registered as one of the few 03 plate E39 M5s in the UK. There have been 4 former keepers, Sycamore being the first, Lord Edward James Russell being the 4th. I first saw the car for sale at Hexagon of Highgate in September 2008, the advertised price was, for that time, very high at just under £24,000 for a 40,000 mile car. I actually ruled it out as being too expensive. I was trying to sell an early E60 535d that had belonged to my father, it was 3 years old and had only done a little over 7,000 miles. The E60 was an odd spec. a non Sport 535d in Chiaretto Red with grey interior, no Bluetooth but a HUD. It was not a good time to be trying to sell a slightly odd car! I'd looked around locally and the best offer I'd had was under £10k. I considered keeping the car myself, but after doing a couple of trips decided that I could not live with the soft suspension, auto 'box and the E60 styling. I though, why not see what Hexagon would offer against their expensive E39 M5. To my amazement, they offered me just under £18k without even seeing the car. As the effective price was now only £16k the M5 suddenly went from expensive to very good value. A trip to Hexagon and an inspection and test drive in the M5 soon lead to a deal being done. I collected the car from Hexagon on 28 November 2008, a rather chilly day with a little snow at home on my return. So began my ownership of an E39 M5!
  3. RichardP

    The story of E39 M5 AK03 DJJ (so far)

    Another year passes and another MOT pass with no advisories. Just under 500 miles this year since the last MOT, not a lot, but enough to keep things moving. Miraculously managed to get out and back without catching any rain, the E34 is unlikely to be so lucky, so she is now tucked up and probably won't come out again until next spring.
  4. RichardP

