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Collective-friction

New bloke with E12 M535i

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IMG_0803_zpskxkpdxjp.jpgWell M5 was right, the diff bolts were indeed 10.9 high tensile offerings so I will leave those alone just in case. The rest are all ok so have sent those off. A few more visits to the dealer have happened and whilst I don't mind paying through gritted teeth some of the frankly daft prices for bits and bobs, I just couldnt bring myself to pay 30 quid plus the vat for the little paper gasket that fits below the diff breather. So I made one from some gasket paper I had loafing about. 

Edited by Collective-friction

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I managed to sneak off for a couple of hours to get some work done on the car. I wanted to have a poke about and treat any corrosion I could find. This will be done over a couple of sittings so that I can take my time. Anything that looked suspicious got a good going over with my ever faithful knotwheel followed by two coats of hydrate 80. I will cover that with POR 15 followed by a light coat of UC. I'm not after anything like a show finish so am not aiming to replicate the underseal applied by the factory, but more of a sympathetic clean up that will allow me to spot any reoccurrence quickly rather than let anything fester under today's underseal offerings that are really tough. 

 

The main spots were around the body bungs and we have all seen how bad these can get if left so I cleaned these up first. These pictures are representative of the other small areas I found so you get the idea. Thankfully nothing more than surface corrosion found which was a big relief. 

 

 

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Of course the trouble with cleaning as I go means that it doesn't take much for other components to look tired. With one eye on doing right buy the car and one on not getting too carried away from both a usability and financial perspective, some more stuff arrived in the post :blink:

 

IMG_0819_zpsthb02ubw.jpg

 

 

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If you keep going at this rate you might end up spending as much as me on an e12 M535i.https://shop.bmw-classic.com/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/WFS/Classic-ClassicDE-Site/en_EU/-/EUR/ViewStandardCatalog-Browse;pgid=XsFgCXFuiy1SR0QXJYojPjIT0000OauA49Xh;sid=vt839OyPK56P8LWNnTYcrt4vf45ciiUciEI=?CatalogID=Shop&CategoryName=SEARCH_AUTOMOBILE

 

I am an addict and keep giving them more and more money. The gasket and many parts are cheaper than BMW dealer. Prices are in Euro and free delivery with orders above €75 are free. 

Don't get addicted and leave some parts for other people

 

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You can't say that and not post a picture of your car! 

 

Thanks for the link, I have used them for some parts, although of late my local dealer has clearly taken pity on me and given me a good discount. 

 

It  is addictive as you say, but I only intend on doing this once so there will be plenty of spares left for other E12's!

 

The biggest challenge I have ( notwithstanding justifying the expense of course) is knowing where to stop, I'm certainly not after a concourse finish and I'm definitely not going to be parked in a field with mirrors under it but I will do right by the car. 

 

I'll hopefully get some car time this weekend and tackle the next couple of bits of surface corrosion. I got the bushes out the trailing arms this week so once the wheel bearings are out they can go off to the powder coaters.

 

Anyone have a source/ alternative for the plastic brake pipe clips that slot onto the trailing arm? NLA by all accounts.

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I finished the diff off today. When I took it out most of the sweating was around the breather so keen to not have to ever have to take it out again I looked about for a suitable jointing compound to use with my homemade gasket. A mate of mine restores motorbikes and said he had some stuff that he uses to seal up leaky old British bikes called Wellseal, in fact he said it's the only thing that seals up leaky old British bikes  . So on it went.

That coupled with a new o-ring in the vent pipe and it was done.

 

Obligatory before and after

 

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That is very nice work. I think the way you are going about it is the way to do it. Do it in manageable sections so that the car is not off the road for long periods. I stripped my car to a shell and it means that you lose interest and it keeps being put on the back of the line of things to do. Going to far is stripping the diff and replacing clutch and disc parts of the Lsd new bearings and seals. That is why I do not have a car, just a large collection of parts which are in boxes.

Keep it on the road and enjoy it.

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Thanks M5, to be honest it's more luck than judgment that it's turned out this way since I only first envisioned changing the fuel pipes! The issue I always had with the car was that the rear beam, trailing arms etc really let the side down, whilst devoid of any serious corrosion it was obviously an area that have not received any real attention it it's life. I spent the last two years trying to convince myself I could live with it and failed.

I totally understand how you have ended up in your situation as I've done the same with another car many years ago. In fact having the time to get on the car and continue with what is effectively a bounded project is still really tricky at times in an attempt to balance family life. So much so in fact I sold a car this weekend to free up the level of commitment for exactly that reason.

 

i will miss it too but it is what it is.

 

E30 320is, rot free, shrink cams, carbon airbox, a proper little screamer. Still it's gone to a good mate not too far away so will see it from time to time. Needless to say I've achieved nothing on the E12!  A few pictures if of any interest. 

 

 

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It really was a cracker and a full engine build less than 3k miles ago. Most importantly it was rot free and was an absolute screamer to drive. It would live with my M3 all day long engine wise but was arguably more engaging/clenchy :) on account of the slow rack and brakes from the 325i that they run. Come to think of it I probably let it go a little too cheaply!! 

 

In other news, I've had the rear beam, brake backing plates and exhaust bracket back from the powdercoaters and....well....they look pants. By which I mean the finish is good, the blasting has taken care of all the surface rust but they are far too shiny and I mean far too shiny! My fault of course and not the powdercoaters ( who just rolled his eyes!) so that lot has all gone back to be done again in proper satin this time. 

 

I collected one one of the last bags of bits from the dealer including wheel bearings and brake pipes so the next job is to get the bearings out of the trailing arms and send them off. All the while of course the preparation of the boot floor continues.

 

Hopefully next time I'll have some progress in pictures. 

Edited by Collective-friction

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wtf. I recently went to the dealer for rear wheel bearings for mine and was told NLA. Ended up sourcing some genuine bearings from Europe. Gonna ask you to get my bits from now on!

Edited by Joss

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That's odd mate, there was no mention of them being NLA. Having said that when I picked them up interestingly (or not!) I noticed that they are sealed bearings where I assumed the original ones are were not as my manual says the bearings need greasing on installation. Presumably they are a superseded part and that's why they showed up as NLA ?

 

Here they are..

 

IMG_0836_zps6f0l5syl.jpg

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In between getting fed up lying on my back with a knotwheel on a grinder I decided to break the monotony by playing with some new stuff. 

 

As as you can see the original fuel pump was looking a bit manky, quite corroded and all the rubber bobbins naturally fell apart as I removed it. So rather than messing about and mindful that I didn't want to be revisiting the area for some time I handed over a bundle of cash at my increasingly familiar and welcoming dealer and came home with shiny bits. All, that is apart from the rediculously priced fuel pump which I got elsewhere from Bosch for considerably less. 

 

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