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Touring rear brake lines

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Hi all

 

Just been told I will need to get the rear brake lines replaced soon due to corrosion... and apparently that requires quite a lot of stuff removing and will therefore be pretty expensive.

 

How much effort is it really, do the tank and the rear axle really need to be dropped? What sort of money should I expect to have to pay..?

 

Thanks

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I’ve done it on the drive, hardest bit was the exhaust down pipe bolts which had to be drilled out. The rest is all just nuts and bolts. You can reroute the pipes around the side of the fuel tank which won’t follow the original route but can be made to work ok. Mine had been done like that by a garage for the previous owner but in copper which I wasn’t happy with hence re doing it.

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47 minutes ago, lufbramatt said:

I’ve done it on the drive, hardest bit was the exhaust down pipe bolts which had to be drilled out. The rest is all just nuts and bolts. You can reroute the pipes around the side of the fuel tank which won’t follow the original route but can be made to work ok. Mine had been done like that by a garage for the previous owner but in copper which I wasn’t happy with hence re doing it.

 

Did you replace the pipes with OEM stuff or CuNiFer?

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That explains why the bill to replace my rear brake lines was so expensive when I had them done on my Touring soon after I first acquired it! Didn't appreciate that it was such a pig to do.. I thought I'd just gotten a bit stiffed on the bill. 

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Just to reiterate - My Dad and I did this recently on my 540i touring and the rear sub frame had to be dropped but the fuel tank stayed in place. Took us about 3 hours to remove the subframe and then my Dad did the brake pipes in probably about 6ish hours. Neither of us are mechanics but do work on our own cars and my Dad has a four poster ramp which made access a lot easier. Wasn't a difficult job, just time consuming. 

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Yes just drop the sub frame a bit, it’s not too hard really. You should keep the brake pedal pressed down a bit to stop air getting into the pump for the traction control too. 

 

There are some connections under the panel below the drivers feet you can connect the new rears to:

 

7W5SzIR.jpg

 

Then just get a tool like the one on the left here & you’re away:

c3NJ42G.jpg

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Hi,

 

I've had it done, most garages wouldn't touch it because it's an old car and there are going to be issues with rusty bolts, things breaking, etc. I found a mechanic that it for £400 cash in hand, because he used to have an Alpina that he raced and loves E39... of course, they found a 'bunch of other stuff that needed changing', and then they struggled for ages to bleed the damn thing properly... and charged for time 'researching' the problems... I think they regretted 'only' taking £400 and were trying to bump it up.

 

It's a lot of (a day's) work, and a ramp/lift is really helpful.

 

(Worst of all, on my very next MOT is an advisory for rusty rear brake pipes...)

 

If you do it, don't get the BMW OEM pipes as I did - they're painted and if they get scratched being installed (which they will), it will just rust again. Get something that doesn't rust!

 

Cheers,

 

Ed

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I went for the OEM route in cunifer on my M5. As said, exhausts off, prop off, drop subframe, drop RHS of fuel tank a bit. Got it done at garage as no access to lift and was 9hrs labour.

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5 hours ago, TeddyRuxpin said:

they found a 'bunch of other stuff that needed changing', and then they struggled for ages to bleed the damn thing properly... 

 

They are the main problems!

 

The bleading shouldn’t really be an issue though, the system is meant to be blead with the correct kit plugged in to cycle the DSC (traction control) pump. Keeping the brake pedal pressed down a bit for the whole time there is no fluid in the reservoir is ment to stop air getting into the pump.

 

It’s finding other stuff that could really get you, I did them while replacing most of the rear suspension & subframe bushes. It was the rust I found that really took the time to put right though & it hadn’t even gone through anywhere! 

Maybe a normal E39 is different but there really is no need for dropping the exhaust or fuel tank on a touring. The exhaust just needs its rear two rubber mounts slipping off, that allows  the subframe to drop a bit when the bolts holding it are removed from one side at at time, but you have to be very careful the exhaust doesn’t end up holding the subframe, it won’t manage that without getting damaged! The ride hight sensors must be disconnected too or the wires will get ripped out. 

 

If you have air suspension the accumulators get in the way, again I was replacing them as part of the job.

 

The lines do go behind the fuel filler pipes but you just thread them in behind & bend them to shape on the car. It not hard to follow very close to the OME route. 

SLPoSFv.jpg

That is a lot easier to do with copper type pipe than the Steel from BMW! I fitted one of those from BMW on the front as I thought it would come pre bent to shape, they don’t! 

 

I had never made my own brake pipes before, but it really was easy with the proper tool (in my previous picture back up the page). 

 

I can well imagine many normal garages not being keen / quoting a silly price. My friend had a  supposedly good local garage make a right mess of fitting just one new pipe to his E46 M3 & they charged £200 for that. He took it home & re-did all the rears on his, only he got caught up replacing lots of other stuff at the same time & is now kind of wishing he hadn’t started with the car still in bits months later! 

Edited by Andyrt200
Grammar

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7 minutes ago, TeddyRuxpin said:

Yeah, I was told the BMW pipes would be bent into shape, but they weren't!

I bought genuines for my E36 to do both rears, was proper pissed off to find 2 long pipes bent in half :(

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And.... as most of these mechanics REALLY don't want to do the work as it's a PITA, do you reckon they're gonna take much care in making sure the OEM pipes are not gonna get scratched up when fitting?!

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Just had my car back from having the same thing, rear subframe and tank out they said. Plus the obvious "other stuff" and on the basis that my car has probably done 400 miles in the last 4 years, the handbrake drums and shoes wanted attention too. Add to that some MOT stuff on the front suspension and problems with the air con, the numbers certainly started to mount up. Feels nice and tight again though, must use it more.

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Yes, they told me the handbrake drum and does needed replacing too, and proceeded to fit it so badly that the handbrake is basically useless. Thankfully I have an automatic.

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9 hours ago, TeddyRuxpin said:

Yes, they told me the handbrake drum and does needed replacing too, and proceeded to fit it so badly that the handbrake is basically useless. Thankfully I have an automatic.

I assume they didn't bother following the setup procedure, download it and go back with it and make them do it :)

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Well, I bit the bullet and got it done at my local specialist - for £365. If anyone needs work doing in Kent, they're a bit out of the way but they've always looked after me: Bee Emm Workshops near Staplehurst

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