    Price please

    61 34 1 364 532 Thanks.
  5. RichardP

    E34 M5 Touring restoration

    Gradually working my way down the list of unobtainable parts that need replacing! Two down today. First the passenger side (right) sun visor microswitch that is activated my the mirror door for the light had failed. Black sun visors are very hard to find, used ones are usually in poor condition, and they are impossible to take apart without pretty much destroying. Finally found one is Russia, so now at last the vanity mirror light works. Not 100% perfect, maybe 97%, there is a small scratch in the mirror and a small amount of the weld around the mirror has broken off, but at least it works. I may investigate opening up the original, fixing the microswitch and having them covered in Alcantara to match the roof. The second unobtainable part was the sill plate with the ///M5 logo for the back door. Over the last couple of years I've managed to find two front NOS parts and one rear used but in good condition. Just the passenger side rear to fix. The issue is that the rubber ends perish and disintegrate. Many people just cut them off and leave the ends square, I decided to try and repair them. I found some 'donor' sill covers, cut the ends off and attached them to the M5 covers. Before : The rubber ends just crumbled in my fingers. After attaching the new ends with black Shoe Goo which remains flexible but solid. Again, not 100% as there is still some wear on the sill covers themselves, but a significant improvement.
  6. I first bought a BMW nearly 30 years ago, that was an E30 325i Touring and since then I’ve had an E36 328i, E46 330i and E46 330d Tourings. My current BMW’s are all M cars, but I miss not having a Touring. There are only 2 official BMW M car Tourings, the E34 M5 and the E61 M5, neither were built in large numbers. My preference has always been for a manual gear box, so in late 2015 I started looking for a decent E34 Touring that was fundamentally sound but maybe needed a little work. The problem is that the E34 Touring is a very usable vehicle and most E34 M5’s have been used, a lot. There are very few about that have done less than 100,000 miles, most have done significantly more. I looked at a few but none met my criteria and most had significant rust on the main chassis. A rare manual 4.6 E34 Alpina Touring that had been restored was for sale in Germany and I briefly contemplated that as an alternative. Many would argue that it’s a better car than the E34 M5, the Alpina modified V8 being much more flexible, having similar power but more torque than the rather highly strung 3.8 version of the straight 6 S38. But for some reason there is something I prefer about M cars to Alpinas, can’t put my finger on it but the Alpina was not for me. There is also some sense of destiny with the evolution of the initial M88/1 in the M1 and it’s final evolution of the S38B38 in the E34 M5. By mid 2017 I’d just about given up hope of finding a suitable E34 M5 Touring and started looking at the E61 M5 instead. Obvious benefits were that it was available in right hand drive and is a more modern car. Then there is that V10 engine, but there is also that gearbox! There was a low mileage, high spec car for sale not very far from me, so I arranged to go and look at it. While I was in the car on the way, my phone rang. Someone had found an E34 Touring that was not ‘officially’ for sale, but it would be open to sensible offers. I went ahead and looked at the E61 anyway, it was in very good condition and had obviously been well looked after, the owner had several other very nice cars including a Ferrari Daytona in their garage. However, with the prospect of a suitable E34 with a colour scheme I wanted (Avus Blue silver accents and black interior) and the E61 with a colour and interior that is probably my least favorite (Silverstone with Silverstone interior), I decided not to go down that route. My first sight of BL01698 was just via some pictures taken by a friend who lived nearer to it than me. Initial looks made me wonder if this would be a good choice after all! I had been told that it was a 6 speed car, actually it’s the earlier 5 speed version. The mileage was more than I’d been told, but still low at a little over 77,000. Apparently the car had had a minor scrape down the passenger side, then been left awaiting repair. The minor scrape was not quite as minor as I had hoped and a lot of the ancillary components were looking decidedly crusty. The interior was reasonable, except for the front seats that were showing quite a lot of wear and has some strange scratches, as though someone had been wearing a studded belt or something similar. On the plus side, maybe the 5 speed box is not a bad thing, they are readily available if something does go wrong with them, unlike the 6 speed which is pretty much unique to the E34 M5. Some reports also claim that the earlier 5 speed is nicer to drive. The car has Hi-Fi speaker system and full leather dash which makes the interior feel a bit more special. It also has a factory fitted tow hitch which was one of the things I really wanted, the tow hitch mounting was a little scabby though. The engine had had major a rebuild quite recently, so the internals would not need any work at all even if it looked pretty scabby on the outside. A closer inspection of the vehicle chassis revealed that it was mainly in pretty good condition. The decision was made; BL01698 would undergo a total restoration by Munch Legends. Pretty much everything was stripped off the car, engine, sub frames, fuel tank, heat shields, sun roof, doors, tail gate, front wings and ancillaries in the engine bay etc. One of the front wings was a little rusty and the two passenger side doors were damaged enough to warrant replacement. On examination at the body shop it was decided that the cost of replacing the driver’s side doors and other front wing would cost little more, possibly less, than prepping the originals. The entire underside, including the inner front wings, was bag sealed. The original active shock absorbers were sent to Poland to be refurbished, the rest of the suspension components, drive shafts, brake dust shields, and sub-frames etc. were either replaced or refurbished and powder coated. The diff was rebuilt and painted where appropriate. All brake calipers were rebuilt and passivated, along with all other unpainted underbody components. Most of the rubber and trim pieces were replaced where still available from BMW. All engine covers, plenum, water pump etc. were vapor blasted and repainted where required. Brake lines, fuel lines, fuel tank and all clips etc. were replaced. The fitted Powerflow rear silencer was replaced with an OEM part. The wheels on the car were rather nasty two piece after market design and the outer rims were badly corroded. There were replaced with the correct M5 Throwing Star wheels with new Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tyres. The sun roof was jammed pretty much solid, but eventually opened up to allow refurbishment. Most of the work on the chassis and running gear is now complete, there are still a few bits and pieces left to sort out. The tailgate needs fitting and the sun roof is in pieces awaiting reassembly and refitting. The interior has not been touched yet, apart from removing parts to allow for removal of the sun roof cassette and facilitate other work. I have quite a few pictures of the work being done, for now I’m just going to post a comparison of some of the original pictures and the same area as it is now, plus of couple of the whole car and underside. Please remember, this is still work in progress. And a couple of pictures as she stands now
  7. RichardP

    My E26!

