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stevewilley

What did you do to your E39 today ?

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18 minutes ago, sharkfan said:

Sunblinds bought from https://www.carshades.co.uk/index.php. I wanted these to keep prying eyes out when I'm carting stuff about. They fit superbly well and are also on sale at the moment. There's only pictures of the Touring rear side windows and the tailgate as my car already has the OEM rear door blinds. You can also the OEM Touring 12v Boot socket where the battery maintainer is plugged in...

30351_100120192073s_1.jpg

 

 

 

These just slot or clip into place and because they only come as a complete set (and I have the OEM rear door blinds) I have the two rear door blinds going spare.

 

Rear seat E38 Cupholder and rear seat 12v sockets and USB socket. They are wired through to the front 12v socket but separately fused. I retro-fitted the E38 rear seat TV button and AV in/out sockets years ago....

 

 

I apologise in advance if you've posted about this before but..... the rear (in the boot) 12v outlet.... how / where did you get that? :) If it's a retrofit, how easy is it to install? Thanks!

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This is the thread you need ...

 

http://forum.bmw5.co.uk/topic/48374-has-anyone-retro-fitted-an-e39-boot-socket/?tab=comments#comment-497805

 

All the part numbers are there; you need brave pills to cut through the carpet of the side panel but a bit of care and it'll look great. The wiring is very simple stuff.

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36 minutes ago, sharkfan said:

Sunblinds bought from https://www.carshades.co.uk/index.php. I wanted these to keep prying eyes out when I'm carting stuff about. They fit superbly well and are also on sale at the moment.

 

'Sup Shark, was planning on getting some of the usual generic suction cup blinds for summer now that I've got a nipper in the back, never occurred to me to look for ones specifically for my car (no idea why!), so these are interesting. Mind a couple of questions?

 

- From looking at the fitting instructions at https://www.carshades.co.uk/privacy-shades-series-touring-p-4405.html it appears that the side rear load area ones just slot into place, no clips etc? Guessing that pressure of the edges of them against the frame holds them in?

- The tailgate ones look like they use clips which slot into the glass surround, but how tightly do these hold the shade against the glass, i.e does it shift around / rattle away from and against the glass?

- I don't have rear door blinds unlike yourself, so would be using what they provide... But it looks like their door blinds require sticking clips to the window surround with adhesive (which I'm not keen on doing).

- Mine's a Touring too, so added bonus for me of concealing load area as well, any chance of a few pics of them from outside?

 

Sorry for asking you to do Carshades job for them, but I value the opinion of a consumer over a company any day! Thanks in advance for any answers which you care to give.

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On 4 January 2019 at 22:25, oberlointment said:

 

Interested in this but my understanding is that you need the two rear door cards to go with it. 

 

What aftermarket blinds did you purchase?

 

Some excellent work there with your touring. Glad your enjoying her again. 

 

The link for the aftermarket blinds is in the post with the pictures. The aftermarket door blinds do not fit a car that has the OEM rear door blinds. The aftermarket blinds use a one or two very small clips to keep them secure.

 

If anyone local to me wants just the aftermarket rear door blinds then they can have them for £20 instead of buying a whole set.

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8 minutes ago, sharkfan said:

This is the thread you need ...

 

http://forum.bmw5.co.uk/topic/48374-has-anyone-retro-fitted-an-e39-boot-socket/?tab=comments#comment-497805

 

All the part numbers are there; you need brave pills to cut through the carpet of the side panel but a bit of care and it'll look great. The wiring is very simple stuff.

 

Tremendous - thankyou!

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4 minutes ago, Pzero said:

 

'Sup Shark, was planning on getting some of the usual generic suction cup blinds for summer now that I've got a nipper in the back, never occurred to me to look for ones specifically for my car (no idea why!), so these are interesting. Mind a couple of questions?

 

- From looking at the fitting instructions at https://www.carshades.co.uk/privacy-shades-series-touring-p-4405.html it appears that the side rear load area ones just slot into place, no clips etc? Guessing that pressure of the edges of them against the frame holds them in?

