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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/14/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    sharkfan

    Coronavirus/Covid19

    Well the level of illogical thought by the Government has been laid bare with the announcement that face masks will become mandatory with enforcement by fines from the 24th July. This is apparently because the 'science' behind the wearing of masks has changed. I have a few questions about this though... 1. If you're agreeing the science has changed and the masks are now necessary then why isn't it happening tomorrow instead of in 10 days time? 2. If you're insisting on and agreeing with masks in shops then why aren't you insisting on masks in arguably higher risk areas such as pubs, restaurants, gyms, any offices, government departments, on football pitches, any sporting events whatsoever, narrow streets, corridors, any gatherings of non family home members, in fact just about anywhere that isn't your own home and garden? 3. If you are making it mandatory for people going into shops to wear masks why has a Government Minister just stated on the BBC Breakfast program that shop staff will NOT have to wear masks? Can any proponents of mask wearing in shops from 10 days time explain the logic to me as it appears desperately ill thought through with little or no regard to the science behind breathing and Covid 19 transmission.
  2. 2 points
    FLX

    '05 E60 530d Manual - Underside refresh

    I weighed up where to go from the broken spring. I considered just getting replacements, then thought the shocks are probably past their best. I had planned further down the line after other maintenance to lower it just a little more but it didn't make sense to hold off any longer. I was very tempted by Koni sports but I wanted to have a bit of height adjustment so I settled on a set of KW street comfort coilovers. I've had cheap coilovers in the past that I wasn't too impressed with, I wanted to see if the higher end ones would suit me better. It had wear on the outer edges of the tyres when I got it too. I decided not to mess about and got new Lemforder arms and tie rods for the front end. Probably should have got new inner tie rods too with the time it took unseizing them from the outers, obviously hadn't been tracked in a while. On stripping the front shocks I found the top mounts were rather rough, most likely a culprit in the broken springs. Yep, plural now! The other side had an older break near the end that wasn't obvious. Cleaned up the hubs, some corrosion on the other side but I'm happy to leave them unfinished, it's an easy replaced part. Around this time I also noticed the front hard brake lines weren't going to pass another MOT. I got the rear end up and found the same issue, along with corrosion setting in to the floor above the subframe. Thanks to someone at BMW, the brake lines are split into sections on the E60 so it's a lot easier to just replace the rotten bits. I've yet to fully check the lines around the fire wall behind the engine but they're looking OK from what I can see. I thought no way am I getting this far in to not address the rust on the floor, it's going to bug the sh*t out of me. I removed the exhaust, all the under trays and the complete subframe, I'm going to take the tank, sill covers and rear bumper off to get it all at once. Clean up and underseal is the plan. It's a load of work for an old diesel but now I can apply what I've learned and hopefully get more life out of the chassis. I would love an actual car lift inside a garage but this will have to do! The subframe came out without much issue, snapped one of the M6 bolts on the parking brake cable holder but I expected both to shear so that was a small win. I think I will replace the diff and subframe bushes while it's down, undecided on OEM or poly bushes though. The rear suspension could wait until later but I'd quite like to experience the car with a full suspension refresh. I'll paint the diff and drive shaft. The anti roll bars and calipers are off for powder coating along with some brackets. This is about as bad as the under side is from what I've seen so far, obviously to ignore it just now isn't going to end well with the salt we get here. A side note: I think I would genuinely love to live somewhere where corrosion isn't as big an issue as it is here. Japan seems very intriguing! Passenger side rear underneath: Drivers side rear - That's one dodgy looking brake line! I had the recall done for the battery cable done in January so I'm happy to re-use the pass through if it comes apart without breaking. I went to remove the battery and found a fair bit of water around it. I had checked the boot floor previously and it was dry, it was pretty obvious where the water had found its way in to the battery compartment though. I've not looked in to this further yet, I'll get a better look when the bumper is off. I removed the front arch liners to get better access to the brake lines and assess if theres any more needing done there too - yep. Maybe I should stop taking things apart Just a bit of corrosion near the bottoms of the scuttle trays. You can also see where the brake lines were exposed. I was amused with how bare the front seemed without the liners in place, the aluminium front end is an interesting concept and looks well executed. I do wonder how it will fare given the nature of galvanic corrosion, time will tell. Drivers side front - corrosion around the scuttle drain: Passenger side front - same again on the scuttle drain but not as bad. You can see the OEM front brake line joiner, the rears just in the bottom right coming from underneath the car. I will replace the exposed unions with stainless ones. The joiners are hidden behind covers and I'm confident they'll last fine. Also not visible is an oil leak down the engine on this side. I'm going to pull the intake to clean out and possibly remove the swirl flaps so I should be able so source it then. Another potential problem just visible in the last pic, this hose has been rubbing on the intercooler pipe for a while by the looks of it. So aside from all that! I've a few issues to trace/fix: - Parking sensors. I do OK without them but they're on the car, I want them to work. - Washer pressure is poor. I'll clean the pump while I have the liner out. - Around 60mph theres a small rattle from the dash. I'll probably have more rattles with the coilovers so this is a low priority. - Fobs need to be really close to work. I'll start with a battery in them but suspect the diversity aerial may have been damaged with the moisture from the rear window seal. - Dent in the boot lid. Not high on the list but it will get done. - Parcel shelf discoloured, it shouldn't be blue. Had it on my E46 and it looked much fresher with a paint so I will likely do the same here. - Dead pixels on the iDrive screen. I would like bluetooth and/or AUX so this will probably get addressed eventually.
  3. 1 point
    waitee

