RichardP

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Everything posted by RichardP

  1. A quick internal examination of the old oil tank indicates that it was a good idea to replace it! I need to get a better endoscope to do a more thorough examination.
  2. So, at last, after the best part of a year, I finally have my M1 at home! After keeping my eye out for a long time for an M1 I found one in July last year that looked like it fitted the bill. As with many M1’s the car history is not fully known, but it was first supplied by BMW leasing to an address in Munich in 1980 and from there found its way to Switzerland from where it was imported to the UK, but not registered, in 2011. Mechanically the car is in very good condition, there are some cosmetic rubber components that are not 100%, but replacements for most M1 parts are very difficult to find. The engine is not the original, the engine number on the block does not match up with the number it should, it’s not even the correct format! However, it appears that the engine is of a higher performance than standard. There was a company that tuned M1 engines, it’s possible that this is one of these. The car was also fitted with a stainless steel silencer. The car was originally white, at some point had been painted silver and then painted white again. The last repaint was done by a company that specialised in building luxury fibre glass yachts and they have done a very good job of painting the fibre glass body. The interior was originally black leather and cloth but, possibly when painted silver, had been re-trimmed in red leather with red carpets. I believe that the dash had also been covered red, but this had been reverted to black because of reflections on the windscreen. The interior had been done very well, but I wanted to return it to as close to original as possible. Also, the way the carpet had been done it was difficult to use the accelerator without hitting the brake, unless you had very narrow feet!! This is what it looked like when I bought it. Sourcing the materials required to restore it to its original appearance took much, much longer than I anticipated. The seat cloth is unique to the M1 but I managed to find a source in Germany and bought 4 sq m plus a genuine roof panel which is covered in the same material (the roof had been covered red too). The leather used in the M1 has finish that is difficult to replicate, you can get close but not exactly the same using widely available leather. Again I managed to source some of the original leather, a total of 18 sq m was needed, 4 full hides. I also found a genuine new hand brake lever and handle and a new gear knob. The backs of the seats are covered in a black tweed like cloth, this proved very difficult to find something that looked identical and impossible to find the original material. Eventually I managed to find some material that was a pretty close match. The carpets turned out to be very frustrating. There are 9 pieces of carpet, two floor pieces, 2 wheel arch pieces, two pieces down each side of the transmission tunnel (4 in all) and a piece at the back. I managed to find 5 genuine pieces of the 9 pieces required, but the material is impossible to replicate. In the end I had to settle for a reasonable colour match high quality carpet, it’s probably much better quality than the original, but I was a little disappointed that I could not use the genuine stuff. Other miscellaneous parts that were required were a replacement radio (which currently does not work!), a brand new set of original floor mats (which need to be fastened down somehow as they currently slide right under the pedals!), a genuine replacement rear silencer and twin black tail pipes, replacement rear window seal, black flock finish centre cubby hole (the original had been covered red), leather covered ash tray, a genuine rear ///M1 decal (from the USA), new wheel centre caps with the old BMW logo and I even found an original unused M1 English instruction manual. I also found a genuine new mph speedometer, the original kph speedometer rear just 5055 when replaced, I don’t know if this is the original, it may have been replaced when the engine was replaced. A selection of hoses and gaskets and other odds and ends were obtained from BMW classic, I wasn’t sure if they would be needed or not but though it best to start building a spares bank just in case! I collected the car from Munich Legends on 1st July after they had given it a thorough inspection. I drove it to a Shell garage and back to fill up with V-Power, just enough to get the car good and hot. We then did a final inspection on the ramps to check for any leaks, remarkably there was nothing at all, dry as a bone, the ML techs said they had never seen an M1 with no leaks! I left ML to drive the car home just after midday, you might remember that 1st July was a rather hot day, my route took me clockwise round the M25 past Heathrow where the recorded temperature reached 36.7C! I was a little apprehensive to say the least, the temperature on the motorway was probably significantly higher, but the car did not miss a beat over the 275 mile trip. The air con is rather rudimentary, but it did its job, just! I’ve had the car up on ramps again since I got home, still pretty much bone dry, just a very small amount of sweating from a couple of places. Things left to do include: - Repair the radio - Repair the clock, some of the illuminated elements don’t work. - Find a way to anchor the floor mats. - Find a way to secure the spare wheel, there were two designs, the one that matches the main wheels can’t be fastened down using the supplied bolt! - Find a replacement left front indicator, it has a small crack, part NLA. - Find a replacement right window guide, it has a small cut, part NLA. - Find as many spare parts as possible! Finally, here are a couple of pictures as she is now, I'll add some more detailed pictures later.
  3. Indeed there is! I want to reduce the engine bay temperature, so a coating on the manifold would seem the best way. However, I'd also like to keep the original manifold which if you remember has some additional bracing near the flanges. So, the 'new' manifold will be coated leaving the original, original!
  4. Yes, it's under the floor. The unit on the right here You can unplug everything, except 3 wires that you have to cut and tape off. Plug the blue connector that was in the TM module into the TV (or Nav if you don;t have TV) otherwise the TV and Nav won't work.
