M5 London

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Everything posted by M5 London

  1. Looks GREAT mate !
  2. Great video again.....as usual from you !
  3. This ^^
  4. Well it seems most suspension / steering arms have been renewed, which is great ! Maybe thoroughly flush the old pas fluid out and replace with new fluid, and if you fancy replace the actual pas reservoir, which contains a filter within it. PAS pumps seem to be generally strong .....but is something to check out. PAS lines are very poor and always leak, even new ones. So check all of them ! Also check for fault codes as sometimes servotronic fault comes up, but you should be able to feel that whilst steering....goes pretty heavy if the servotronic sensor fails.
  5. OK fair enough ! If installed correctly and are Lemforder they should be good for 50K miles I'd say... There is an argument that new bushes are useless unless the ball joints on the other end are good too....just a thought. Only other things to look at are the suspension geometry, lower control arms, suspension (dampers, springs, top mounts) and steering arms, anti roll bar drop links and anti roll bar bushes. Can you elaborate on the vagueness ? How did your last tyres wear ? Also how many miles on the car ? Steering box may need a rebuild if at mega miles. Thrust arms that are weak are responsible for steering wheel judder under braking mainly, but they do help locate the position of wheel/hub during cornering etc etc Also do not overlook the rear axle components....rear ball joints, guiding links, rear wishbones, subframe bushes, snapped rear anti roll bar brackets...'vagueness up front' could well be a rear end issue. PS : Vague at times may also suggest pas pump issues.
  6. Personally I'd avoid poly bushes on a road car especially on a bush that is designed to be strong in one axis of loading direction and soft in the perpendicular axis of loading direction. Did you change the whole arm, thus the ball joint at the other end too or not? Also it's quite common to fit the bush in an incorrect position (opposite orientation) AND also many people tighten up the bush when the it's not loaded i.e. with wheels on the ground and the bush / arms fully loaded. Also what are the exact symptoms you are experiencing ?
  7. Yep ! Oh dear, same here then too ! Glad my daily drivers, which I use to go into the CC Zone, are exempt
  8. Nice one Alex ! One of the coolest cars ever built by BMW !
  9. Just on another note, do your best to torque the sensor up evenly as possible so the gasket seats well and evenly....have heard several stories of ongoing oil leaks after replacing this sensor.
  10. Ask them to send you 8 Litres of oil too
  11. I believe I used the Hella Web catalogue as stated by Jake above. Got the same Article Number as stated above too : 6PR007868-031 Then found it through these suppliers (who are still doing them but for £76.60) : http://www.incarmotorfactors.co.uk/en/search?controller=search&orderby=position&orderway=desc&search_query=6PR+007+868-031&submit_search= Also these are the details of my original purchase back in August 2014 : 6PR007868-031 Hella Oil Level Sensor £68.40 1 £68.40 Products £68.40 Discounts £0.00 Gift-wrapping £0.00 Shipping £1.50 Total Tax paid £11.40 Total paid £69.90
  12. Seems quite a capable performer....the new M5 :
  13. I remember buying a genuine Hella item but it was about £70 from a Motor factor. It worked fine.
  14. They look good (the bottom two rows in both columns (each engine bank)). Also do your top two rows in both columns actually fluctuate when viewing them (voltage should be switching)
  15. Yes same as resetting adaptations. Have you given us your fuel trim values yet at all? Yep when I changed out my vanos solenoid boards back in 2008 I had no idea about the trick......Having said that I don't think many people even understood that vanos solenoids were an issue and ended up replacing complete vanon units.
  16. 128 L/H before the limiter is not too bad. You really need to reset all fuel trims and go for it, or allow a few hundred miles. You should slam into the limiter, but fair enough if you don't want to, but it has to hit the limiter. Also as others have mentioned better to get a passenger to read the highest actual number, as the driver sometimes does not see the peak value.....ask me how I know. There is also some document out there that shows some compensation for these peak L/H per numbers, which compensate for altitude, ambient temps etc etc I believe. So a reading of 130 L/H may equate to 140 once compensated by the above document. The trick with removing Vanos Solenoid is to unscrew the hex bolts a few revs, then crank the engine over in neutral (do not let it start, just roll the starter for a couple of milliseconds) and hey presto the Vanos Solenoids have been released from their tight seal, and when you remove all hex securing bolts, the board should now be free.
