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sams255

F11 water pumps

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A mate of mine has the previous 5 series and said his water pump failed. I completely forgot about that as a serviceable item. I just wanted to know if anyone ever had any issues with waters pumps on the F series especially diesel.  When is the water pump recommended to be changed? Normally you would do it when you do the cam belt but seeing as we have chains i don't think its on anyone's minds.  what is everyone's thoughts? 

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1 hour ago, sams255 said:

A mate of mine has the previous 5 series and said his water pump failed. I completely forgot about that as a serviceable item. I just wanted to know if anyone ever had any issues with waters pumps on the F series especially diesel.  When is the water pump recommended to be changed? Normally you would do it when you do the cam belt but seeing as we have chains i don't think its on anyone's minds.  what is everyone's thoughts? 

 

Never heard of failures nor thought about the water pump on the F11.

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3 minutes ago, Matthew Ashton said:

 

Never heard of failures nor thought about the water pump on the F11.

 so when should one be changed?im racking up the miles on my f11. up to 165k soon.  i dont think its been changed in its life. or do you wait till it stops working etc

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6 minutes ago, sams255 said:

 so when should one be changed?im racking up the miles on my f11. up to 165k soon.  i dont think its been changed in its life. or do you wait till it stops working etc

 

There is no recommended service interval so all you will get here on the forum is opinion and conjecture. It boils down how concerned you are about it and if you feel strongly get it changed. 

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I'm not 100% sure if the Diesel engined cars have a (auxiliary not cam) belt driven water pump or a 12V driven water pump.  As Matthew said, its not know for failing on this generation of 5 Series so its not really mentioned.

 

If it was in E39 you would have probably had to change it by now.  Plastic impeller used to shear off leading to rise in engine temp, leading to a cooked engine.  I changed out my E39 water pump to preempt a failure when I was in replacing the thermostat.  My E60 water pump gave no issues.

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22 minutes ago, 535i Andrew said:

I'm not 100% sure if the Diesel engined cars have a (auxiliary not cam) belt driven water pump or a 12V driven water pump.  As Matthew said, its not know for failing on this generation of 5 Series so its not really mentioned.

 

If it was in E39 you would have probably had to change it by now.  Plastic impeller used to shear off leading to rise in engine temp, leading to a cooked engine.  I changed out my E39 water pump to preempt a failure when I was in replacing the thermostat.  My E60 water pump gave no issues.

 

Pump is auxiliary belt driven.Come on dude, the E39 was in a different era and bears little in relation to the F11 with the N57.

Edited by Matthew Ashton

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just took a look at costs on the N57 they are cheap around 50-80 pounds for the aftermarket. Not so sure about Genuine but don't expect to be that much more expensive. Looking at the diagram and photos of the water pump, it appears to be just like the old mechanical ones with a metal impeller and belt driven. that's probably why we don't really hear of them failing. Probably ditched those electronic  ones

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While we are on subject how would you bleed the air out of system if you are to change it, ista d says you need to vacuum fill it to avoid air. I read a few topics around it but they all refer to the electric ones the petrols. Also does anybody knwo how many stats the B47 comes with? 

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Old method was.....

 

Fill the system with the ignition on and the heaters set to hot so as to open up the heater valves and bleed out via the bleed screw(s).  With the expansion cap open rev the engine sharply a few times and top up as required. 

 

The TIS method looks a bit of a faff with the vacuum system.

 

 

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20 minutes ago, 535i Andrew said:

Old method was.....

 

Fill the system with the ignition on and the heaters set to hot so as to open up the heater valves and bleed out via the bleed screw(s).  With the expansion cap open rev the engine sharply a few times and top up as required. 

 

The TIS method looks a bit of a faff with the vacuum system.

 

 

 

Conversely the modern electric pumps can bleed the air for you. I think the procedure is on TIS but can't get it right now. 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, bmwmike said:

 

Conversely the modern electric pumps can bleed the air for you. I think the procedure is on TIS but can't get it right now. 

