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amazighman

E39 530i oil leaks

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Good afternoon.

 

I was flicking through the service history of my car and spotted that it had ongoing oil leak issues on an off.

I decided to take a look and oh my good the underneath was covered in oil,also some oil stains on the ac compressor.

I tried to determine the source of the leak but i couldn't and my axle stands were used on another car.

Please see pictures , any advice to what are the common leak areas on these car?

Cheers

IMG20171018171033.jpg

IMG20171018172120.jpg

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Cam cover gasket and oil filter housing gasket wil definataly need done if they have never been done, both are usually the first to leak oil, power steering pipes are prone as well and it’s a bit grotty lower down the engine it can be hard to tell the difference between power steering fluid and oil, but if the power steering reservoir never drops  then probably oil 

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Definitely oil filter housing and camshaft cover would be the prime candidates looking at that spray pattern. Had the same on mine. Other option at the rear of the engine is the crankshaft oil seal and oil sump gasket but these are a pita to fix so if either needs doing, do them both at the same time. If you do the oil filter housing I’d recommend you clean the area all around it first and then make sure both surfaces are spotless before reassembly. There are some useful YouTube videos showing you how to do it but the most critical part is tightening the bolts up in the correct order to the correct torque. Otherwise it will still leak based on personal experience :-(

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Do the camshaft position sensor orings too. Our exhaust one was leaking, and it dripped onto the AC compressor. after being blown back while driving along.

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if you get smell coming through the cabin when the engine is warm then def cam cover or more likely cam cover gasket failing... they tend to towards the rear and the oil weeps/drips onto the exhaust manifold

 

if your car has done 70k plus miles then it should have had it changed once... ive had 3 m54 engined cars and all of them needed it at around that mileage

 

 

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Hi guys.

After thoroughly inspecting underneath the car i found out that my oil sump  is leaking from all sides.

Now  as i am new to BMW s i dont know much how to do it, but i guess subframe has to be removed, do i need engine support beam or there is another way around this.

Does anyone know a good diy?

Cheers

Edited by amazighman

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36 minutes ago, amazighman said:

Hi guys.

After thoroughly inspecting underneath the car i found out that my oil sump  is leaking from all sides.

Now  as i am new to BMW s i dont know much how to do it, but i guess subframe has to be removed, do i need engine support beam or there is another way around this.

Does anyone know a good diy?

Cheers

 

Are you sure that it's the sump (ie. have you cleaned it all off, thoroughly and then driven it normally and seen if the oil has come back)?

 

If not; do that (if you can) to make sure it is this, as oil can go along way when it's hot, more so from the oil filter housing gasket and cam cover gaskets, if they've failed. It'll travel down and coat everywhere underneath if left long enough!

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Today i went and removed the alternator as it was not working , i inspected near the oil filter housing and it is not dry , i will replace that gasket for good measure and give it a good clean and see if the oil leak stops.

I am still not convinced that all this oil leak is from the filter housing, i hope i wont need to replace the oil pan gasket as it looks a lots of work to do.

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10 hours ago, amazighman said:

Today i went and removed the alternator as it was not working , i inspected near the oil filter housing and it is not dry , i will replace that gasket for good measure and give it a good clean and see if the oil leak stops.

I am still not convinced that all this oil leak is from the filter housing, i hope i wont need to replace the oil pan gasket as it looks a lots of work to do.

 

Many folks have reported that leaks from the oil filter housing do travel along the sump, even as far as the  flywheel end, both sides. FWIW, that was my experience too. Since replacing the sump gasket is such a difficult, awkward job (especially if you're doing it on jack stands) it really is worthwhile cleaning the block carefully so it's possible to check for true leak points.

 

A leak point not mentioned in the posts above is the VANOS hose running from the OFH to the VANOS housing on the cylinder head. Mine leaked at the swaged/crimped fitting around the hose end, not the banjo bolt joints. I also had a seep through the electrical socket on the inlet cam position sensor, not the O-ring. Both led me to think my OFH gasket R&R (which was leaking when replaced) had failed after only a year. 

 

So based on my experience, I strongly recommend lots of degreaser and then a flashlight (torch, to you?) plus dental mirror to search for fresh oil tracks in all the nooks and crannies.

 

Regards,

RDL

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10 hours ago, rdl said:

 

Many folks have reported that leaks from the oil filter housing do travel along the sump, even as far as the  flywheel end, both sides. FWIW, that was my experience too. Since replacing the sump gasket is such a difficult, awkward job (especially if you're doing it on jack stands) it really is worthwhile cleaning the block carefully so it's possible to check for true leak points.

 

A leak point not mentioned in the posts above is the VANOS hose running from the OFH to the VANOS housing on the cylinder head. Mine leaked at the swaged/crimped fitting around the hose end, not the banjo bolt joints. I also had a seep through the electrical socket on the inlet cam position sensor, not the O-ring. Both led me to think my OFH gasket R&R (which was leaking when replaced) had failed after only a year. 

 

So based on my experience, I strongly recommend lots of degreaser and then a flashlight (torch, to you?) plus dental mirror to search for fresh oil tracks in all the nooks and crannies.

 

Regards,

RDL

Cheers for that RDL.

I have ordered an upgraded vanos hose which is braided and crimped with steel ends looks much more durable.

I will fit that and oil filter housing gasket and give it a good degrease and hope for the best

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I have fitted the new OFH gasket and uprated vanos hose.

