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  1. 21 points
    Sandip

    Today we remember Donut

    Today marks the passing of a year since we lost the man who was a friend to many and a figurehead of our community. As we take a moment to reflect on the loss that is to our online family, spare a thought for his real-life family as they remember their good times with Darren. This forum owes a great debt to Donut. The thriving membership we enjoy; the positive attitude of our collective - these are things Darren worked hard to achieve. Our own tribute is to strive to stay true to his guidance, to ensure that the forum is the best it can be and that we continue to build not just a resource for all things 5 Series, but a thriving community. Donut set a high benchmark, and while we may have struggled at times to hit his high standards, we will always aim to continue the good work he did. There was an overwhelming response to fundraising for the Wiltshire Air Ambulance last year. Darren's family have asked us to pass on a message of thanks to each and every one of you who donated so generously, and have asked us to share this certificate by way of thanks. Let's all find a moment today to remember the Boss Man. Find yourself a quiet moment with a sugary baked good, look back on the impact Darren had on our lives and give thanks for what we have. On behalf of all of us at BMW5
  2. 15 points
    RichardP

    E34 M5 Touring restoration

    I first bought a BMW nearly 30 years ago, that was an E30 325i Touring and since then I’ve had an E36 328i, E46 330i and E46 330d Tourings. My current BMW’s are all M cars, but I miss not having a Touring. There are only 2 official BMW M car Tourings, the E34 M5 and the E61 M5, neither were built in large numbers. My preference has always been for a manual gear box, so in late 2015 I started looking for a decent E34 Touring that was fundamentally sound but maybe needed a little work. The problem is that the E34 Touring is a very usable vehicle and most E34 M5’s have been used, a lot. There are very few about that have done less than 100,000 miles, most have done significantly more. I looked at a few but none met my criteria and most had significant rust on the main chassis. A rare manual 4.6 E34 Alpina Touring that had been restored was for sale in Germany and I briefly contemplated that as an alternative. Many would argue that it’s a better car than the E34 M5, the Alpina modified V8 being much more flexible, having similar power but more torque than the rather highly strung 3.8 version of the straight 6 S38. But for some reason there is something I prefer about M cars to Alpinas, can’t put my finger on it but the Alpina was not for me. There is also some sense of destiny with the evolution of the initial M88/1 in the M1 and it’s final evolution of the S38B38 in the E34 M5. By mid 2017 I’d just about given up hope of finding a suitable E34 M5 Touring and started looking at the E61 M5 instead. Obvious benefits were that it was available in right hand drive and is a more modern car. Then there is that V10 engine, but there is also that gearbox! There was a low mileage, high spec car for sale not very far from me, so I arranged to go and look at it. While I was in the car on the way, my phone rang. Someone had found an E34 Touring that was not ‘officially’ for sale, but it would be open to sensible offers. I went ahead and looked at the E61 anyway, it was in very good condition and had obviously been well looked after, the owner had several other very nice cars including a Ferrari Daytona in their garage. However, with the prospect of a suitable E34 with a colour scheme I wanted (Avus Blue silver accents and black interior) and the E61 with a colour and interior that is probably my least favorite (Silverstone with Silverstone interior), I decided not to go down that route. My first sight of BL01698 was just via some pictures taken by a friend who lived nearer to it than me. Initial looks made me wonder if this would be a good choice after all! I had been told that it was a 6 speed car, actually it’s the earlier 5 speed version. The mileage was more than I’d been told, but still low at a little over 77,000. Apparently the car had had a minor scrape down the passenger side, then been left awaiting repair. The minor scrape was not quite as minor as I had hoped and a lot of the ancillary components were looking decidedly crusty. The interior was reasonable, except for the front seats that were showing quite a lot of wear and has some strange scratches, as though someone had been wearing a studded belt or something similar. On the plus side, maybe the 5 speed box is not a bad thing, they are readily available if something does go wrong with them, unlike the 6 speed which is pretty much unique to the E34 M5. Some reports also claim that the earlier 5 speed is nicer to drive. The car has Hi-Fi speaker system and full leather dash which makes the interior feel a bit more special. It also has a factory fitted tow hitch which was one of the things I really wanted, the tow hitch mounting was a little scabby though. The engine had had major a rebuild quite recently, so the internals would not need any work at all even if it looked pretty scabby on the outside. A closer inspection of the vehicle chassis revealed that it was mainly in pretty good condition. The decision was made; BL01698 would undergo a total restoration by Munch Legends. Pretty much everything was stripped off the car, engine, sub frames, fuel tank, heat shields, sun roof, doors, tail gate, front wings and ancillaries in the engine bay etc. One of the front wings was a little rusty and the two passenger side doors were damaged enough to warrant replacement. On examination at the body shop it was decided that the cost of replacing the driver’s side doors and other front wing would cost little more, possibly less, than prepping the originals. The entire underside, including the inner front wings, was bag sealed. The original active shock absorbers were sent to Poland to be refurbished, the rest of the suspension components, drive shafts, brake dust shields, and sub-frames etc. were either replaced or refurbished and powder coated. The diff was rebuilt and painted where appropriate. All brake calipers were rebuilt and passivated, along with all other unpainted underbody components. Most of the rubber and trim pieces were replaced where still available from BMW. All engine covers, plenum, water pump etc. were vapor blasted and repainted where required. Brake lines, fuel lines, fuel tank and all clips etc. were replaced. The fitted Powerflow rear silencer was replaced with an OEM part. The wheels on the car were rather nasty two piece after market design and the outer rims were badly corroded. There were replaced with the correct M5 Throwing Star wheels with new Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tyres. The sun roof was jammed pretty much solid, but eventually opened up to allow refurbishment. Most of the work on the chassis and running gear is now complete, there are still a few bits and pieces left to sort out. The tailgate needs fitting and the sun roof is in pieces awaiting reassembly and refitting. The interior has not been touched yet, apart from removing parts to allow for removal of the sun roof cassette and facilitate other work. I have quite a few pictures of the work being done, for now I’m just going to post a comparison of some of the original pictures and the same area as it is now, plus of couple of the whole car and underside. Please remember, this is still work in progress. And a couple of pictures as she stands now
  3. 14 points
    So after a post in the "What have you done to your car today?" thread a couple of people wanted to see dashcam install. Transcend 220 with permanent mount from Amazon and Nextbase wiring kit from Maplin: Power wire goes up in to the gap between trim and windscreen: Runs to the nearside A pillar and crosses over in the gap between the two pieces of trim (red line to show): It helps if it's a warm day as it makes the plastic and cable a little more pliable. Use a blunt piece of plastic to get the cable in the gap. Wire then goes under the rubber door seal: And runs down the door seal to the little panel where the passenger airbag switch is: The switch panel is removed by pulling: And working your way round: When you get all the way the panel just pops off (don't unplug the airbag switch!): You can then push the trim to get the wire in to the area behind the glovebox: There is a little access panel at the back of the glovebox which you remove to get to the fusebox. The piggyback goes to fuse 54. I needed to trim the the black plastic where the red cable goes in to the piggyback. You can see the silver conductor where i've trimmed the plastic. Otherwise the plastic stops a good fit: Metal framework behind the glovebox gives you a good place for the camera ground: And that's it. Took about 20 minutes to do. Fuse 54 goes live as soon as as the car is unlocked and goes to sleep about 10 minutes after the car is locked.
  4. 14 points
    Conan