    So, at last, after the best part of a year, I finally have my M1 at home! After keeping my eye out for a long time for an M1 I found one in July last year that looked like it fitted the bill. As with many M1’s the car history is not fully known, but it was first supplied by BMW leasing to an address in Munich in 1980 and from there found its way to Switzerland from where it was imported to the UK, but not registered, in 2011. Mechanically the car is in very good condition, there are some cosmetic rubber components that are not 100%, but replacements for most M1 parts are very difficult to find. The engine is not the original, the engine number on the block does not match up with the number it should, it’s not even the correct format! However, it appears that the engine is of a higher performance than standard. There was a company that tuned M1 engines, it’s possible that this is one of these. The car was also fitted with a stainless steel silencer. The car was originally white, at some point had been painted silver and then painted white again. The last repaint was done by a company that specialised in building luxury fibre glass yachts and they have done a very good job of painting the fibre glass body. The interior was originally black leather and cloth but, possibly when painted silver, had been re-trimmed in red leather with red carpets. I believe that the dash had also been covered red, but this had been reverted to black because of reflections on the windscreen. The interior had been done very well, but I wanted to return it to as close to original as possible. Also, the way the carpet had been done it was difficult to use the accelerator without hitting the brake, unless you had very narrow feet!! This is what it looked like when I bought it. Sourcing the materials required to restore it to its original appearance took much, much longer than I anticipated. The seat cloth is unique to the M1 but I managed to find a source in Germany and bought 4 sq m plus a genuine roof panel which is covered in the same material (the roof had been covered red too). The leather used in the M1 has finish that is difficult to replicate, you can get close but not exactly the same using widely available leather. Again I managed to source some of the original leather, a total of 18 sq m was needed, 4 full hides. I also found a genuine new hand brake lever and handle and a new gear knob. The backs of the seats are covered in a black tweed like cloth, this proved very difficult to find something that looked identical and impossible to find the original material. Eventually I managed to find some material that was a pretty close match. The carpets turned out to be very frustrating. There are 9 pieces of carpet, two floor pieces, 2 wheel arch pieces, two pieces down each side of the transmission tunnel (4 in all) and a piece at the back. I managed to find 5 genuine pieces of the 9 pieces required, but the material is impossible to replicate. In the end I had to settle for a reasonable colour match high quality carpet, it’s probably much better quality than the original, but I was a little disappointed that I could not use the genuine stuff. Other miscellaneous parts that were required were a replacement radio (which currently does not work!), a brand new set of original floor mats (which need to be fastened down somehow as they currently slide right under the pedals!), a genuine replacement rear silencer and twin black tail pipes, replacement rear window seal, black flock finish centre cubby hole (the original had been covered red), leather covered ash tray, a genuine rear ///M1 decal (from the USA), new wheel centre caps with the old BMW logo and I even found an original unused M1 English instruction manual. I also found a genuine new mph speedometer, the original kph speedometer rear just 5055 when replaced, I don’t know if this is the original, it may have been replaced when the engine was replaced. A selection of hoses and gaskets and other odds and ends were obtained from BMW classic, I wasn’t sure if they would be needed or not but though it best to start building a spares bank just in case! I collected the car from Munich Legends on 1st July after they had given it a thorough inspection. I drove it to a Shell garage and back to fill up with V-Power, just enough to get the car good and hot. We then did a final inspection on the ramps to check for any leaks, remarkably there was nothing at all, dry as a bone, the ML techs said they had never seen an M1 with no leaks! I left ML to drive the car home just after midday, you might remember that 1st July was a rather hot day, my route took me clockwise round the M25 past Heathrow where the recorded temperature reached 36.7C! I was a little apprehensive to say the least, the temperature on the motorway was probably significantly higher, but the car did not miss a beat over the 275 mile trip. The air con is rather rudimentary, but it did its job, just! I’ve had the car up on ramps again since I got home, still pretty much bone dry, just a very small amount of sweating from a couple of places. Things left to do include: - Repair the radio - Repair the clock, some of the illuminated elements don’t work. - Find a way to anchor the floor mats. - Find a way to secure the spare wheel, there were two designs, the one that matches the main wheels can’t be fastened down using the supplied bolt! - Find a replacement left front indicator, it has a small crack, part NLA. - Find a replacement right window guide, it has a small cut, part NLA. - Find as many spare parts as possible! Finally, here are a couple of pictures as she is now, I'll add some more detailed pictures later.
  8. RichardP

    Simply BMW at Beaulieu - 19th September 2021

    Yes, that’s me (not the guy with the pram!).
  9. RichardP

    Radio switches off every 25-30 mins

    I believe this may be caused by a faultily ignition switch. If the radio turns off after almost exactly 20 minutes than this points to the radio working in 'ignition off' mode, it's designed to turn off after 20 min to save power. My guess is that the radio comes on when you pass through the accessory position I, but then the ignition power is not live when in the running position II. This is the flat pin radio pinout (ignore sub connectors B and C as the 'Integrated' radio does not use them) Check the voltage on pin 16 with the ignition in various positions.
  10. RichardP

