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Write offs...

16 posts in this topic

Could it be flood damaged? Or perhaps it was stolen/recovered? Write off's aren't clear cut any more, confuses me anyway. 

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Usually a write off means the cost of repairs and associalmted expense is more than 50% of the vehicle value. This will be the trade value of the vehicle so a lot less than half of that sale price. It will also include a hire car etc - and new panels instead of second hand panels etc. It all easily starts to add up - especially when the insurance companies value a hire car at £65 a day!

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Probably stolen/recovered. Insurance paid out before it was found so the marker stays. Just my guess. Full hpi will show.

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The hire car part can make a big difference.

Couple of years ago someone hit a colleagues 08 M3 and refused to accept liability for it.

This dragged it on as my colleagues insurance wouldn't authorise the repair work until the other driver accepted responsibility, all the while providing a like for like replacement hire vehicle, as you can imagine the hire costs for a M3 will rack up fast.

End result was the car was 1 week away from being written off for what wasn't much actual damage.

It's worth noting that the category write off tags in auto trader are automatic based on the reg entered in the advert, which is why sometimes there is no mention of the damage/reason for being written off.

Edited by Treles

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As said above, Cat D is damage amounting to over 50% of the vehicle's trade value. The insurance companies replace everything with OEM parts and add in the cost of a good quality respray and it soon adds up.

 

As an example my little fender bender the other week is likely to cost my insurers in excess of a grand, despite there being little or no visible damage to either car. Arnold Clark will not fill or straighten panels and as such said the other car needs a new bumper and respray to adjoining panels to blend it in. 

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So many cat C's and D's about. I have just got a new car for the wife, I was shocked how many seem to be about these days. Unless we are all just more aware than we used to be 10 years or so ago.

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I wouldn't worry about them as much unless you are buying a car that was over 40-50k new. A Cat D for a brand new car could mean substantial damage. A Cat D for a car that is 5-10 years old could be nothing more than a scrape

 

The old Saab story comes to mind, was a top spec 2005 Saab 9-3 Aero which was a Cat D because the previous owner ripped the bottom splitter off and because Saab no longer exist, it was going to cost a fortune apparently

 

Unfortunately its going to get harder as VIC checks are no longer required for cat C which means some dealers could easily hide bodged repairs. 

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A vic check never checked the repairs, it could of been as shoddy as you like, all it ever checked was the vehicles identity, hence the name vehicle identity check, Sam

Sent from my LG-V500 using Tapatalk

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 Regarding hire cars, I refused to have one when my 535i was hit as I thought that might tip things over the edge cost wise and write the car off, I'm glad I did now reading this!

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A vic check never checked the repairs, it could of been as shoddy as you like, all it ever checked was the vehicles identity, hence the name vehicle identity check, Sam

Sent from my LG-V500 using Tapatalk

Yep, for some reason people think a VIC is a guarantee that repairs have been carried out to a suitable standard, it's actually just VOSA's way of making sure the collar and cuffs match and you aren't driving a cut and shut or a ringer.

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Yep, for some reason people think a VIC is a guarantee that repairs have been carried out to a suitable standard, it's actually just VOSA's way of making sure the collar and cuffs match and you aren't driving a cut and shut or a ringer.

Yep and I of all people thought that too.

Learn something new every day haha.

Going to write some lines now...

"A vic check is useless"

"A vic check is useless"

Jam

Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk

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Yep and I of all people thought that too.

Learn something new every day haha.

Going to write some lines now...

"A vic check is useless"

"A vic check is useless"

Jam

Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk

Wasn't aimed at you Jam, it's a common misconception, but a VIC check was compulsory if you were putting a registered CAT D or C car back on the road, they charged you £45 just to look at the engine and chassis numbers to make sure they tallied.

 

The GOOD NEWS is they scrapped it in October 2015 and a VIC check is no longer required https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-identity-check 

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Wasn't aimed at you Jam, it's a common misconception, but a VIC check was compulsory if you were putting a registered CAT D or C car back on the road, they charged you £45 just to look at the engine and chassis numbers to make sure they tallied.

The GOOD NEWS is they scrapped it in October 2015 and a VIC check is no longer required https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-identity-check

No no... I've taken it purely to heart and I'm still sat writing my lines haha.

Jam

Sent from my HTC One M9 using Tapatalk

pauliexjr likes this

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