- The tailgate ones look like they use clips which slot into the glass surround, but how tightly do these hold the shade against the glass, i.e does it shift around / rattle away from and against the glass?

- I don't have rear door blinds unlike yourself, so would be using what they provide... But it looks like their door blinds require sticking clips to the window surround with adhesive (which I'm not keen on doing).

- Mine's a Touring too, so added bonus for me of concealing load area as well, any chance of a few pics of them from outside?

 

Sorry for asking you to do Carshades job for them, but I value the opinion of a consumer over a company any day! Thanks in advance for any answers which you care to give.

 

Very quickly then; 

Yes the rear Touring window blinds just slot very tightly into place.

The tailgate ones use one clip each then one clip to hold them true in the centre. They don't rattle at all and are very secure.

The rear door blinds use two self-adhesive slots top and bottom. 

I tried to take photographs from the outside but they are pretty dark so you just get reflection.

 

I have no problem recommending them, they're very well made and fit pretty much perfectly. For a saloon car without any blinds they are far more cost effective than trying to get hold of the OEM blinds; for a Touring they are the only blinds you can get hold of for the rear of the car, and again more cost effective.

 

Whether you want to put the adhesive clips in your car is up to you, but if you need blinds for kids they are really good.

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On 9 January 2019 at 10:10, TeddyRuxpin said:

Pics are all out of correct order... oh well!

 

That was an outstanding effort on the front lights; can I ask what compounds and polishes you used please?

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Nice one, thanks for taking the time to respond :)

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51 minutes ago, chicaneuk said:

 

I apologise in advance if you've posted about this before but..... the rear (in the boot) 12v outlet.... how / where did you get that? :) If it's a retrofit, how easy is it to install? Thanks!

 

More pics in this thread...

 

http://forum.bmw5.co.uk/topic/68873-quick-how-to-fitting-a-saloon-boot-socket/?tab=comments#comment-708076

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1 hour ago, sharkfan said:

I changed the 2001 gearchange direction and +/- indication to the later, more easily used, configuration soon after getting the car. I have changed the E38 as well....

 

Funny that, I did the opposite when I had my 03 E39, not that I ever changed gear manually mind you. 

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Because they have a torque convertor lock up in every gear the Alpina Switch-Tronic is very much like a manual gearbox in manual mode so I have almost always driven them as manuals and only use them in automatic mode when I'm set in cruise on a motorway, stuck in a traffic jam or just plain old feeling lazy.

 

I have driven modern BMW's with both the eight speed auto and seven speed manual and none have the engine breaking you need for actual driving on A and B roads like the Alpina' s and a manual gearbox have imho.

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Got a check coolant light.

Checked coolant.

Found coolant was indeed low.

Filled coolant and wondered how much more coolant would be need before float moved at all. 

Tapped float, which suddenly sprung up two inches above filler cap level.

Swore a lot.

 

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On 10/01/2019 at 21:12, sharkfan said:

 

That was an outstanding effort on the front lights; can I ask what compounds and polishes you used please?

 

Thank you! I think if I had to do it again, I could do it even better. I forgot to alternate the direction of the sanding between grades of wet/dry paper, and overall it was a learning experience.

 

I used wet and dry paper first off - I used the grits 400 / 600 / 800 / 1200, then I used the small pads within the Meguiars One Step Headlight Restoration kit (they are essentially just even finer grades of sandpaper). Then I used the drill attachment and the polishing compound from the Meguiars kit. I was a bit crap at this. Then I sealed with: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00A3S1RGU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

This UV sealant is supposed to be a bit more permanent than just wax - I wasn't brave enough to do it proper (cover the car and spray clear coat)

 

I think my lights/car had been previously polished (I have an invoice from a previous owner that said he had BMW polish the car at least once) and the lenses were clear when I bought it three years ago. I think it was polished/sanded but it wasn't sealed, so the lights were especially bad as they had no protection.