    So I picked up my M5 Touring

    Initial impressions are that we are going to be firm friends!
  5. 12 points
    I recently replaced one of the air springs on my F11. I'd already had one replaced a few months ago by an indy garage while the car was with them for some other work but after it started to drop occasionally at the opposite corner I decided to try changing it myself. Armed with the help and advice of @Munzy123 and @HandyAndy_UK among others the job was really quite easy and as long as you have a good jack and some stands available the only other equipment you'd need would be a largeish screwdriver and a 10mm open ended spanner. Oh, and a laptop with ISTA+ installed would be helpful as well. It's possible to manage without but you'll need to remove the rear underbody panels to allow access to the air suspension valve block and manually bleed the system from there. If you have access to ISTA+ there'll be less dismantling to do. Apologies for all the nerdy computer shots. I thought they might be helpful as I'd not been able to find much online showing how to use ISTA to empty/refill the sysyem. I had to buy a decent trolley jack and axle stands for the job but considering the indy garage were saying they'd need 2 hours to properly diagnose the car before making any repairs the jack and stands have almost paid for themselves already. I took a slight gamble just changing the spring without any diagnosis other than how the car was behaving.but as one spring had already been done and the car was showing 75000 miles it seemed like a reasonable bet. In the end it paid off and I'm glad to have invested in some quality equipment. To start with I connected a battery charger at the terminals under the bonnet. It wasn't the same power supply you'd find in a properly equipped workshop and only puts a slow charge into a AGM battery but knowing I was going to leave the ignition on for a while it seemed better than nothing. I also switched off everything else I could to minimise as much battery drain as possible. Next I slackened off the wheel nuts just enough to make it easier to undo them once the car was off the ground. I was only changing the spring on one side so only needed to remove one wheel but as I was fully deflating the air suspension I needed to support the rear of the car on both sides. Being an F11 I was able to use the stiffening plate behind the rear subframe as a lifting point. It looks flimsy but the supporting struts give it enough strength to hold the weight of the car. Just be sure to chock the front wheels securely as the car will have a tendency to roll forward. Once lifted high enough the car was supported on axle stands combined with rubber jack pads which fit into the jacking points. Next I used ISTA+ to fully deflate the air suspension system. After connecting the cable and establishing a connection to the car I selected the 'service functions' tab and navigated through to the option of filling and draining the air suspension. I selected the option to bleed the air bellows Then confirmed all the necessary preconditions had been met... You need to remove the 40 amp air compressor fuse which is found in the boot inside the trim behind the right hand wheel arch and numbered 182. Then clicked to confirm the bleeding procedure and then continue While the air was bleeding out I removed the wheel nuts and wheel after noting the position of the wheel on the hub. I'm not sure whether it's considered best to replace the wheel in the same position but it seemed there'd a better chance of getting it to sit flush with the hub and avoid any vibration issues later so I took a second to photograph the wheel before removing it. By this time ISTA had finished the first run through the bleeding process and was asking my if I wanted to repeat. I selected yes and clicked through the same screens as before. With the wheel now removed after the second run through I was able to feel how much pressure was left in the suspension system by pressing on the rubber bellows. It felt very soft and was easy to push into with my fingers so I guessed 2 bleeding procedures would be enough and declined ISTAs offer to repeat. The spring is secured at the bottom by three plastic tabs which engage with the the hole in the middle of the mounting. I used a suitably sized flat bladed screwdriver to push them toward the centre and so disengage them from the edge of the hole. At first I tried to unclip all three before lifting the bottom of the spring clear but I soon realised it was much easier to unclip one and twist the lower body of the spring slightly so as to prevent the first tab from re engaging while you're trying to free off the second. While holding the body of the spring in its twisted position I could then disengage a second tab. With two tabs now clear it was then easy to twist the bottom of the spring a little more in the right direction to clear the final tab leaving the spring hanging free at the bottom and clear of the mounting. To disengage the top mounting I had to turn the spring by about 45 degrees in a clockwise direction, that is clockwise if you were looking down at the top of the spring. If you look at the shape of the top of your