I cleaned most of the oily mess underneath ,but i can still see some oil leaking around crankshaft pulley, i will give it another clean and see But I guess my crankshaft front seal has failed.

Does anybody know if any special tools are needed to remove the pulley and refit the new seal?

 

Cheers

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Simple answer, yes you will need special tools to remove the pulley/damper. Looking at the Haynes manual it advises removing the timing chain cover if you want to replace the crankshaft seal, so many speciallist tools, parts and time needed. If its not leaking too badly, leave it, unless you want to keep the car for a very long time, or you just enjoy taking things apart and making them look good again :wink:

 

tools numbers are 11 2 150 & 11 2 410 for two piece damper/ pulley and 11 8 190 & 11 8 200 for the one piece damper/ pulley. After that its a major job, cooling system drain, removal of  vanos, removal of thermostat and water pump etc.

 

 

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I notice Mashmanu's post describes Haynes as specifying special tools for the 2 piece damper. I rechecked TIS & no mention of those. I can't explain the difference.

 

I've never done this job, but TIS (BMW's shop manual) makes the following points.

 

1 there are two styles of vibration damper & TIS isn't explicit as to which is found on an M54. The 2 part style with 6 bolt attachment requires no special tools, but seems to be used on M52 engines, not your M54. The other, one part style, has 3 slots in an inner circumference & requires a special holding tool for the 410 Nm torque for the center bolt. BMW tool pt#s 11 8 190 & 11 8 200

2 If the 3 slot vibration damper doesn't then come off the crankshaft by hand, a special puller that engages the 3 slots is required to remove it. BMW tool pt#s 11 8 190 & 11 8 210.

3 A special tool set is specified to remove the old seal with the timing cover in place. Another special tool is specified to install the new seal. BMW tool #s 11 2 283, 11 2 385, 11 2 380 & 11 3 280.

 

If the timing cover is removed, which would probably make possible seal replacement with common hand tools, the following issues arise.

4 sump to be removed, a miserable job further requiring an engine support bar

5 the VANOS must be removed

6 there is a warning to check for damage  to the cylinder head gasket, presumably where the front timing cover contacts the head. If so, TIS says to remove head & replace gasket :-( Although one has to wonder if RTV wouldn't suffice??

 

Regards

RDL

Edited by rdl

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5 hours ago, rdl said:

I notice Mashmanu's post describes Haynes as specifying special tools for the 2 piece damper. I rechecked TIS & no mention of those. I can't explain the difference.

 

I've never done this job, but TIS (BMW's shop manual) makes the following points.

 

1 there are two styles of vibration damper & TIS isn't explicit as to which is found on an M54. The 2 part style with 6 bolt attachment requires no special tools, but seems to be used on M52 engines, not your M54. The other, one part style, has 3 slots in an inner circumference & requires a special holding tool for the 410 Nm torque for the center bolt. BMW tool pt#s 11 8 190 & 11 8 200

2 If the 3 slot vibration damper doesn't then come off the crankshaft by hand, a special puller that engages the 3 slots is required to remove it. BMW tool pt#s 11 8 190 & 11 8 210.

3 A special tool set is specified to remove the old seal with the timing cover in place. Another special tool is specified to install the new seal. BMW tool #s 11 2 283, 11 2 385, 11 2 380 & 11 3 280.

 

If the timing cover is removed, which would probably make possible seal replacement with common hand tools, the following issues arise.

4 sump to be removed, a miserable job further requiring an engine support bar

5 the VANOS must be removed

6 there is a warning to check for damage  to the cylinder head gasket, presumably where the front timing cover contacts the head. If so, TIS says to remove head & replace gasket :-( Although one has to wonder if RTV wouldn't suffice??

 

Regards

RDL

 

Hi.

 

From my inspection i found out i have got a one piece pulley that has 1 big bolt in middle. There will be enough room if i remove the clutch fan, i am not sure why vanos and timing cover need to come off 

Is there any other way to remove the seal without special tools , i have seen videos of people using a screwdriver to pry off the seal 

https://youtu.be/VsKKODIgVqU

Again i believe those special tools will be very expensive for a one time use only.

Does anyone know how much will a garage charge to replace that seal  in the UK?

Cheers

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The only reason to remove the timing cover would be to improve access to the seal for removal and replacement. TIS does not call for cover removal. It lists only my (abbreviated) points 1 - 3 for seal R&R.

 

I've never had to do the job :-) so can't comment on the need for BMW tool set vs common hand tools. Perhaps because there is a key on the crankshaft nose for the damper/pulley & there is concern at nicking something. Or perhaps not enough room to pry the old seal out without scratching something. 

With luck, someone who has done the job will chime in with advice.

 

EDIT: I played the youtube video. Parts sure came apart easily, especially the 410 Nm bolt holding the damper to the crankshaft. But it does show the seal being replaced without the BMW tool kit.

 

Regards

RDL

Edited by rdl

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There’s another video showing it removed from underneath with a screwdriver. Seemed to come out far too easily imho. If that works then that’s a simple job. 

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24 minutes ago, Mashmanu said:

There’s another video showing it removed from underneath with a screwdriver. Seemed to come out far too easily imho. If that works then that’s a simple job. 

How much do you think it ll cost to replace at a BMW specialist who should have the proper tools for the job?

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