 

 

 

Good call, after replacing the electric pump, usual funny stuff of switching on head lights (stops it going to sleep), press and hold throttle for ten seconds don't start engine, don't have it in ECOslow mode......

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-535i-lim_201301/repair-manuals/11-engine/11-51-coolant-pump-with-drive/B9jHaF1a

 

and it self bleeds.

 

Any back to the subject of Diesel engines and their water pumps

 

TIS instructions for water pump replacement for N57T (my dads old 530d as reference)

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-530d-lim_201209/repair-manuals/11-engine/11-51-coolant-pump-with-drive/G6VbhUgf

 

which as @sams255 pointed out earlier is a proper old skool mechanical pump, a bit like the one in my E39 of 20 years ago.  That link above doesn't tell you how to bleed it, normally it gives you a link to the next relevant task.

 

Another look on TIS reveals that you fill it via the vacuum method which looks a pain and then you bleed/vent it by this method

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-530d-lim_201209/repair-manuals/17-cooling/JLmz6P6L

 

I don't see why you can't fill it without the vacuum kit and then vent/bleed as described in the link above?  The vacuum fill probably makes it easier in a workshop where there is a convenient supply of compressed air and is less time consumming than slowly filling the system.

 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, 535i Andrew said:

 

Good call, after replacing the electric pump, usual funny stuff of switching on head lights (stops it going to sleep), press and hold throttle for ten seconds don't start engine, don't have it in ECOslow mode......

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-535i-lim_201301/repair-manuals/11-engine/11-51-coolant-pump-with-drive/B9jHaF1a

 

and it self bleeds.

 

Any back to the subject of Diesel engines and their water pumps

 

TIS instructions for water pump replacement for N57T (my dads old 530d as reference)

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-530d-lim_201209/repair-manuals/11-engine/11-51-coolant-pump-with-drive/G6VbhUgf

 

which as @sams255 pointed out earlier is a proper old skool mechanical pump, a bit like the one in my E39 of 20 years ago.  That link above doesn't tell you how to bleed it, normally it gives you a link to the next relevant task.

 

Another look on TIS reveals that you fill it via the vacuum method which looks a pain and then you bleed/vent it by this method

 

https://www.newtis.info/tisv2/a/en/f10-530d-lim_201209/repair-manuals/17-cooling/JLmz6P6L

 

I don't see why you can't fill it without the vacuum kit and then vent/bleed as described in the link above?  The vacuum fill probably makes it easier in a workshop where there is a convenient supply of compressed air and is less time consumming than slowly filling the system.

 

is it me being daft or is it actually called brake bleeding on 3rd link for coolant?

 

Andrew do you have any instructions for bleeding it via bleeder or where it maybe located for b47? if there is one

 

 

 

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I’ve read that TiS vacuum full process multiple times and wouldn’t undertake this job myself. After suffering an air lock on my old Vectra leading to a “maintenance induced fatality” I wouldn’t risk it on the BMWs without the BMW stated tools and process. But that’s me (thought I’d just get that last point in there) 

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1 hour ago, Matthew Ashton said:

After suffering an air lock on my old Vectra leading to a “maintenance induced fatality” I wouldn’t risk it on the BMWs without the BMW stated tools and process. But that’s me (thought I’d just get that last point in there) 

 

Scars on your back and by the sounds of things, the wallet too. What happened? 

 

Fair enough, there will be a good reason for the vacuum process. I just haven't figured that one out yet. It sounds odd as you apply a positive pressure to the system to test it for leaks.

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1 hour ago, 535i Andrew said:

 

Scars on your back and by the sounds of things, the wallet too. What happened? 

 

Changed the Vectra’s coolant as part of the service, went through the bleed process used many tones before on many different cars and all seemed fine. I went away on business and got the dreaded phone call - header tank empty and car’s temp gauge temporarily went off the scale back down again. An airlock in the system somewhere and that was the end of the head. Hurt the pocket somewhat. 

 

 

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