new spring it should be clear which way you need to turn the old one. It wasn't difficult to turn, I just gripped the bellows and dust cover in both hands and the whole assembly turned quite easily. Once turned it felt quite loose and it seemed to be disengaged but was still tricky to pull down and get clear of the mounting. After trying for a few minutes and getting frustrated I stopped, looked at the spring, swore at it and tried again. This time I must've moved it in just the right way and it dropped out easily, as if mocking my previous attempts. Don't panic if it seems reluctant to come out at first. You'll soon move it just where it needs to be to pull free and you'll be left with... Take care not to twist the air line too much or it'll get kinked and need replaced or repaired using a hot coat hanger which was one method I recall reading someone had used. Next I had to undo the fitting attaching the air line to the spring using a 10mm ring spanner. . It wasn't screwed in particularly tightly and was easy to unscrew With the air line removed from the spring I pulled the threaded part of the fitting from the end after prising off the olive which grips the pipe and had a look to assess the condition of the pipe. NewTIS says the pipe needs to be in pristine condition to to ensure a good seal. Mine was not in pristine condition having score marks round the circumference presumably from the unscrewing of the fitting. I could have cut the pipe back to a clean section but would have needed to cut off almost an inch. I didn't want to leave the pipe too short or risk not making a straight cut which might not seal properly so decided to take a chance and just refit the pipe as it was. I put some tape over the open end in an effort to keep any foreign particles from entering the system. The bare air line was then able to be pulled through the hole in the dust cover and moved to one side out of the way. All that was left was to manoeuvre the spring clear of the car. This turned out to be the most difficult part of the whole job but after some perseverance I realised I had to separate the dust cover from the spring. Once I'd done that it was easy to bend the dust cover enough to pull clear and then I was able to pull the spring out from the car and give it a good inspection. It was interesting to get a good look at it. It hadn't looked too bad while on the car but now it was off and fully deflated I could see the true condition of the rubber and some of the strange symptoms resulting from failing air springs made a lot more sense. The car might drop one day but not the next. It all depends where the rubber folds. Original BMW unit with dust cover removed and Arnott replacement side by side. The Arnott one looks quite a bit smaller and came with the the new pipe fitting already in place. There was a plastic plug sealing the fitting which you need to leave in place until just before fitting the air line. I'm not sure whether you're supposed to get a new dust cover with a new spring. Mine didn't come with one but the old one looked ok and seemed to be a good fit with the Arnott spring, notwithstanding the following, so I just swapped it over. The only difficulty I had here came from the shape of the recess at the top of the Arnott spring through which the air line passes. It's a little different to the BMW unit, I guess in an effort to make it harder to trap the air line between the top of the spring and the car but makes it difficult to get a good alignment with the hole in the BMW dust cover. The hole needs to be a little lower down. Perhaps there are some specific Arnott dust covers to use with their springs. I'll look into that sometime but for now I had to get the car back together without any further delay so just had to go with what I had. I positioned the dust cover so the airline could pass through and line up as closely as possible with the connection, removed the tape I'd previously used and the plastic plug in the air inlet and pushed the air line in until it stopped. I then pulled it out gently to seal the olive as per Arnotts instructions. Re assembly is, in classic Haynes style, the reversal of the removal procedure. Offer up the top mount of the spring into its mounting hole and rotate to engage. Take car not to trap the air line at the top of the spring or you'll end up with fault codes and need to take the lot to bits again. Mine felt quite loose just hanging there but when turned seemed to be engaging positively so I was confident it was in the right place and went on to attach the bottom mount. It was difficult to pull the bottom of the spring down with enough force to engage the tabs in the hole so after a bit of trial and error I decided I'd just get it in position, try re inflating the system and see whether air pressure would do the hard work for me. I replaced the air compressor fuse and after clicking to continue I heard the compressor start working and soon after that the bellows was hard and the bottom mount was pushed fully home with tabs engaged. Referring to the photo taken earlier I replaced the wheel after giving the mating surfaces a good brush off with a wire brush and let the car back down onto the ground. It sat there, not dropping. So far so good. Torqued the wheel nuts to 140Nm, removed laptop and battery charger, put tools away and went for a drive. The Arnott spring felt much nicer that the BMW one. I'm not sure whether the ride quality degrades over time/miles or whether Arnott units are just better from the start but it's a great improvement. The car rides a lot better and the symptoms the car was displaying are no longer evident so I'm pretty happy at having done the job myself. If anyone's thinking of doing this and being put off by thought of it being too difficult... Don't think that way. As long as you don't mid getting some dirt on your hands and have the tools needed it's really very easy and will save you plenty of money for an hour or so of your time.