    Simply BMW at Beaulieu - 19th September 2021

    Unless the weather is utterly dire I'll be going, I promised myself I'd go to some different things this year. Went to Caffeine and Machine earlier in the year with the E39 M5, I'm free next week end and the E26 is itching for a run now it's odometer is fixed. Just about a 600 mile round trip, should be enough to blow the cobwebs away.
  11. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    The boot loader is newer than I thought it might be, so I 'think' you will be OK. The issue I have in checking this is that I don't think I have an easy way to downgrade the bootloader on the Intravee I have. The newer firmware has a console command to update the boot loader with whatever version is imbedded in the main firmware, but the older firmware does not. Worst case is that on start up the bootloader will time out before the checksum on the main firmware has finished and it will drop back to the boot loader. If that happens you'll need to go back to a version of the firmware that does not take so long to check. I've attached the 5.31-306 firmware for you to use in this eventuality so you can get back to where you are now. Let me know how you get on and take a few screen shots as you program the IV and as it boots up for the first time. ivfw256-v5.31-306.zip
  12. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    Could you confirm the version of the bootloader please. To do this with V5.31 you'll need to connect a PC and use the downloader, the watch the IV while it boots into the bootloader. To do this type the command boot You should see something like this : boot >boot< BOOT V5.5 (RR=00) Boot Entry flag set Intravee Bootloader Ver 5.5 SP=0x217D (8575) IVBL 5.5> The version here is 5.5, yours will be lower. Then boot to the app type the command b this will reboot the Intravee normally.
  13. RichardP

    2001 E39 M5 sells at auction for £32,600

    Oops, yes of course, £20,695.
  14. RichardP

    2001 E39 M5 sells at auction for £32,600

    This is getting silly, static value over August. 1st September £20,6695
  15. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    I think the best way forward is going to be for me to program an IV2 with 5.31-306 plus it's associated bootloader and then upgrade it and see what happens. If there are any issues I can then work out how to overcome them and let you know the procedure.
  16. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    Just to add, I have got a copy of 5.31-306 firmware so if you did update and get stuck, you could return the Intravee to it's current state.
  17. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    That is definitely a 256 processor, so will take the most recent firmware, it's just got a very old version on it at the moment. BUT, I seem to remember that there was an issue with the time out in the bootloader when calculating the checksum of the later (bigger) firmware and the timeout had to be increased. I can't remember (I've searched previous e-mails etc and can't find it either) which versions of the firmware had this issue and when it was fixed. The solution was a special version of the firmware that was small but updated the bootloader to the version with the longer time out. If you update with the newer 'big' firmware, the old bootloader with try and check the firmware on boot and it will fail as it takes too long. The Intravee with then drop back into the bootloader. At that point you will be stuck until you either go back to a smaller version of the firmware or update the bootloader. I'll continue to hunt to see if I can find anything that tells me when the issue was fixed.
  18. RichardP

    General Intravee II doubts

    Can you post, or PM, a picture of the label on the Intravee before I answer that. With that firmware version it may be a 128 rather than 256 version of the processor.
  19. RichardP

    Show us pics of your none 5 BMW

    It would be rude not to. The only non 5 BMW I have now.
  20. RichardP

    My E26!

    Pretty much since I bought the car I've wanted to be able take a picture like this. Not particularly note worthy in itself, and shows the dire state of the tarmac on our drive. But it does show three things that have changed since I got the car. 1) As in a previous post the exhaust cut out is now correct. 2) As a side effect of fixing the exhaust cut out, the demarcation line between the white bumper and black central strip on the back of the car is now much straighter (maybe not 100% perfect, but not far off). There is a small grove running around the black strip and it's depth was not uniform in the area above the exhaust cut out. This meant that the line could not be straight. Here is a picture of how it used to be : 3) Finally, Pirelli have started re-making the original Cinturato P7 N4 tread pattern tyres that the M1 came with when new, somehow the rhomboid blocks of the tread pattern just look right on the car and keeps it in character as a car from the 1980's.
  21. RichardP