    Rebuilding my 540i... join me :)

    Hey guys/gals, started this thread as I feel like sharing my project with you all, Always nice to share and no doubt I will get some tips on the way to as well as give some. The car: e39 540i in TopazBlue. bought cheap (2k), didn't drive very well, but engine and gearbox felt Smooth and powerful and chassis showed to signs of rust. If you go through this thread, you will find in no particular order some help with pics on fully restoring and slightly upgrading the car: Brakes, refurbed callipers, new discs pads and braided brake lines Fully polly-bushed car including Subframe and diff bushings New suspension, eibach springs and OEM Sachs sport shocks with top mounts Every last drop of oil changed, gearbox, diff, engine, power steering Wheel bearings changed Full coolant flush and sensor change Yaw sensor replacement General service, plugs, filters etc.. Fixing minor oil leaks from around the engine including rocker cover gaskets and refurb, vanos seals and sump gasket Fitting 18" 8jF and 9jR style 32's Upgrading and modernising the stereo and Nav with discrete sub M bumpers and exhaust back box delete Interior refresh/upgrade, and fixing side bolsters the best way! Wiring angel eyes to be DRLs Intake system overhaul Driveshaft squib and centre bearing, engine and trans mounts Fixing rattly doors, getting a good closing thud Belts, pulley bearing and tensioner overhaul Prop shaft centre bearing, guibo and CV replacement And more.. As I go ill upload pics of what im doing, any helpful comments welcome and ideas to This is the car as I bought it. Cheers
  4. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    With the long winter nights well and truly upon us and with a bit of free time, I've decided to finally do a full thread on how I completed a rear full sill repair on my e34. I've had communication with various members looking for advice and I know there are a few forthcoming repair/restorations imminent. The purpose of this thread is to primarily help those about to go through such a task. With even the last e34's now approaching 25yrs old the one issue that dominates longevity is unfortunately corrosion. Although superbly designed, the e34 does still have areas that are vulnerable to rust with the sills, especially the rear, high on the list of common areas. Bearing in mind that the e34 5 series was possibly the last BMW to be built to traditional methods, it's the sills that contribute to the core strength of the chassis. I will say that although I can weld, I'm not a fully fledged 'body man' so to speak. My method of repair may be considered long winded, but it did ensure all traces of corrosion were eradicated. Here's a shot of the car just prior to the repair commencing. Not bad looking you might think.... So here goes... 2015 During the annual MOT the previous year the tester had remarked 'I'll give it to you this time, but next year, no chance!' in regards to the rear sills. So early in the summer I began to assemble what I thought I would require to complete the job, namely a pair of klokkerholm repair sills and some mild sheet steel. By mid summer I started on the car, naively estimating completion within 6-8wks...... As can be seen, the corrosion is obviously well established. Time to start cutting.... The first of well over a hundred spot welds to be drilled out. The real truth...... In the words of my friend on here Geoff (dongiov) when he had a similar experience...Ewww I knew it had rust, but at this level? To cut a long story short I spent the next few weeks attempting to make up a few repair sections but imo I failed. Towards the autumn I parked the car and began to ponder what to do with it. I realised early on that the klokkerholm sill panels whilst excellent in quality were not going to be suitable to complete the repair. Also it was clear the inner sills were rotten as well as the floor pan adjacent to the rear seat heel board. Great. Not only that! After a thorough inspection of the complete car, i finally realised that all four corners had serious corrosion at and around the jacking points, the wing bottoms had also rotted out, as well as a few areas needing attention. Devastated was an understatement. I parked the car up and abandoned it..... 2016 Not a great deal happened during the year. With a major house project and a child off to uni, it didn't leave much time or money for messing about with old BMW's, 2016 was in effect a wash out. It was the closest I came to giving up and scrapping it. But after 14yrs ownership I just couldn't quite bring myself to do that. The real work would began 2017. I don't particularly like the cold so from early November to late Feb it's rare to find me doing my own stuff unless strictly necessary. Although I have a double garage with ample hard standing at home, I wasn't in a position to do the work there. My place of employment was used instead but that meant the car had to be parked outside everytime I worked on it mostly during the evenings. Taking it in and out each time was a royal pita though. Would have been completed much faster otherwise. All comments are welcome. Look out for the next instalment in this mission soon.
  5. 1 point
    Thats all true flandy but wheres the S38? When you wind a nice one up the noise and power delivery! Plus it will still not be an M5 but a bitsa car
  6. 1 point
    JasonH