  6. 11 points
    got his 540 last year and over the year done a fair bit to it, first was have gearbox sorted so was fitted with on from an alpina with ecu, then i got double glazing fitted, i already had my wheels, bumper and mirrors off previous car, fitted full airlift air ride, sorted all new arms out on it, and then with this lockdown i managed to refurb the wheels andredye all my rare leather parts i got a couple years ago, everything was champagne anyhow but the seats and armrests bt redyed so it all matched, seats are e38 sport contours, which i then added heated elements and active massage too, welded the brackets i chopped off some e38 comfort that had tables so these could be fitted, modified e38 arm rest on tilt and slide with phone connection, im still working on the phone, it had a v50 and ive converted to bluetooth, just waiting on an aerial to test it out now, pretty chuffed hw its turned out, next is quad exhaust as ive modded the spare wheel well to accept another pipe, then paint to make it mint as couple of little rust spots to sort, modified e39 handles using genuine e38 fiber optic for external illumination, e38 inter illuminated handles, custom trims with individual badges, and some individual kick plates i had for god knows how long heres some pics enjoy
  7. 11 points
    A few months ago I upgraded to one of the Chinese Android units widely available on Ebay and AliExpress, and they are a great upgrade, but..... One Little Problem: Our E60/E61's were never designed to have a touch screen. They were designed with a display screen, at a display distance. So anyone that has one of these units will confirm that it's a bit of a stretch to actually touch our touchscreens comfortably without having to lean forward from the driving position. Picture grabbed from google (I always forget to take a "before" pic) The Chinese designers of these units have made the same hardware fit into many different models, and they just looked at what already existed in the car, and designed their touchscreen into it. They could have done a much better job by designing a mount that is actually within reach, like for the F10.... It's the same head-unit with a different fascia. So..... The Solution: Design it yourself. Create a rough template to use as a guide for a perspex fascia. Once you remove the stock plastic fascia you reveal a glossy black border that was previously covered. Test fitting here above. Having somewhere to rest your hand also keeps things user-friendly. The resulting cutout fascia before spraying. The screw holes match up with the metal case of the head-unit. What looks like an ugly scratch/break on the left is actually a rough recess on the back side, milled out with a dremel to house the microSD pcb so it would not be set too deep. Mic hole also on left. The Result: This pic above shows my eye-line view. The reflection I get to see is the passenger seat and door below the window line. This solves a slight problem with these units also, in that the reflected view originally was higher, looking a bit at the window which is always brighter. With the final pic I will mention mounting. I had intended to use the two original mounting holes and design a plastic mount that the new fascia could clip into. However during test fittings it became obvious that it's a tight squeeze putting it where it is. As such I've decided to leave it as is, basically tightly wedged in. It does not budge and the screen is not being compressed, only the perspex and metal casing at the back. The original fascia is vented at the top. The gap in the pic above cannot be seen unless you get down low to look for it, and it leaves a vent in case it's needed, so will be staying as is. For the surface finish I considered a black glossy perspex or a wrap. What I ended up using was a cheap rattle spray can of satin black and I'm delighted how it turned out. It matches so much of the dash surfaces and just looks very professional. Overall this job was done over most of a Saturday afternoon. Hopefully it inspires others to do similar (or better) Keliuss
  8. 11 points
    Collected the car this morning; alloys fully refurbed and powdercoated. Finish is Platinum Silver New centre caps; Richbrook stainless steel valves & an 82mm Mtec stud conversion fitted with 5mm hubcentric shims upfront and 12mm hubcentric spacers on the rears. Gives the alloys a much better stance IMO
  9. 11 points
    pauliexjr