    New to intravee

    The sensors never show the full level, so with a 70l tank and the hose, your figures sound about right.
  22. RichardP

    New to intravee

    (R) indicates reserve, it should be displayed soon after the fuel warning light comes on.
  23. RichardP

    E34 M5 Touring restoration

    A while since I updated this thread. I found that the HVAC blower fan was working at full speed and at a very slow speed when set to just under max, otherwise nothing. I know that this was not the motor, so thought it might either be the potentiometers on the control panel or the 'Sword' (more sophisticated fan controller than the 'hedgehogs' used in newer cars). Thought I might as well check both. Took the control panel out and that all looked good. While I was there, found that the metal DIN cage was preventing the BMW Professional radio from mounting correctly. The radio has two tabs that operate on a slightly angled screw which tightens directly to plastic frame. So out came the metal cage that had been previously fitted with the nasty Sony head unit that was in the car when I bought it. The radio now sits more firmly and slightly deeper into the dash than previously. That left the most likely culprit as the sword that was not working properly, so I replaced it with a new one and will at some point attempt repair of the old one with newer, higher power, MOSFETS. The fan is now working correctly with a full speed range. As getting at the sword is a bit of a pain (remove trim over pedals on drivers side, unplug HVAC controller, remove glove box, remove trim to the side, remove footwell vent pipe, unplug other side of HVAC controller and remove, unplug and remove sword). While in there I did the microfilter too, just one extra cover to remove, and cleaned out various crap that had accumulated between it and the microfilter, quite possibly the cause of the sword failing due to lack of air flow and consequential over heating. and replaced the microfilter which had seen better days, new and old. The old one must have been fitted in the UK as it's the split version for RHD cars, necessary to get round the steering column. Of course when removing the trim I noticed that several tabs were broken from previous removal attempts, it's 30 year old plastic after all, so fitted a new piece after transferring the self adhesive sound insulation from the old one as the new piece does not come with it. I also noticed that the surround to the glove box light switch in the trim above the glove box was broken, so replaced that too (again transferring the sound insulation). Replaced the central rear bumper trim too as the tabs were worn and it would not hold fully into the bumper. Did the drivers side rear rubbing strip at the same time as that was a little scuffed. I don't like driving older cars without having a fire extinguisher in the car, so found an OEM mounting bracket, bought a new extinguisher and fitted it. Very easy job with just 4 bolts that go into captive nuts. Existing holes in the drivers seat: Mounting plate in place Extinguisher fitted: Used her for what she was built for the other day too, needed to have the wheels for the E26 tided up, not a full refurb, just the inside of the barrel and rear faces repainted. Being Magnesium they are a little tricky to do, so sent them to a place I've used before in Hereford. I thought it best to collect them in person rather than risk a courier for their return (amazing that 'wheels' are specifically excluded from insurance in the small print for most couriers!). So went on a 400 mile round trip to pick them up, then loaded the tyres in the back as well to take them to my local tyre fitters. The eagle eyed may notice that the tyres are original tread pattern Pirelli P7 Cinturato N4. These were the original fitment on the E26 and Pirelli started making them again recently in sizes for the E26, several Porsches and the Lamborghini Countach, another OCD itch scratched!
  24. RichardP

    What did you do to your E39 today ?

    You don't need the roof box, you have a Touring.
  25. RichardP

    What have you done on your E34 Today

    Blower fan was not working properly at slower speeds so replaced this Some E34s use a MOSFET device to control the fan speed rather than the resistor pack that's used in E34's without climate control and other newer cars, it's commonly called the Sword due to it's appearance. Just as the resistor packs fail, so does the Sword. It should be repairable by reflowing the soldered joints and replacing the MOSFETs, for now I just replaced it. One of the causes of failure is due to a build up of crap in the microfilter which reduces air flow and causes the Sword to run too hot, eventually causing the MOSFETs to burn out. So while replacing the Sword, I also replaced the microfilter which may have been just a little overdue. This is common as it's a bit of a bitch to get at. Plenty of detritus inside the housing, which I cleared out New and old filters: The old filter was a RHD version, it's split in two to enable you to fit it without removing the steering column, the LDH part does not need to be split as it's fitted from the passenger side footwell, you 'just' have to remove the glovebox, some trim and some of the vent pipes.
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