    535D fluctuating RPM while driving

    Oh your gearbox figures tell me that your gearbox is in excellent condition.
  7. 1 point
    roundy

    Alloy wheel protector

    As oilburner says, or maybe a little claybaring to remove any residue.
  8. 1 point
    Piper

    Double glazing

    5m of Butyl is only £7 in eBay. I also stuck waterproof tape along the bottom of my membrane once reinstalled. Just an extra precaution.
  9. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    @Keliuss Thanks for your interest. One of my primary objectives was to document the process so that others may benefit. It is my view that your typical Northern European e34 with moderate mileage will more than likely be harbouring some corrosion so it's an issue that will become more prevalent as time passes by. I will do a full rundown of all products that I used throughout the job. Most of it is easily available and not too dear to purchase either. As previously promised, I will give my thoughts and views on the pros & cons on the roof drain situation. I did very similar to what was shown in your link by extending the drain tubes, though I wasn't convinced to have the exit outside of the body panel.
  10. 1 point
    andycstokes

    Alloy wheel protector

    That's just the adhesive residue and remains of the foam. To remove, just ordinary white spsit will do it. Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
  11. 1 point
    Oilburner

    Alloy wheel protector

    I would try using some isopropyl alcohol to see if that softens and dissolves the adhesive, isopropyl alcohol should not damage the wheel finish apart from stripping any wax coating, you may have applied to the wheels for protection.
  12. 1 point
    Nah; it goes to the bottom and stops. Because it's solid, you can't force it any further etc
  13. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    So. Into the final furlong .. With the front end sill repairs done it was time to go back to the rear sills to complete. The inner sill join... Which was tidied up and sealed. A couple of days later, it was time to fit the outer panel. This was the area I most feared for getting it wrong since any major mistake would be visible.. After trimming off the excess, the outer panel was placed into position and marked.. Then clamped firmly into position... ...and then cut through both panels on the overlap with a 1mm cutting disc to leave this.. pretty much the ideal gap for welding. With the general dimensions in place, the panel was taken back off the car and marked for drilling. I tried and tried to get hold of a spot welder to give that professional look. But unfortunately it was not to be. Moving back to the car, the inner sill area was cleaned off and tidied. All excess weld and other detritus was removed. BH S80 liberally applied.... Outer sill drilled for plug welds and zinc primed..... I've said it before but the OEM BMW sill panel really is a quality item. After allowing the zinc coat to dry the panel was tacked into position ....and the door briefly refitted to check alignment and gaps.. ....and welded. Very slow and patient to avoid distortion. And the money shot.... all welds were cleaned off, again slowly. You can still distort with too much heat during the cleaning off process. However, the key difference here is the location of the lifting pad. Structural rigidity now completely restored. A view along the sill. I was happy with the outcome. All completed on this side. Just a skim of filler and paint required to finish the task. Next visit will land us back to where we started, the o/s rear corner, which was as usual turned out much more involved in the end More soon.
  14. 1 point
    waitee

    Rebuilding my 540i... join me :)

    Hello again to all of the 3 folk following my rebuild Amazing day today, LONG day under the car: Diff oil Auto box Oil/filter Engine oil/filter 5w40 seems less noisy now which is nice. Fixed broken filter mount, bit of DIY with some rubber grommets I had lying around. Drained the power steering, replaced the reservoir and filter with a new unit. Secured loads of bits in the engine that where loose. K&N air filter (Bonus find on the car) washed as it was manky! and re oiled. cabin filters. And I spend hours cleaning the underside of the car and engine bay of 20 years worth of oil. So much oil under the car, of course I have a leak to fix. Hope this helps identifying it. Oils used:
  15. 1 point
    waitee

