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gine39530d

copper grease vs ceramic grease

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i wonder can i use copper grease in injectors lubrication? 

would not it seize over time? 

ceramic grease is better than copper in every way? 

 

Edited by gine39530d

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They should not seize. There's a rubber o-ring that seals to stop oil ingress, but there is no contact between the head and the injector, so it should not stick.

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If the engine runs badly it can carbonise hence finding videos of people using pullers to get them out. You shouldn't use copper grease on aluminum so best to buy some ceramic based anti seize compound.

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When you are mating the same metals together but it really has no place on a modern car as the ceramic based compounds normally exceed copper based.

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3 hours ago, GoNz0 said:

 it really has no place on a modern car as the ceramic based compounds normally exceed copper based.

 

So after 30 years of putting copaslip on my spark plug threads I need to stop?

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51 minutes ago, BarryM said:

 

So after 30 years of putting copaslip on my spark plug threads I need to stop?

 

The ones I fitted to my E60 were the only things on that car I didn't use copper grease on cos the box that they came in specifically said not to grease them.

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1 minute ago, BarryM said:

 

That’s interesting but nothing to do with spark plugs :)

If you say so, you are still putting 3 metals together and making a battery with an aluminum head if you use it, who needs thread to screw a spark plug into :lol:

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Well I was always told it was an anti seize so stopped the spark plugs stripping the thread in the head on removal and I never stripped one.....guess my motorbikes didn’t have aluminium heads


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12 hours ago, GoNz0 said:

If you say so, you are still putting 3 metals together and making a battery with an aluminum head if you use it, who needs thread to screw a spark plug into :lol:

 

But realistically how long would the galvanic corrosion take to damage the head enough to ruin the threads?

 

What electrolyte are you envisaging sloshing around in the spark plug wells?

 

 

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But realistically how long would the galvanic corrosion take to damage the head enough to ruin the threads?
 
What electrolyte are you envisaging sloshing around in the spark plug wells?
 
 
I have no idea, I'm just pointing out facts with a random link explaining why.

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2 minutes ago, GoNz0 said:

I have no idea, I'm just pointing out facts with a random link explaining why.

 

Your link explains why on brakes where you can get salty water over winter months which acts as an electrolyte.

 

Without the presence of an electrolyte, you won't get any corrosion.  No electrolytes in spark plug wells = no corrosion.

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Live and learn, my old Jap & German bikes didn’t come to any harm using copaslip but I guess times and technology move on.

One interesting thing is I also use copaslip between the alloy wheel and steel hub so will be changing that!


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3 minutes ago, BarryM said:


One interesting thing is I also use copaslip between the alloy wheel and steel hub so will be changing that!

 

Yeah after reading GoNz0's link in my brake post, I'll be rectifying that at the next wheel winter/summer wheel swap.  

 

Good dose of Normfest brake cleaner to get rid of it me thinks.

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https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/cp4l/p/-/-/-/-/?NOR2894449&0&cc5_150

As a Normfest fan I have been using this on my wheels with great result, I also spray it onto suspension bolts once they have been torqued down to prevent the rust setting in. I blast it off with brake cleaner before I take the car in for an alignment.

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Interesting, I've used copper grease on things for years without issue but will by some ceramic grease next i need some.

 

I suspect its those of us who have grown up with cast iron heads and steel wheels that persist with copperslip having not given a second thought but of course so many car parts are aluminium these days (wheels, heads, suspension parts etc) its logical to change.

 

That said i still see a place for the copperslip - between a disc and hub or on a bolt into a steel/ iron component where the dissimilar metal issue isn't a problem.

 

 

 

 

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Useful to have read this article. I have used copper grease for over 50 years but I did notice that the alloy wheels on my E39 always stuck to the hubs despite using copper grease. I now know why and have ordered some ceramic grease for future use.

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Interesting. When I took my wheels off for the first time they were stuck solid to the hubs so after cleaning they went back on with a film of copper grease. Next time I removed them it was easier but still some adhesion. Looks like I'll have to get meself some of the ceramic stuff too. 

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nowadays manufacturers build stuff out of cheap garbage from china

 

no more of solid metal...just cheap tinfoil aluminium

 

good for business u know

Edited by gine39530d

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