Seabass

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About Seabass

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ayrshire, Scotland

Garage

  • Garage
    BMW 535d
  1. The Eibach Sportlines in Bob's pic look like a good drop if you are running standard wheels. I'm running 19 inch X5 wheels which are 9 inches wide up front and 10 inches wide in the rear so I wanted to keep a little arch room to run the correct size tyres, I don't care for stretched tyres on wide wheels.
  2. If you put your car details in eurocarparts it will tell you the kit options and how much it will lower it by. I think I went for the 35mm kit however it's worth noting that I think the lowering amount they quote is based on standard spring height (SE model) so if you are already on sport springs then it won't lower as much. I think Eibach do a Sportline spring kit that will take you lower but I wasn't willing to go that far as I felt it would ruin the compliant ride too much for a road car. If you are looking for extreme lowering or to be able to change it to your liking you might be better looking at a coilover kit.
  3. Eurocar Parts do H&R kits at a reasonable price, even better if you get them while a discount code is running. They're a good brand and I'm happy with how much they have lowered my 535d Sport, it's noticeably lower than when it was on the standard sport springs but not too low as to cause issues with day to day items like speed bumps or kerbs. They are noticeably stiffer but have retained the original ride quality which is nice.
  4. Hey Tristan, your modball pics look awesome. What's your thoughts on the AP coilovers now you've spent some time with them and how do they compare to the standard M-Sport suspension set up? I'm at a crossroads on what to do for my suspension refresh so some feedback from you on your set up would be much appreciated given the journey you've just undertaken.
  5. The resistors, etc aren't needed, they were part of the torch battery charging circuitry. If your device is expecting a 12v input then you can solder straight to the prongs as the other Chris has done. I just mentioned that I had problems getting the solder wire I had to fix securely to the back of them, may be due to poor quality solder wire. After an hour of having one connector disconnect as I soldered the other one on I then decided to de-solder all the resistors from the PCB and use the relevant holes they leave to thread through the new wires then solder these to the PCB which worked a treat, nice and secure. Cheers, Chris
  6. Hi Stu, I've just built one of these yesterday. If you have the torch apart you should be able to see which prong is positive and which is negative by looking at where the connections run to the positive and negative terminals of the batteries inside. As the prongs aren't centred in the plastic body the best way I can describe polarities is that the prong closest to the centre of the body is negative and the prong closest to the side of the body is positive. Hope that makes sense? Personally I found that my solder didn't stick very well directly to the prongs as shown in the above pictures. I found it easier to de-solder the resistors, etc from the PCB then feed the new wires through the relevant holes left on the PCB then solder to these. Cheers, Chris
  7. Hi, could you please provide me with a quote for the Main Thermostat and EGR Thermostat for my 2004 535d vin B890213? Could you also please provide me with a price for a pair of rear brake discs please? Thanks and regards, Chris