    Rebuilding my 540i... join me :)

    Tires 20 year old unloved seats + £5 leather restorer cream of ebay + a couple of microfibre cloths + about 30 min work! Fantastic results! (I also did the gear knob and door cards at the front.
  16. 1 point
    waitee

    Rebuilding my 540i... join me :)

    Started to refurb some rocker covers I got from a scrapped Land Rover. spent 6 hours cleaning them up! nasty holy gungy shit! I have VHT wrinkle black to paint them with, should come out great. After trying the VHT paint I wasn't happy with it, I should have done this from the start, took them to get dipped and powdercoated, couldn't be happier with the results. Need an end hose to go over the ventilation port that the X5 and landorver have which the e39 does not, but anything to block it will be fine.
  17. 1 point
    waitee

    Rebuilding my 540i... join me :)

    Ok. First job, bought the full kit from power flex UK, pretty nice looking bushes with lifetime warranty so hope this is one time only job! haha Starting at the rear, doing the whole lot. The hardest part is getting the old bushings out, use a press to make things easy, the new ones slide in real easy with the provided grease. A good thing about the poly bushes is you can torque them up without the car on the ground as they won't twist. Used a local engineering shop with their 20t press for a few I couldn't manage my self, mainly just took the rear subframe to them for Diff mounts, subframe mounts. What a difference to the handling.. WOW really WOW. feels Super tight, no funny creaks or clunks. Showing up that the shocks need changing, but that will come with a bit more cash in the bank. Ps also changed the rose joints!
  18. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    A small update. So continuing with the repairs.. Taking an ever so slightly different approach on this side, the original outer section of the outer front section being not seriously corroded was cleaned off ready for reuse. The beginnings of the closing piece was made up and placed in position to check for fit. This is the closing piece tacked.... ....and the whole lot welded. Just starting to clean off here also. Fully cleaned off and primed. Dummy floor refitted and sealed. I used an generic 3m seam sealer on this job. However, unlike a lot of their products, I didn't particularly rate it. Didn't go on that great and went off a little bit too quickly. Throttle pedal mount fitted...... ...Resealed and primed... ...and a thin covering of paint applied. With that completed, all four corners internally were now complete. Next time the rear outer w/arches and associated areas will be fitted to complete what became a long drawn out affair.
  19. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    A bit more... At this point, I started to sort out various minor issues related to the resto. First up was that nasty patch of rust on the o/s inner wing/rail. After cleaning off the surrounding under seal I was left with this... All corrosion was duly cut out. Turned out to be fairly localised. Then a simple repair piece was shaped....after consulting the other side of the car for guidance... But before welding it in, the inside of the rail was cleaned up as best as possible and then coated with more s80 Then welded... Followed by another piece to cover.. Completed, if a little untidy. ..and sealed. That sorted it was time for the T pedal mount. So starting with a piece of 3mm plate...initially I thought it not entirely suitable due to it having a chunk missing out of it, but it was the only piece I could find. Ultimately it worked out well. After a bout in the press I was left with this... ....and after a bit of cutting and grinding... ...It was tacked... And fully welded... After cleaning off, the left leg was repositioned to corresponded with the step in the floorpan. Experienced welders will spot immediately the minor mistake/oversight to this particular weld. The completed article. More soon
  20. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    Pressing on. Much more than a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel, as they say... With most of the rot gone... ..... I started fabricating pieces... ...firstly the floorpan repair section... ...Then the Inner sill shaped and tacked... ....while outer sill section was also cut to shape. Floor repair tacked into position..... ...Followed by starting to fully weld inner repair... ...followed immediately by fully welding the floor. Inner sill repair completed. Just now to clean it off. My solution for the jacking point was to majorly modify a rear strengthener. Not quite original but let's face it, who sees it once closed up? I did have to add the two little legs to allow full contact with the outer sill section.... ...that was fitted next. More soon.
  21. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    Time to continue.... Someone asked me if I enjoyed 'all that welding'. Well it can be pain as some of you know, but tbf it made a change from the usual day job. Luckily I was in a position that if it got too much, I could walk away from it and leave it be. I learnt so much from the experience, and gained so much more confidence that other projects I have that I would more than likely have sub'd out, I will now do myself. The only real negative is the time factor. It takes long to do a good job imo. One of the reasons welding and car restorations in general cost so much. Anyways.. It was clear that there was a serious problem when I attempted to remove the throttle pedal and it came off in my hand! After pulling back the carpet all was revealed.. The outside didn't give me cause for any optimism....or an easy job. From the other side Work cut out then..... Firstly the dummy floor was unstitched and removed. The rust patch to the right was also fully exposed at this point. Tbf it had been there for years but it had to go. We'll leave that to later, along with the pedal mount and other small items. With the dummy floor removed the extent of the rot was fully exposed. Not the end of the world but an inconvenience nevertheless. After a few days, with everything dried out and cleaned up to assess the damage and plan the way forward . There is barely any connection between the floorpan and sill. I decided to cut the floor out first then build the inner sill up and then fab and fit a new floor section. Here I've cut out the required areas ready for a repair section. Jeez that sill was rotten... In the meantime I started on the sill repair. Again this section was still fairly sound requiring only a good grinding back to bright and capable of being reused. After some heavy cutting..... Everything was heavily corroded including the lifting point. By far worse then the n/s. The drain tube is clearly visible in the centre of the image. Note the the profile of the jacking point. Couldn't salvage it unfortunately. With the majority of corrosion removed it was time to start fabricating.... More soon.