    Proud to be British!

    If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in Delta Airlines 2 years ago, you would have £49.00 today. If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in AIG insurance company 2 years ago, you would have £33.00 today. If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in Lehman Brothers 6 years ago, you would have nothing today. If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in Northern Rock 5 years ago, you would have nothing today But, if you had purchased £1,000 worth of beer one year ago at Tesco's, drunk all the beer, then taken the aluminum cans to the scrap metal dealer, you would have received £214.00. Based on the above, the best current investment plan is to drink heavily & recycle. A recent study found that the average Briton walks about 900 miles a year. Another study found that Britons drink, on average, 22 gallons of alcohol a year. That means that, on average, Britons get about 41 miles to the gallon! Makes you proud to be British!
  10. 11 points
    Nomis

    Manchester Arena blast reports

    I'm sorry but I just don't buy into this good triumphing over evil crap that pours out of the media after things like this. The people that jumped in to help out were great and did the right thing. I'd like to think all us right minded people would do the same. But, try telling one of the 19 victims families that good has triumphed over evil because they got a lot of love and a free taxi ride home and I bet they don't see it the same way. As a father myself the only emotion I have is utter hatred and contempt for bastards like those that would deliberately target a venue packed full of children. The evil bomber won. Simple as that. Sorry if I offend anybody.
  11. 11 points
    RichardP

    My E26!