  17. Refurbishing the Vanos Solenoids is very straight forward. No need to remove the VANOS units themselves. However doing these at some point is wise. So are the timing guides, tensioner and chain. So are the rod bearings. I have never heard of VANOS unit self destructing at all so for me there is no urgency with this. But I have heard of catastrophic damage due to timing guides giving up and also rod bearings being spun.... If it was my car I would swap Bank 1 Vanos Solenoid with Bank 2 and see if the codes follow to the next bank. If they do you can follow some online guides to inspect all the solder joints, remove any debris from the failed gauze filters etc and make sure all oil squirters are unblocked. Then re fit and things should feel a lot better. What's the mileage on the car ? For CPS sensors, the exhaust ones are easier from the top. I did the exhaust CPSs myself and I am no mechanic. A mini ratchet set is handy as the bolts are quite long from memory and with the limited space you don't want to keep realigning an allen key or similar tool about a 100 times for the required revs.... The intakes are easier from underneath, having said that I got Phil to do them for me, and he did the Intakes from the top, but he is a bit of whizz with these cars.
  18. I have been off the boil with E39 M5s since about 2012 or so, but from memory those Decimal codes, which translate to Hexadecimal codes of 8 = 08 and 113 = 71, are Intake Camshaft Position Sensor Cyl #5-8 AND Intake Camshaft VANOS position control Cyl #5-8 which suggest to me its more likely a Vanos Solenoid issue rather than a CPS issue. I think the clue, deep in my memory somewhere, is suggesting if you don't have a code that stated there is a Crankshaft/Camshaft position correlation Cyl #1-4 or #5-8 error, then CPS are ok and look into Vanos Solenoids. Above diagnosis from memory. Having said that if the car is a keeper changing all 4 CPS is a good idea, especially if originals. Vanos solenoids usually need a overhaul, if never touched previously, and are quite easily done. Solder joints crack and sometimes debris gets stuck in the solenoid oil squirt holes too. Lots of info on all of the above on the famous M5 specialist forum. E Box Fan - Easy replacement part, or have a look at it and service it. Some people ignore this code. I wouldn't. Secondary Air Valve Stuck 171 = AB is not as common as Secondary Air system, flow too low code 170 = AA. I wouldn't worry too much about this for now.
  19. Exhaust CPS are easy....intakes are a bit of a fiddle ! Well worth changing these critical engine sensors. Also they saw an update during their life and the originals are definitely the older design. What were your INPA fault codes please ?
  20. +1 ! Stock bolts are more than up for the job
  21. Nice car ! Welcome !
  22. Yep looking forward to photos for sure ! I believe the fuel return is by the fuel pressure regulator. Any excess fuel is returned at this point back to the tank, rather than making it any closer to the fuel injector rail. See #5 on here : http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR-09-1999-E39-BMW-M5&diagId=16_0436 See the base of the fuel pressure regulator housing #3 on here. Its where #5 from above diagram connects to : http://www.realoem.com/bmw/enUS/showparts?id=DE92-EUR-09-1999-E39-BMW-M5&diagId=13_0819
  23. What is your question exactly please ? Vacuum source for fuel pressure regulation is from the bank 2 row of throttle bodies.
  24. Great post ! Looking forward to your thread !
  25. These are the reasons why you feel that your ECU is faulty ?? I highly doubt its your ECU that's faulty. Engine oil level / temp sensor is at the bottom of your oil pan. Water temp sensor is on your Thermostat. Its a dual sensor, one signal for the instrument cluster temp gauge and one signal to the ECU for the fuelling data set. But it also used to give an oil temp indication to the instrument cluster gauge, if the engine oil level sensor is faulty. If I remember correctly. When this sensor connector is dirty or loose you see strange water temp and oil temp readings (if the oil level sensor is faulty at the same time). Remove the connector and check out the connection quality. Also its very easy and cheap to replace this important sensor. The engine oil level sensor is also known for failing at some point, and will eternally suggest you have low engine oil when you switch off the engine. What fault codes is your car showing ?