  5. MOT passed, no problems. New oil tank installed and then this turned up
  6. I'm not making this a sticky thread and replacing the 6.02-7058 firmware as this build has not been tested as much as I'd like and there is no update to the user guide. The main reason for posting is for people to test a new feature that has required a reasonable amount of internal reorganisation which may introduce problems. The main area where problems may occur is when performing an action either via the menu or a key press. I've had to extend the number of possible actions that can take parameters (for example changing values can go up or down depending on the turn direction of the control wheel) so that they have actions and sub-actions. The firmware contains all changes that have been made for specific problems for all UIs plus the addition of the option to setup scroll parameters for field 0 text on the Nav screen. Scrolling hits the iBus pretty hard, particularly for UI6 where the text in field 0 can be quite long. I'd recommend a scroll speed of no more than 0.4 sec on a Mk IV nav using the Small font option and it would be best not to enable scrolling of both the Nav and High Cluster. Probably best to limit the number of repeats too. The scroll options are on the 'Setup Display' menu for the Full Screen Nav software and on the 'Text Size' menu (selected from the 'Setup Display' menu for the Split Screen Nav software. Here are a couple of videos of it working on a Rover Mk III and a Mk IV Nav, Field 0 has been set to show 'Now Playing'. The maximum length of the scrolling text is currently 64 characters. Please post any questions or problems in this thread, I'd also like to know who has tried it and with what components. I'll post an 'official' version with updated user guide in due course. fw-app-256 - extras V6.02-7109.zip
  7. I don't know how to get gearbox temperature over the iBus. It's possible there may be a diagnostic code for it, if it can be found then it can be implemented.
  8. Started improving the heat shielding in a couple of places. First, the top of the engine cover over the exhaust, there are just two small pieces of heat shielding on the larger beams After even quite a short drive the smaller parts were getting exceedingly hot. Far too hot to touch and hot enough for the fibre glass to become quite soft and floppy! You can see in the picture above that the paint was starting to discolour because of the heat. I bought some Zircoflex 3 self adhesive heat shield and applied a double layer, in theory that should reduce the temperature by about 75%. Next up was the bottom of the well for the toolkit. Basically nothing on the outside, even though it's right above the exhaust. There is a piece of heat shielding inside, between the fibreglass and carpet, but it's not surprising the toolkit gets very hot (if you look back, the handle of one of the screwdrivers melted!). I stuck a single layer of Zercoflex 3 on to it, the adhesion is not great due to the rough surface, but I squeezed it in the gap where the pop riveted rear part of the wheel arch liner is attached and that helps hold it on quite firmly and as the Zircoflex is quite stiff it should be OK I think. Finally I used the last of the half sheet of Zircoflex on part of the main chassis that is very close to the exhaust and has no heat shield. Next steps will be to remove the boot floor and partition between the boot and engine bay and put a layer of Zercoflex over the existing heat shield material. I'll probably need a couple of full sheets to do that. MOT time on Monday, after that an oil change and swap the original mild steel oil tank for the new stainless one. I've removed the forward rear wheel arch liner, the lower retaining piece and the gaiter around the filler pipe and dip stick in preparation.
  9. Probably related. The diagnostic device probably got confused by diagnostic messages coming from the Intravee. I've considered adding something that temporarily prevents the Intravee sending diag messages if it sees a diag message that it's not sent. If you can easily reproduce that behaviour, it would be good to try it out.
  10. When you enable extras again, run it for a while with all extras specifically disabled. Due to the way the light control message works, it needs to know various bits of information, like the cluster dimmer level. The only way to get these is to request them from the LCM every time the light status changes. So, with the latest build you may find that just enabling extras causes the problem again, even if you're not using anything. If that's the case I can change the code so that the status is only requested if anything is enabled that uses the status. It is odd that the EWS is reacting in this way, as the Intravee does not send anything to the EWS address. I'll be quite interested to see what's causing this.
  11. Disable extra features and use it like that for quite a while (10s of hours use) to ensure no problems. The items that create the most iBus diagnostic traffic are the lights. So you could then enable extras but disable everything individually. Then enable things slowly one by one.
  12. You need to connect to a PC and run the downloaded, then type the command welcome XXX Where XXX is the message up to 20 characters.
  13. 28th might be tricky, depends what the rest of the family are doing over half term, they may be going to visit my mother in law, in which case it will be OK.
  14. The part number is 51 13 1 961 243, they cost about £1 each from a dealer. The design has changed slightly so they are not identical to the originals, they hold the plate off the boot a little, maybe to allow trapped moisture to dry out.
  15. Pretty sure it's nothing as nice as a Pantera under there Dennis, it's a Fiber Craft Aquila Kit-Car based on a VW Beetle! http://oppositelock.kinja.com/fly-away-in-a-cheap-gullwing-equipped-vw-aquila-kit-car-1548862033
  16. I think it's still illegal to set fire to other peoples property, even in the USA.
  17. I am lost for words! https://newyork.craigslist.org/stn/cto/6078837919.html
  18. Yes, always like that, it's a property of the BMW nav system not the Intravee.
  19. Not the part that says 'Mode' on the left, that will switch temporarily. The part on the right that has an icon of two overlapping rectangles (it's supposed to be a tape ejecting from the tape drive to indicate 'Audio').
  20. Wow, our very own forum!
  21. You need to use the 'Rectangles' button to switch permenantly to the audio screen, otherwise it will just switch back after about 5 seconds. Try Amazon, look for Scosche Passport or CableJive dock stubs (make sure is the charge converter not just adapter).
  22. You need to use the 'Rectangles' button to switch permenantly to the audio screen, otherwise it will just switch back after about 5 seconds. Try Amazon, look for Scosche Passport or CableJive dock stubs (make sure is the charge converter not just adapter).
  23. Sorted the spark plug socket rubber, sort of. First, this is how long the tool kit socket is 30cm! I bought a cheap 18mm spark plug socket, the nearest metric equivalent to 11/16ths, and removed both the grip rubbers. The BMW rubber was longer than the 18mm socket rubber so I cut the BMW rubber down to form a packing piece Stuffed both pieces back in the BMW socket and it works a treat. Held securely, but so too tightly. Snap-On make a 11/16ths plug socket, so I'll get one of those too so I don't have to use the toolkit socket in future.