    As many of you will know, it’s BMW’s 100th anniversary this year. To celebrate it, last week end they held a festival which included inviting 1000 cars from various clubs, nominally 10 from each club, for display in the Munich Olympic Park which is just the other side of the road from BMW Welt. I was invited in the M1, so a road trip was on! To protect the front end paintwork I hastily applied some Xpel Tracwrap the night before leaving. Not a very good job, I nick named it Crapwrap, but it would serve the purpose and was to be removed after the trip anyway. IMG_1014a The trip began early on the morning of 7th September, odometer reading 1,705 miles, leaving home in Yorkshire. IMG_1016a IMG_1017a Exactly 4 hours and 241 miles later, I collected a friend in Surrey to share the driving, followed by a quick stop at Munich Legends to say hello as we were passing and have a bit of lunch. They had two other M1’s, their own and the BMW UK car. M1 spot count, 3. IMG_1021 PIC_0649 From there on to the tunnel, slightly concerned about the reported problems, but there were no problems at all. PIC_0657 An evening blast down the almost deserted A26 saw us arrive at Reims to stay the night. Odometer now at 2230, so 525 miles in the day. Brilliant blue sky on the Thursday morning at 8:45 in Reims, the precursor to a very hot day. IMG_1029 More empty French AutoRoute on the A4 to Metz PIC_0665 We weren’t speeding officer, no, really we weren’t! IMG_1035 Then down to Strasbourg to pick up the A35 briefly before crossing the Rhine on the 500 to enter Germany, still not a cloud in the sky and temperatures nudging into the 30’s. PIC_0681 Pushing on up the 5 to Karlsruhe and starting to see what a 36 year old car makes of coming home to the derestricted Autobahn PIC_0685 On to the 8 and past Pforzheim to Stuttgart and Munich PIC_0689 The Germans get 100 Octane V-Power Racing, not cheap though! IMG_1092 Pushing on a little more on the final derestricted run into Munich PIC_0699 Due to the navigator (me!) going entering just ‘Munich’ in the sat nav and not the hotel, we took the circuitous route, right through the middle of the city. PIC_0706 PIC_0708 PIC_0714 Realising our (my) mistake, we then drove out towards the hotel just south of the Olympic Park PIC_0716 Finally getting into the hotel underground car park by about 6:30pm. IMG_1038 The odometer now reading 2668, 963 miles in two days. Turned up at the Olympic park on the Friday just before 9:00 to find 2 other M1s had already arrived PIC_0735 DSC_5897 M1 count, 5. As the day went on, more cars arrived, everyone had been given a slot to reduce queuing. A few Z8’s were quite early DSC_5898 Including a several Alpinas IMG_1045 By Saturday there were well over 20. A definitely used, but beautiful 507 DSC_5899 DSC_5900 PIC_0741 PIC_0747 PIC_0743 The co-driver, a big Alpina fan, was beside himself when he spotted this 8 series B12 5.7, number 057, the last one made, complete with carbon fibre bonnet and de-badged DSC_5907 PIC_0754 Including the intriguing manual box without a clutch pedal IMG_1042 DSC_5912 PIC_0757 PIC_0758 PIC_0759 With an E92 Alpina GT3 on one side DSC_5908 And a rare Glas Coupe arrived and parked on the other side, it sounded great DSC_5910 And a couple of other Glas cars were doted around DSC_5941 DSC_5926 DSC_5927 All sorts of other old and rare BMWs were rolling up DSC_5933 DSC_5934 A lovely 327 DSC_5938 A rare E28 Touring DSC_5930 And a stunning E34 M5 Touring DSC_5937 The 8 series were out in force DSC_5932 So were the Isettas DSC_5924a Including this one complete with period ski set! DSC_5920 And a 2 door (one at the front and one side door) DSC_5921 Motor bikes were included, although there weren’t anything like as many as there were cars PIC_0797 There was a Dixi too DSC_5939 There were also rows of Z1’s and Z3’s. By the time we returned to the car, another 3 M1’s had arrived DSC_5936 DSC_5935 M1 count, 8. There was also a Black M1 belonging to the owner of Mint Classics in Munster who specialise in selling M1’s, taking the count to 9. On Friday afternoon we had a factory tour, interesting but no photos allowed. They make the 3 and 4 series, M4 and M4 GTS. By the time we got to the engine plant work had stopped, they produce the modular 3 and 4 cylinder engines and the older N20 4 cylinder engine. A tour of the new BMW Classic facility had been laid on for both Friday evening and Saturday afternoon. Friday was for ‘overseas’ and Saturday for ‘locals’. As I’d been put in with the German M1 club we had passes for the Saturday, but we blagged our way into the Friday session! Visiting the Classic facility in the original factory, which BMW had to buy back, was amazing. There were loads of cars that you’ve maybe heard about or seen articles on but somehow don’t