  22. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    So, movin on to the n/s/f sill section..... From the outside it was obvious remedial work was necessary..... ...But from the inside it was clear the rot was extensive. Note the 3/8th extension pushed through from the outside, at the top of the image. Also the actual floor itself had been distorted upwards, again due to incorrect use of a trolley jack way back in the distant past. View from underneath. What's left of the three drain exits are visible, but clogged with debris. Here's the view after the first cut. Inner sill gone, dummy floor damaged. However, the cut section first removed was basically sound, only needing a good cleaning off and was suitable for reuse. Here, I've removed the dummy floor..... .....and a portion more of the outer sill, revealing the heavily corroded jacking point strengthener. Another image of the problem area from inside after a little clearing..... ..and after the rot has been cut out.. ..and with a simple right angled repair plate welded into position. The floor itself was reshaped back to it's original shape Here, the first of two inner sill repair sections is tacked into place. Jack strengthener now removed. 2nd section marked and shaped.. ..clamped and tacked.. ..and welded. I was a bit pissed off with the whole job by now and it shows with me being lazy and not shaping the rear section correctly and having to infill that small triangular section at the top. I was using a fairly powerful, but old machine that unfortunately was quite temperamental throughout the job. At times it would run perfectly but at others it could be a real pain. Settings-wise, I tended weld on the minimum setting with a suitable wire speed for the material being welded, i.e. 1.0mm sheet steel, but still had to go slow to avoid blowing through. Now a view from the rear. I actually made a major mistake here and had to modify it later on. I did not allow for enough depth. Not bad welding penetration if I can say so myself. A word on the jacking point strengtheners. They are not the same front to rear, so some improvisation may be need. Over time I had collected a few rear strengtheners so cutting a few up got me a repaired piece I could use. A bit of jiggery pokery.. Eventually got me this. Heres the area after cleaning off, just prior to replacing the jacking point. Note the three cut outs for the water drains. Reusing the outer section, the forward most section of the sill was formed... I had already decided to use the klokkerholm sills (I had previously purchased) for the outer repair, so this was cut to shape...wing refitted to check for fit, etc. A tiny bit of fettling was required to get the wing to sit just right. Repaired jacking point welded into position and cleaned off. Fully primed.... More BH s80 applied..... Outer section welded into place. The bottom of the jacking point must contact the top of the horizontal section of the repair piece. Even more s80 applied liberally. The shape of the klokkerholm section meant I modified my original closing panel. Original outer forward section welded back into position.. Revised fabricated closing piece.... ...goes in here to close off... ..and fully cleaned off and primed. From the rear. My previous mistake rectified. The two cut outs are for the spire clips for the lower wing mountings. I'd advise additional sealant to be added here when completed. Finally a small repair to the dummy floor. Wasn't at all happy with it's condition, so repaired. I believe both sides dummy floors are still available new from your local dealer. And refitted. Job jobbed on this corner. Next time we tackle the o/s and very necessary, extensive floor repairs.
  23. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    Pressing on.... Firstly an interesting shot. The three panels that join to form the bottom seam of the sills. From L to R, outer sill, inner sill, floor pan. Very strong method of construction. The gap to the right of centre to be filled in later. Anyways... A few weeks later it's time to fit the inner sill. Here's what it looks like (and unfortunately NLA both sides) Firstly all required spot welds drilled.. And inner sill removed. Note stiffener bracket now in place. The two 13mm bolts for the forward suspension braces bolt in here. Plenty of BH S50... With the car on its wheels, the inner sill is tacked into position... ...and fully welded... ..and covered off for the time being in BH electrox. I decided to leave the outer sill fitment to the very last. With the rear sills now 90% complete, I moved on to the N/S front.... Says it all.... I decided to repair the original wing. Original wings always seem to fit better than repro items and they only tend to rot at the lower sill section. I had cleaned up this area some 8yrs previously but as can be seen, it was now heavily corroded. I had a old spare wing hanging about that was a pattern and a bit scruffy, but solid. So got to work. The lower section as usual was completely gone. Only the under seal was holding it together.... Here it's cut, joined and tacked... ...Welded and partially cleaned off. A small skim of filler would be to finish if necessary. However the trim disguises any anomaly. So that was the wing done. Plenty more to do. Next time we get deep into e34 front sills and floor repairs.
  24. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    So to continue. With all rot now cut out it was time to start reconstructing. All salvaged pieces were fettled and tidied though I did have to make some minor repairs. Rear floor section. Note profile shape. I wasn't happy with the salvaged section of inner wheelarch so repaired that. Luckily, I was able to retain the profile of the section so a fairly straightforward repair. Poor section cut out.... Repaired and partially cleaned off. Also a small repair to the inner sill itself ...and cleaned off. With that done, it was time to start building up Floor section installed..... Then onto..... ...Rear wheelhouse lower repair section. This piece/area is usually damaged due to incorrect jack placement when lifting the car. And welded.. Then the repaired, rear inner wheel arch lower section clamped in place and cut. Tacked.... And welded. Rear suspension bracket fitted in place to double check fitment. All lined up perfectly.
  25. 1 point
    FIVE-OH

