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535i Andrew

Ebay advice required

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Sold something on ebay last week. Total sale just over £15 inc postage.

 

Posted item 2nd class Royal Mail and obtained proof of postage on Thursday 21st July.

 

Today the buyer e-mails to ask where the item is.

 

I respond to tell him I posted it last week and have proof of postage and that I will contact Royal Mail and advise him.

 

Any thoughts on what I should do next?

 

I'm new to the selling lark with not having issues in the past so unsure as to what I can do, hence the request for advice from on here.

 

Thanks

 

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I think from memory the proof of postage will come into play 1 month after. Basically if the item still hasn't turned up after a month it is up to the buyer to chase royal mail to see what's happened. Not sure what happens in terms of reimbursement if the item is lost altogether

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2nd class is a crap service, but generally lands!

 

Give it 10 days and then chase with RM

 

Thing is, the buyer can easily say they haven;t got the item and you've not got a leg to stand on, that's why I always pay for a signed service these days, it's not that much more!

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56 minutes ago, d_a_n1979 said:

Thing is, the buyer can easily say they haven;t got the item and you've not got a leg to stand on, that's why I always pay for a signed service these days, it's not that much more!

 

That's my worry!

 

Signed postage add another £1.10 on top of £2.85 postage cost.  Plus cost of the packaging, plus costs of ebay (10% total) and paypal (3.4% total)  and you are looking at then charging getting on for £5.00 otherwise you loose money on it.

 

Looking at ebay basically I've to refund the item and then take it up with Royal Mail.  Royal Mail say three days for delivery which has unfortunately passed in my case.

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Hi,

 

PeteLPG - that's incorrect. It's up to the seller to chase up where the parcel/package/packet is. This is quite simply because it's the seller that has a contract with whichever service is used to send the item. 

 

535iAR - On the item in this case which is low cost, and if the item doesn't turn up, then you'll need to refund the buyer including the postage costs. As you only have proof of sending, I don't think that has insurance so you'll unfortunately lose out in this case. Like Dan above, I always send anything recorded delivery and mention it in adverts etc. Depending on what the item is and it's value, you can look between royal mail and courier services. There's lots of risks when selling for sure as there's plenty of people trying to abuse the system for their benefit, but if you do use the correct services and use insurance etc, then in case/when things do go wrong you at least have the chance to claim. That may take weeks or even a few months, but it seems worth it once you get your money back. 

 

I strongly suggest to always send via recorded delivery and insure for more if the item warrants it.

 

Cheers, Dennis!

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Personally I try not to sell anything via eBay any more; they're complete bastards, as are PayPal, and generally as the seller, you lose no matter how you try and fight your side of it!

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As others have said, best to send insured and/or 'signed for'. It's more expensive, but it's the buyer who pays the carriage of course.

Luckily it's a low cost item so not quite as painful as it might be. I'm not a heavy Ebayer by any means but have only had a couple of problems in many years, both from idiots who won auctions then didn't pay.

Sent from my Vodafone Smart ultra 6 using Tapatalk

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Thanks lads

 

yeah send recorded/signed for next time. Fingers burnt!

 

It was a set of handbooks from my first E60 which got stolen, handbook not in the car at the time, guess anything with that car is jinxed!

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3 hours ago, PeteLPG said:

I think for anything slightly heavier and larger than a large letter then hermes is normally the cheapest option...plus their website tracking will show once it's been delivered

 

That, my friend, is the same conclusion I have come too. It's give or take the same price but big plus as you say it's tracked!

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Thanks for that, I've had a look where my nearest collect+ is.

 

Meanwhile buyer opened a case and asked for his money back.  In PayPal I received £15.03, the refund has taken out £15.20. Somewhere along the lines I've lost 17p, or 2 miles fuel cost in the F10.

 

Fingers burnt and lesson learned!

 

Thanks for the advice lads.

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Today after initially contacting RM in September and again a couple of weeks ago to chase this up, a cheque for £18.62 landed on my door mat.

 

Royal Mail can't explain why it didn't drop but are going to continue to investigate the delivery side of things.

 

So I've got a result but my feelings are mixed on it.

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11 minutes ago, Too late said:

Even if you send recorded .A scammer will either claim "fake item"  "package empty " etc etc .  And you kiss the money goodbye 

 

Its just not worth the pain. 

Ask them to return the item to you. Because if they've put in an ebay or a paypal claim, they will get the  purchase price back anyway. And if you can physically get the item, you can look into the matter further and decide what to do next. For example, if the returned item is in fact the same thing you posted, you can sell it again, assuming it's not damaged, but if what they send you back is not what you posted, you can either report it to plod as a fraud / attempt to obtain money by deception, or make a civil claim against paypal, on the basis you now have neither your property, or the money they've returned to the buyer.

Edited by 12quidkidinnit

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37 minutes ago, Too late said:

Thats why local facebook groups and Gumtree is so popular 

 

But I'm not going to sell all my geeky model railway stuff that way. :D I need the wider appeal of t'interweb for selling all my unwanted Hornby stuff!

 

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I won a dispute as a seller, just make sure your listing is clear cut, also state no returns on listing if it's something to be posted, make sure it's clear on the listing too.