believe actually exist. The BMW Turbo, one of 2, the other was in the BMW museum IMG_1052 IMG_1075 The 1940 328 Kamm Coupe Mille Miglia IMG_1067 And the 2006 Homage IMG_1053 A ‘standard’ 328 IMG_1072 And the 2011 Homage IMG_1071 A mint yellow 507 IMG_1068 CSL Art Car IMG_1069 2002 GT4 IMG_1065 M1 ProCar (there was another and 3 road going M1’s) and some original Minis (not really in the right place IMO!) IMG_1059 M1 count now 14. Prototype E65/66 7 series extra-long wheel base L7, they only made an E38 L7. IMG_1070 The bonkers ‘goldfish’ with V16 engine that’s so big the radiators had to be put in the boot, feed with air via two large scoops in the rear wings IMG_1064 Loads of other nutty concepts too, no M8 or E39 M5 touring though. Also visible were the Classis work shops where they do work on their collection and restore customer cars (for a considerable fee!). There were several cars at various states of repair, including a 507, another road going M1 and the Piquet ProCar with the map of the Nurburgring on (supposedly done as a joke so Piquet and Stuck would not get lost!) IMG_1073 IMG_1074 M1 count, 16. Food and a presentation were laid on, but we skipped that as we got talking to ‘Dr Ralph’ outside about various nerdy details! A few other cars turned up on Saturday, such as this E46 M3 GTR look alike and E93 M3 GTS. IMG_1086 A quick walk round BMW Welt resulted in another ProCar, again driven by Piquet, this time in Marlborough livery on a ‘grid’ of other racers DSC_5942 M1 count, 17. There was also another area for cars near the BMW museum, amongst others an M4 GTS DSC_5956 And a gaggle of 1Ms DSC_5958 DSC_5959 The BMW museum itself contained lots of interesting stuff, the second Turbo which looked to be in much worse condition than the other DSC_5947 Yet another 507 DSC_5945 The GINA Visionary concept with flexible fabric body DSC_5948 And the Vision concept DSC_5950 Lots of engines, including this intriguing version of the M10 4 cylinder engine DSC_5951 And the final M1 spot of the week end, taking the total to 18. DSC_5953 On the Friday evening there was a concert during which cars from various decades were driven on stage, together with photos and video on the big screens. Strangely, the 40’s didn’t get much screen time! For the 60’s they drove Elvis Presley’s white 507 on stage which has been restored to ‘as new’ from a total wreck by BMW Classic. Difficult to take pictures as it was dark, but here is a panorama before the stadium filled up, it’s only the 180 degrees in front, the back seats were not used and it was over half an hour to the start IMG_1087 And one during the concert IMG_1089 The screens were massive, the central one having a moving section that went up and down depending on the act performing, there was some truly amazing ‘Break Dancing’, classical music, some German performers and Simply Red. Most of the dialog was in German so was lost on me. We escaped just before the end to avoid the crush. The return journey was pretty much the reverse of the outward one. Getting onto the autobahn early on a Sunday has its advantages PIC_0850a Traveling at this speed felt effortless with plenty of power in reserve and absolutely rock solid on the road, but I did not want to push too hard as the wheels are Magnesium which weakens with age. Another beautiful sky on the quiet French toll roads PIC_0861 The tunnel was quite quiet, although this was the Flexi Plus lane as I did not know what time we’d be arriving in Calais so forked out the additional cost so we could get any return train. IMG_1120 Again, no problem with the tunnel, no sign of anything either, but I’d feel a bit apprehensive getting to it in the dark. Finally the car was left at Munich Legends for some work on the suspension and a few other bits, but that’s a different story. Everything on the car worked flawlessly, with the one exception of the fan for the air conditioning. The A/C cooling worked fine, but the secondary ventilation fan sounds like it’s got something stuck inside and occasionally stopped blowing. Switching the A/C off for a few minutes and then back on cured the problem for a while before it came back again. Final odometer reading, 3416, a total of 1711 miles. IMG_1148 We drove for a little over 30 hours and consumed 286.57 Litres of Supper Unleaded over the 1559 miles between fill ups, that’s an average of 24.73 mpg. Given the age and performance of the car, together with the fact that we were cruising at 80-90 mph in France, giving it some welly on the exit from the toll booths and doing 100+ in Germany on most of the derestricted bits, I think that’s quite incredible. An amazing car, amazing trip and memories to last a lifetime. Many thanks to my friend for making the trip so enjoyable too!
  12. 11 points
    Sandip