    The e34 rear sill thread

    Towards the end of 2016 I began to try and source the required panels for the repair. New for all realistically was out of the question. The outer sill/wheel arch, inner sill, lower inner wheel arch, and a section of floor were all required, So after a few weeks looking in various breakers yards and dismantlers with no success, by chance I came across a late model 525 in Hemel Hempstead, just in, complete and fairly clean. It had apparently failed its annual MOT and whoever owned it just couldn't be bothered with it any longer. I unfortunately missed this car by a matter of a few hours. By the time I seen it, it was already doomed, having been bought to be stripped of engine and g'box, all it's running gear, opening panels and wings to be shipped to Eastern Europe. I would have happily smoked around in it had I got to it in time. High mileage but plenty of life in it. A bit of a shame. After a thorough inspection of the rear sills and finding them to be in exceptionally good condition, I arranged with the staff to have them cut out completely. I'll admit. I moaned when quoted £85 for the pair but in the end it was money more than well spent. Also, to be fair to them, with the time and effort it would have taken, plus the gas used, the quoted price was more than fair. I immediately began to unstitch the welds to salvage what was needed. One side was pretty much perfect but the other did have some corrosion that did require repair.... Without these inner sections the job would have become unviable on grounds of cost imo. Also only one side inner sill was available from BMW at the time. Nowadays, both sides are NLA. I had started on the o/s but and I'll come back to that side later .. Now the real work begins First cut. Same story.... Seen clearly here is the drain tube for the sunroof. Too short in length imo. Should go down to the very bottom of the sill to channel water straight out of the drains. Heavy rot on floor section. More cutting.. plenty more of this forthcoming. Rear section of inner sill and rear inner lower wheel arch fully exposed. The 'brown' areas speak for themselves.. Heavily corroded floor section. Completely rotten. Mounting for rear brackets about to give way. This area is behind the inner sill. That little spot of rust... ...Turned out to be much more deep seated... Here, the majority of rot has been cut out, though it still looks awful. It's basically all sound steel. Same location after a thorough cleaning up with a knot wheel. The n/s/r corner was by far the hardest to tackle. All the wiring inside the car in the vicinity of the repair needed to be moved due to the risk of burning and to provide additional access. The external fuel pipes also should be removed, but I got round that by covering them with some aluminium plating and being very careful. I used bilt hambers excellent electrox zinc rich primer to coat. I purchased the superb (imo) OEM BMW rear outer sill/wheelarch sections part# 41 00 8181 707/8. Readily available if a little pricey. So far I'd only been cutting. In the next part I will be preparing the salvaged inner panels and welding them into position. More soon.


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