Jump to content
F10 530d

What did you do to your F07/F10/F11 today?

Recommended Posts

32 minutes ago, 535i Andrew said:

 

 

You boys and your fancy F11 with square set up wheel sizes, means you can swap tyres around.  I haven't owned a car for over 10 years that I could swap front to rear and vice versa.

 

Come now Andrew, I thought we determined earlier today that F11s are just the best?! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, 535i Andrew said:

 

I think this is now a load of old tosh from back in the days before before ESP and the like was fitted to cars.

 

As for Kwik Fit's advice that part work tyres are more likely to get punctures well that really is the biggest LOB I've read in a long time, the most likely tyres to get punctured are those on the rear due to the fact that the front tyres flick up screws/nails and they then get stabbed into the following rear tyre. Other than kerbing 95% of punctures are on the rear tyres which as the manager of a sizeable fleet of vehicles I can vouch for through first hand experience so with this in mind I always put the better tyres on the front of my cars, nothing worse than spending £200 on a tyre then a week later getting a screw through it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, DickieG said:

As for Kwik Fit's advice that part work tyres are more likely to get punctures well that really is the biggest LOB I've read in a long time, 

 

Disagree. Most punctures I've had are on well worn tyres where the tread can't do its job of shedding small screws and nails before the get a chance to inflict damage. Bigger screws or nails will still go thru the tyre regardless of tread depth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DickieG said:

 

I think this is now a load of old tosh from back in the days before before ESP and the like was fitted to cars.

 

As for Kwik Fit's advice that part work tyres are more likely to get punctures well that really is the biggest LOB I've read in a long time, the most likely tyres to get punctured are those on the rear due to the fact that the front tyres flick up screws/nails and they then get stabbed into the following rear tyre. Other than kerbing 95% of punctures are on the rear tyres which as the manager of a sizeable fleet of vehicles I can vouch for through first hand experience so with this in mind I always put the better tyres on the front of my cars, nothing worse than spending £200 on a tyre then a week later getting a screw through it.

Surely you just get a puncture repair done? £10 and 30 mins of your life wasted! I had to do this yesterday on my wife’s car, no brainier versus £200 on a new tyre which typically isn’t in stock either. BTW our puncture was OSF.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both times I've had tyres condemned due to cuts that have gone through to the steel/nylon belts they have been mounted on the front axle. Never had a puncture so can't comment. This isn't just about punctures though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sshooie said:

I'd be interested in your evidence for the rear punctures, surely there's a train of similar logic that the front tyre passes over the object first and takes the hit?

 

My evidence is based upon personal experience of being responsible for a fleet of 140+ vehicles over several years and being the person who deals with the repairs to them.

 

Re your point of about the front tyre passing over the object, how many screws, nails or CO2 cylinders (I’ve had several of those puncture rear tyres) do you see standing upright? It’s the front tyre flicking the object upwards as it passes over it that allows it to penetrate the rear tyre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 535i Andrew said:

 

Disagree. Most punctures I've had are on well worn tyres where the tread can't do its job of shedding small screws and nails before the get a chance to inflict damage. Bigger screws or nails will still go thru the tyre regardless of tread depth.

 

Interesting point but as a worn tyre can only realistically have 4-5mm more tread then a brand new one it’s difficult to believe that such a small difference will have any real effect on the outcome. If however you’re talking about a tyre on a vehicle of 3.5 ton upwards where a new tyre will have a significant difference in tread depth from a worn one then yes I’d agree with you, especially as I have several of those on the fleet I look after and have removed sizeable screws/bolts from such vehicles. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bigshout said:

Surely you just get a puncture repair done? £10 and 30 mins of your life wasted! I had to do this yesterday on my wife’s car, no brainier versus £200 on a new tyre which typically isn’t in stock either. BTW our puncture was OSF.

 

Yes you can depending upon the location of the puncture in relation to the tyre width, however have you tried getting a run flat repaired? Very few tyre depots will repair them giving all manner of reasons why you must replace the tyre, however provided the tyre hasn’t been driven whilst flat they are just as repairable as any other tyre. Once a run flat has been used in a flat state the tyre walls break up which clearly makes it dangerous to repair. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, DickieG said:

 

Yes you can depending upon the location of the puncture in relation to the tyre width, however have you tried getting a run flat repaired? Very few tyre depots will repair them giving all manner of reasons why you must replace the tyre, however provided the tyre hasn’t been driven whilst flat they are just as repairable as any other tyre. Once a run flat has been used in a flat state the tyre walls break up which clearly makes it dangerous to repair. 

All very good points, another reason why I shy away from run flats. I live in London so I’m never more than a mile or so away from a tyre dealer and always have a 12v tyre inflator in the boot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, DickieG said:

Once a run flat has been used in a flat state the tyre walls break up which clearly makes it dangerous to repair. 

 

That's the thing though, there is no visual cue to indicate that they've been run flat, is there?

 

Local tyre place won't fit a good RFT ive got spare, for the same reason. 

 

Guess it's a big risk buying a used car with RFT already fitted.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, DickieG said:

 

My evidence is based upon personal experience of being responsible for a fleet of 140+ vehicles over several years and being the person who deals with the repairs to them.

 

Re your point of about the front tyre passing over the object, how many screws, nails or CO2 cylinders (I’ve had several of those puncture rear tyres) do you see standing upright? It’s the front tyre flicking the object upwards as it passes over it that allows it to penetrate the rear tyre.

 

So no real evidence then, just personal experience. 

 

Ref placing new tyres on the rear, it's advice lots of real specialist give,  organisations like the AA and RAC etc. I think I'll stick with their advice. 

Edited by sshooie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, sshooie said:

Ref placing new tyres on the rear, it's advice lots of real specialist give,  organisations like the AA and RAC etc. 

 

And after reading up on it thanks to the prompts I learned on here from more knowledgeable others.  

 

16 minutes ago, sshooie said:

I think I'll stick with their advice. 

 

too

Edited by 535i Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, bmwmike said:

 

That's the thing though, there is no visual cue to indicate that they've been run flat, is there?

 

Local tyre place won't fit a good RFT ive got spare, for the same reason. 

 

Guess it's a big risk buying a used car with RFT already fitted.

 

 

 

Hi,

 

If a tyre has been driven on while flat the signs are normally on the inside of the tyre. Here is a pic I managed to find as an example, it's even an RFT.

 

Any decent tyre place will be able to determine if the tyre can be repaired and should follow the manufacturer's guidelines.

 

Thanks

 

Paul

RFT_tire_interior_sidewall.jpg

Edited by PaulBMW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Changed the front anti roll bar links due to knocking noises over rough surfaces, ended up breaking 2 of my T40 sockets trying to undo them. They're not torqued that high so was surprising. had to use vice grips on the boot side which was not recommended but got away without damaging the new ones

 

IMG_20180211_171825.thumb.jpg.f04502ade1fef272467ff359e58b13ff.jpg IMG_20180211_171831.thumb.jpg.dd01e8f693943927a477e57c85100d19.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by IINexusII

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×