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On 10/01/2019 at 22:05, sharkfan said:

Because they have a torque convertor lock up in every gear the Alpina Switch-Tronic is very much like a manual gearbox in manual mode so I have almost always driven them as manuals and only use them in automatic mode when I'm set in cruise on a motorway, stuck in a traffic jam or just plain old feeling lazy.

 

I have driven modern BMW's with both the eight speed auto and seven speed manual and none have the engine breaking you need for actual driving on A and B roads like the Alpina' s and a manual gearbox have imho.

 

I don't think the TC will lock up in every gear even on an Alpina, the TC slip is what enables an epicylic gearbox to make smooth gear changes.

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47 minutes ago, eb88 said:

Bagged a fully loaded 2002 540i with 62k miles for £2800. Good service, rocker cover gaskets and full transmission flush and filter is all she wanted. They're still out there.

IMG_20190118_173533.jpg

Nice one, more pics and details!

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1 hour ago, eb88 said:

Bagged a fully loaded 2002 540i with 62k miles for £2800. Good service, rocker cover gaskets and full transmission flush and filter is all she wanted. They're still out there.

IMG_20190118_173533.jpg

3

 

We need more pictures :) Change those headlamp bolts  and that bays pretty much perfect   :wub:

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All eight have already been replaced since that photo, it's a great spec (GF13728) M sports suspension and bits all factory fitted, sitting on paralles, electric roller blind, nav, v50 phone etc. It had a scratch on every panel, so will be going in to the body shop for a full respray next week along with genuine sport bumpers and mirrors. Only other photo I have is after I replaced the adjusters and lenses on the headlights + fitted the latest Osram D2S Xenarc Lasers (can't believe the difference) 

 

IMG_20190117_195047.jpg

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7 hours ago, eb88 said:

Bagged a fully loaded 2002 540i with 62k miles for £2800. Good service, rocker cover gaskets and full transmission flush and filter is all she wanted. They're still out there.

IMG_20190118_173533.jpg

 

 ^^Well done that man! 

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I've noticed for the past couple months an erratic fuel gauge, and I knew it was the stepper motor, since the digital readings were stable.

 

So I'm finally ready to tackle the job. Should be straight forward, and I already have a spare motor. I pull the cluster out, get the rear cover off and proceed to pull the needles. Unmitigated disaster! Four out of five needles pulled out of the motors by the shafts, mangling the hairline springs in the process. I quickly find a local chap who's breaking an e39 and give him £25 for the clocks. It's the high cluster model, but that's ok, I only need the motors. So I'm covered for the worst now.

 

With that out of the way, I really wanted to see if I can rescue the old motors. After some poking and testing, my conclusion is as follows: those springs do not have any bearing on the actual indexing of the needles. That's done 100% by the stepper, as one would expect. However, without the spring, the needle shaft has a propensity to bottom out inside the motor. There is about 1mm axial play, and left alone, shaft will bottom out and rub inside of the motor casing. The purpose of the spring is to keep the shaft in suspension, axially, away from the extremities, so it's as friction-free as possible. The fact that the spring has a very slight 'return' built in (i.e. move the needle clockwise and it will slowly return to initial position) is coincidental, like a side effect of the method they've choose to keep that shaft axially centered.

 

So my fix was to ditch the spring completely and use a very small bushing press-fitted on the shaft, as a hard stop on the outside. The bushing is made of delrin plastic (very low coefficient of friction) and with a tiny dab of ATF oil, it really is as good as factory. In any case, the stepper motor is way able to overcome the friction generated by the bushings, even without the oil. But as I said, not strong enough to operate with the shaft in a bottomed-out state. If you just ditch the springs and don't put anything in their place, half of you needles might actually work (and for how long?), and the rest will get sticky. Also, I suspect VDO choose the spring solution because it's completely bombproof and maintenance free, whereas something like a bushing might get sticky after 10 year of service.

 

I have attached a cross-section drawing to clarify.

 

Cluster now fitted to the car and working great. I also coded the fuel reserve warning light to come on much later, at about 3l instead of the default 8l.

 

 

clocks.jpg

Edited by Tomcat

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