 

i sold some diesel pezio injectors recently, I bought them working in good faith, I never fitted them and they stayed wrapped up for over a year, I sold them stating that I had bought them as working but hadn't tested them, I also mentioned that they where being sold with no returns, I priced them at about spares and repairs value and also took a hit on the offer, £30 iirc they went for, one bloke tried to claim both where to be sold for £30 even though it never mentioned that two where included in the price, also the listing had a quantity of two.

 

The next buyer tried to say his was leaking when tested, now I know pezio injectors need testing on a proper bosch machine this machine should give a print out of the injector which he never offered to show me, I mentioned that I stipulated no returns on the listing and never said they definitely work, I also mentioned the price was low because they where a gamble, I was polite and just put my reasonings across why he won't get a refund, PayPal held the money for the given time and I eventually got reimbursed the full amount again and they obviously sided with me.

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I sold a stereo for a seat leon recently bit had no radio code. The title explicitly said "no code" and I even re confirmed this in the listing description.

Had also procedures it cheaply compared to other stereos on ebay that had the code.

Buyer purchased it and 3 days later sent me a message to say there was no code and a picture via eBay messages of the stereo in the car asking for a code.

I told him it was all on the listing so I had fine nothing wrong and not my fault if he didn't read it before purchasing.

I said he is welcome to return it to me as I could resell it but he would have to cover the return postage cost.

No contact for 2 days then an email from paypal saying there is a dispute with the transaction.

Instead of the buyer trying to fudge the issue about the code or claiming the stereo was faulty he had actually gone tk his bank to reverse the payment claiming item was never ordered or received and that he had not authorised this payment to leave his account.

I immediately rang paypal and without being rude told them how sneaky this was and they totally agreed. They asked for proof of delivery so I sent them a screenshot of the hermes website showing item as delivered and they immediately refunded my money.

The thing is that if he had opened an ebay case against me then I would have had to accept the return with him covering return postage costs as I am am ebay business seller but as he tried to do it the shifty way it backfired on him.

Motto of the story is that most times paypal and ebay do side with the buyer but once in a blue moon they do show common sense

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Basically Royal Mail are crap. 

From the postman to the overall service it's all crap. 

 

I once ordered an item where the seller sent it via 'RM Signed for' service and RM managed to lose it at the depot. 

 

I did get a refund from the seller but RM we're useless 

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When I'm selling on eBay, I accept that the costs are what they are, and I pay for the massive exposure I get.

I make extensive use of the buyer restrictions - to the maximum possible levels. No newbies, no negs etc.

I also take detailed pics of the item, before, during and after packing. And a note of the parcel weight. Then post using recorded delivery - always - and special delivery if valuable.

You're never going to be 100% safe, but you can do a lot to avoid the worst.

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44 minutes ago, Calypso-E34 said:

 

When I'm selling on eBay, I accept that the costs are what they are, and I pay for the massive exposure I get.

 

I make extensive use of the buyer restrictions - to the maximum possible levels. No newbies, no negs etc.

 

I also take detailed pics of the item, before, during and after packing. And a note of the parcel weight. Then post using recorded delivery - always - and special delivery if valuable.

 

You're never going to be 100% safe, but you can do a lot to avoid the worst.

 

Depending on what you're selling there might be some mileage in looking at either the invisible watermark products, or if it's for arguments sake a car module for something that can easily be opened, a tamper proof/numbered sticker on the inside with your business name on. I know a couple of places that now do this after having items returned as faulty (and the subsequent refund to them from PayPal) only to find the item they received back wasn't the one they posted out! 

 

I've been bitten by similar in work. I now put an anti tamper sticker (one of the ones that breaks into little pieces) on the edges of ECU cases where the lid meets the body of the ECU. I know then that if it comes back with a broken seal someone has been in it since me.

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On 07 March 2017 at 7:25 AM, Too late said:

Fake items, you are often told NOT to return.Or you have to send them to the manufacture etc to be "Validated" etc . A item that is missing CANNOT be returned . A swapped item CAN be returned . One thing is for sure.Paypal will just about always give the buyer their money back .

Yes, I noticed it suggests not returning certain items. However, if you end up without your goods or your money, then as long as you can establish with a fair degree of certainty that the item was delivered, you are entitled to claim, either against the buyer, or paypal, or both. If the item has been lost by a courier, you could of course claim from them.

 

One issue with alleged 'fake' items is that whilst you may have sent out a genuine item, you have no way of knowing whether the one sent to be 'validated' is the one you sent, or a different one. Imagine selling a Rolex watch, sending it off, special delivery. A dishonest buyer receives it, then substitutes a Chinese fake, alleges this is the one you sent him, and when it's checked, it will look like he's telling the truth.

 

There are many tricks that get pulled on ebay and other selling sites. I remember being told about a guy a few years ago who used to buy cheap,  faulty but current model mobile phones. Then he would buy a brand new one of the same model, swap the faulty internals into it, and return it as faulty, for a refund. This resulted him him having a good working phone which he could use or sell on. The tamper proof labels mentioned in another post would be a good way of stopping people like that. You can't guard against everything, but it's worth being aware of as many of the pitfalls as possible, so you can decide what the risks are, and what to do if the worst does happen.

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