    Donuts funeral

    Donuts funeral will be held on Tuesday the 22nd March at 9:30am followed by a reception in a venue close to the Crematorium. Please contact Donuts brother, lildonut, for more information if you would like to attend. The forum have organised one wreath, BMW5, which has been agreed with the family on behalf of all the members and the legacy he leaves behind.
  13. 10 points
    sharkfan

    The BMW5 random picture thread

    Barge-tastic
  14. 10 points
    pauliexjr

    Winter advice from the AA....

    The AA have warned that due to the extreme weather conditions if traveling it is advisable to take the following: A fully charged mobile phone Sunglasses. Personal medication. First aid kit. A road atlas – in case of diversions. Sat-nav or a printed route for an unfamiliar journey. A blanket, rug or sleeping bag. Shovel. Ice scraper and de-icer. Torch and batteries. Snacks – chocolate or cereal bars. A warm winter coat, scarf, hat, gloves and warm clothes. Waterproofs. Sturdy footwear. A flask of hot drink. I felt a complete twat getting on the bus!
  15. 10 points
    mike.

    What did you do to your E60/61 today?

    not today but on Saturday gave the car a clean, nice bit of snow foam, 2 bucket method wash and put it in the garage + hoovered the interior. In antisipation of the nice weather on Sunday I thought I'd treat it to a coat of show wax (only lasts a month but the gloss is worth it) gave the wheels a polish with AG super resin polish and applied Sonax wheel sealant to them. it's dirty again now but was worth it for this picture on Sunday
  16. 10 points
    Thanks for your support. It's a free site run by volunteers sadly we lost the site owner and thus the full access to the software. We are trying to get it sorted along with the family though of course they really don't have too. I'm thankful that we've been able to keep it going at all but hey.... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  17. 10 points
  18. 10 points
    dan101smith

    Wrapped My Touring.....

    Good job you quoted all the pictures for your one word response.
  19. 9 points
    RichardP

    E34 M5 Touring restoration

    Collected from Munich Legends a couple of weeks ago As the car is now back home and I can now get to work on really cleaning it up. I've had a bit of a go at the interior, still work in progress, I'll just leave these here for now. I'll post some more pictures later.
  20. 9 points
    I'm bumping this thread as that was what Dave would have wanted, in order to once again raise awareness about Bowel Cancer. https://forum.bmw5.co.uk/topic/137511-superdave-rip/?tab=comments#comment-1475719 Sadly Dave lasted until April 2019 before succumbing to this Cancer. I know he filled that last year of his life with every day devoted to making the most of his time for himself and his young family. He made memories, had fun, undertook adventures, spent every last minute (except for occasional posts on here) making the most of life - as we all perhaps should. Anyway, Dave has passed away but please take a minute to read the first post of this thread and if you are in any doubt for heavens sake get yourself checked out. Dave Andrews, rest in peace my friend.
  21. 9 points
    sharkfan

    SuperDave RIP

    Dave and I became good friends during 4 years I lived near Chester. He spotted my car at our daughters school and posted on this forum about it and it turned out his younger daughter and my daughter were in the same class together. We spent some excellent times with our families and friends together, and made some excellent memories, as well as having some great fun. He broke the news of his diagnosis a while ago and was quite clear about his chances. I could only urge him to spend whatever time he had in making memories to last for a lifetime for his lovely wife and two beautiful daughters; I believe he had already decided upon that and acted upon that up to his last days. I will miss him, his enthusiasm for this forum and BMW 5's, and the world is a slightly poorer place for having a such a kind, generous, enthusiastic and humorous man taken away at such a young age.
  22. 9 points
    pauliexjr

    Oh the irony!

  23. 9 points
  24. 9 points
    RichardP

    My E26!

    I was at Gaydon yesterday for the BMW Car Club festival, and took part in the concourse on Saturday. Staying up until 9:30pm until it got dark, and then getting up again at 4:30am just as it was getting light to finish prepping the car payed off. On another note, I'd noticed that my car was missing two parts in the engine bay. Looking at other cars, there are shaped plastic uprights that fasten on to two bosses on the main chassis. They fit into the buttresses on the engine bay cover, presumably to change the airflow in some way. There appear to be at least two versions, you can see them on either side in these two pictures, above the expansion tank and dip stick. Early version from chassis number 4301013 Later version from chassis number 4301108 Most cars seem to have these parts. They attach by 2 bolts to the boss on the chassis. However, not only was I missing the parts, but there are no holes in the boss to fit the bolts to! Appologies for the back focused picture The parts are NLA from BMW and they are not just a flat plate, they have a hoop on which goes round the tubular chassis member. So, I borrowed a pair from another M1 owner had them digitised and 3D printed Using the highest quality printer and mode, these took over 20 hours each to print. The finish is not identical as the originals are moulded, but they are not bad. I also noticed that some cars had the top edge wrapped in a trim strip and others did not. The variations may all just be due to the way the Italian assembly operators felt on the day, the availability of parts, of that bits have fallen off or been removed at some point over the last 37 years, who knows. As the parts only arrived last Friday, I temporarily attached them with double sided foam tape.
  25. 9 points
    jake13

    What did you do to your E60/61 today?

    Mine's debadged


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